Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette from the Collection of the Delaware County Historical Society

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.1)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.1)

Description

[page 1]

[corresponds to front page of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


BOARD OF TRADE

EDITION OF THE

Semi-Weekly Gazette.

DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22 1899.


[image]



J.W.Bashford, First Vice President. R.E. Hills, President. T.C. Jones, Second Vice President

E.E. Naylor, Secretary. E.I. Pollock, Treasurer.

DELAWARE BOARD OF TRADE:

OFFICERS: (For Three Years.) (For Two Years.) (For One Year.)

President- R.E. HILLS. E.F. GWYNN. C.W. WILES. F.M. BAUEREIS.

First Vice Pres.-J.W. BASHFORD. C.B. ADAMS. E.E. NAYLOR. W.A. MORRISON.

Second Vice Pres- T.C. JONES. J.H. LAWSON. T.J. GRIFFIN. H.E. BUCK.

Secretary- E.E. NAYLOR. TRACY M. THOMSON. F.M. MARRIOTT. G.J. HOFFMAN.

Treasurer- E.I. POLLOCK W.F. DODGE. W.R. CARPENTER. JAMES McDONALD.

W. M. HESELTINE. R.J. PUMPHREY. W.A. WILSON.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.2)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.2)

Description

[page 2]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 2 of the
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


[image] THE FIRM OF

V.T. HILLS & CO.

Is one of the best known and oldest in Delaware. This business was established in 1855
by Reuben E. Hills and

his oldest son. The present partnership was formed in 1886, and is composed of
three sons of Reuben E. Hills, who

have been engaged in the

Wholesale Grocery

business practically all their lives. Selling goods exclusively to dealers,
they enjoy a large share of the grocery

trade of their own city. A visit to their crowded store room will convince
one that the Delaware grocers do not

need to send many orders to outside markets. The upper floors of their building
are occupied with Baskets,

Woodenware and hundreds of articles making up the list of grocers goods,
including a large line of Teas. Among

good judges this house has had for years a reputation for the quality and
selection of their Teas. One of the

largest stocks of writing tablets in Ohio may also be found in their store.


CANNED FRUIT AND VEGETABLES

Form a very important feature in the grocery trade this year, and they report a

large trade in California Canned goods, in which early purchases proved a

good investment. That this firm is a strong supporter of Delaware industries

is proved by finding on their shelves more than -- brands of Delaware

made cigars, for all of which they report a good demand. An unusual but

valuable arrangement in their store is the cold storage room, in which Dried

Fruit and other commodities by the car load may be kept fresh and sound

through the hottest summer.


The accompanying illustration is intended to show one of the most im-

portant features of their business, which is their principal warehouse,

located on the Big Four Railroad. Four cars of merchandise can be

handled here at one time. Here they receive a large part of their

entire purchases, and from here the heavy goods are distributed to the different

railways for out of town orders, as the shipping facilities of our city enable

them to send groceries to all the markets in the adjoining parts of Ohio. An-

other building on the Big Four track is devoted to the storage of Stoneware,

of which a full assortment is always kept in stock. There are two points

especially upon which this house has built its reputation, First, by prompt

shipment of their orders; Second, in sending their customers the goods they

buy, and not something else. Retail grocers appreciate these two points.


[image]

AN OLD LANDMARK

NO SOUVENIR or history of Delaware would be complete without special reference to the

"unique" business building which for more than 80 years has stood on the South-west

corner of Sandusky and Winter streets, and for all of that time has been one of the

leading mercantile rooms of the city. This building is indeed a landmark, and were it to

be replaced by a modern structure, the older residents would hardly know the town when

they struck the corner of Sandusky and Winter streets. Although the outside of this building has

remained almost unchanged for all or these years, the same is not true of the inside. It has been

remodeled and improved from time to time by successive occupants, and at the present time is one

of the most complete and MODERN CLOTHING STORES to be found anywhere in the country.


Clothing

Here is a great stock of new and stylish goods. Everything

desirables for Men, Boys, and Children. Up-to-date methods.

Big volume and small margins.


Hats

A complete hat store, All the new shapes as soon as out, and

by the modern way, you save some money on your hats here.

We carry a nice line of all styles and sizes of Caps.


Furnishings

No larger or finer line of furnishings ever shown in a town of

this size. Our prices on these show the modern way of

merchandising. Try us and see if not correct.


THIS STORE

IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY

W.C. JAYNES, OF COLUMBUS,

& W.A. WILSON, OF DELAWARE.

UNDER THE WELL KNOWN NAME OF

THE STANDARD
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.3)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.3)

Description

[page 3]

[corresponds to page 3 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE--BOARD OF TRADE EDITION. 3

DELAWARE

In the year 1808 the town of Dela-

ware was laid out by Col. Moses Byx-

be and Hon. Henry Baldwin. These

pioneers of our beautiful city showed

excellent judgment and taste in choos-

ing the site for their town, and their

selection could hardly have been im-

proved upon. The gently rolling lands

bordering upon the Olentangy River

proved ideal spots for the homes that

soon dotted these hill tops and valleys,

and nature provided them with most

admirable drainage, conducive to the

health and happiness of the sturdy set-

tlers.

In 1816 Delaware was incorporated

into a village. While the town never

experienced any mushroom boom, its

growth was steady until in the year

1850 it could boast of some twenty-five

hundred of as worthy and intelligent

inhabitants as could be found any-

where. In the next forty years its

growth was more rapid, and the Fed-

eral Census of 1890 showed that it had


[image: RESIDENCE OF MR. F.P. HILLS.]


grown to a flourishing and enterpris-

ing city of over 8,200 population. Per-

haps its growth since that time has

not been so rapid as it was in the pre-

vious decade, but Delaware has grown,

and also made great progress in ac-

quiring modern conveniences and ad-

vantages which go toward rendering it

the very desirable place of residence

that it undeniably is. There is not

much doubt but that the census of 1900

will show a population of fully 10,-

000, and with the impetus that should

be given by our new Board of Trade

to the development of its natural and

other advantages, the census of 1910

ought to show a population of 15,000

or more.

The aim of this Board of Trade edi-

tion of the Gazette is to publish to the

world the many advantages awaiting

to be developed that we believe our

beautiful city is possessed of, and to

present the great inducements it offers

for newcomers to settle within its bor-

ders. This we want to do in a plain,

straightforward manner, and desire to

avoid all extravagance in statement or

description.


AS A PLACE OF RESIDENCE.

What can Delaware offer in the way

of a place to reside to thos seeking

new homes?

NATURAL DRAINAGE.

The consideration of healthfulness


[image: RESIDENCE OF MR. L.L. HUDSON]


of location is perhaps the greatest fac-

tor in deciding the choice of residence.

Owning to the rolling character of the

ground on which Delaware is built,

with its numerous small hills and val-

leys, very fine natural drainage is giv-

en our building lots, which adds much

to the healthfulness and convenience

of the inhabitants. Speaking on this

subject, one of our most skillful and

observing physicians remarked that

there is hardly a square rod of ground

in Delaware but that is susceptible of

perfect natural drainage. Delaware

being one of the highest places in the

state, 378 feet about Lake Erie, and

943 feet above the sea level, its altitude

renders its climate most delightful and

healthy.

PURE WATER.

Our town is provided with splendid

water works and system, by which the

inhabitants are furnished pure water

of superior quality in unlimited quan-

tities. A more extended description of

the works and the water will be found

in another place. In addition to this

water, a large number of celebrated

MINERAL SPRINGS

are continually gushing forth waters

of great and varied medicinal virtues,

which waters are freely given for

drinking purposes to all comers. (An

exhaustive description of these springs

and a report of their medicinal qual-

ties, is prepared by an eminent physi-

cian especially for this issue).

EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGES

are perhaps the most important con-

sideration. No place in Ohio is pro-

vided with better common schools has

Delaware. Under Professor Stokes and

his able corps of assistants and teach-

ers, our schools have reached a high

degree of perfection. Our High School

has gained an enviable repuation

rarely attained by schools of its class

For older students, our peerless O.W.

University offers unexcelled advan-

tages and facilities. Full descriptions

of the Schools and University will be

found in the proper place.

CHURCH PRIVILEGES.

Our Church privileges are unexcell-

ed in a town of this size. We have

eight Methodist Churches, one Pres-

byterian, one Episcopal, two Lutheran,

two Baptists, one German Reformed,

and one Catholic. Their pulpits are

ably filled with eloquent, earnest and

devout ministers.

ENTERPRISING MERCHANTS.

Delaware is well supplied with mer-

chants, grocers, butchers, bakers, mar-

ket gardeners, etc., who can supply

our citizens with all material wants,

And their stocks will be found com-

plete and up to date, while Delaware

prices will be found to be as reasona-

ble as any.

Delaware citizens pride them selves

upon their intelligence and sociability,

and social life in our city is most

charming.

ENTERTAINMENTS.

A very high class of musical and

literary entertainments are attracted

here on account of the University,

which all citizens are privileged to at-

tend at a very reasonable cost. Our

splendid Opera House also attracts

numerous theatrical and miscellaneous

entertainments.

FOR COMMERCIAL TRAVELERS.

Delaware furnishes an ideal home

for the Comemrcial Traveler. Its

central location renders it a conve-

nient starting point for his various

trips, the thirty passenger trains

which leave Delaware every twenty-

four hours furnishing abundant facili-

ties for rapidly reaching all desired

points. His family can live cheaper

in Delaware and enjoy more comforts

than in a large city, and while he is

necessarily away from home so much

of his time, the Delaware traveler and

feel assured that his family are safer

in his absence than they would be in

a larger place.

In connection with the water system,

a splendid and efficient

FIRE DEPARTMENT,

Under Chief Heller, almost eliminates

the danger of losses from fire. Proba-

bly no town in the state the size of

Delaware, has suffered so little loss

from fire. The great number of hous-

es built of brick, also lessens the lia-

bility of loss from fire.

After Health,

An excellent


[image: RESIDENCE OF HON. J. D. VANDEMAN.]


ELECTRIC CAR LINE

Furnishes cheap and rapid transporta-

tion to all parts of the city. The city

is well lighted by gas and electricty.

TELEPHONE SERVICE.

Perhaps in no town in the state is

the telephone service so good as in

Delaware. Splendid equipments have

been put in by the Central Union and

Citizens' Companies, and any house-

holder can have direct connection, not

only with the seven hundred local

users of the 'phones, but also with all

parts of the cuntry, at extremely rea-

sonable rates.

Delaware is a

BEAUTIFUL PLACE

to live. There is no more beautiful

town in Ohio. Her lovely homes

pleasantly located on her luxuriantly

shaded streets, are unsurpassed for

comfort and convenience. Rents are

cheap. Houses and lots can be

bought cheaply here. Delaware is a

home city. It is estimated that 85 per

cent of her inhabitants own their own

homes.

BEAUTIFUL DRIVES.

To those who own a horse, and de-

light in driving, Delaware will prove

an ideal place of residence. Its well

kept and splendidly shaded streets of-

fer fine opportunities for short drives,

while there are a large number of

beautiful drives along the good roads

raching out from the otwn. The

drive down along the Olentangy Riv-

er for ten miles is one that [illegible]

match for beauty of scenery and pleas-

ure.

DELAWARE

AS A PLACE TO DO BUSI-

NESS IN.

Delaware is the county seat of Del-

ware county, which has a population

of 30,000. Its soil is very fertile and

well adapted to all kinds of agricul-

tural operations. It is farmed by as

intelligent and enterprising lot of

farmers as can be found anywhere.

The raising of

FINE STOCK

is a great specialty with Delaware

county farmers, and some of the finiest

horses, cattle, sheep and swine in the

country are bred by them, and many

splendid animals have been sent from

here all over the country, and their

superior qualities have made Dela-


[image: AT LITTLE'S WHITE SUPLHUR SPRINGS]


ware county famous. Splendid crops

of grain and hay are practically a cer-

tainty in this county. Our farmers are

prosperous, and most of them do all

their trading in Delaware. The in-

habitants of the city mostly own their

own homes they are generally well-to-

do, and make excellent customers.

They furnish our merchants a large

share of the patronage enjoyed by

them.

O. W. UNIVERSITY.

The Ohio Wesleyan University at-

tracts a thousand or more young men

and women to Delaware, who are resi-

dents of the city for ten months of

the year. This body of bright young

people add greatly to the business of

Delaware, and they leave quite a large

sum of money annually with our mer-

chants and business men. The nearly

fifty members of the faculty, many of

whom have families, are permanent

residents, and make most desirable

customers. The University attracts

also many families, who come to Dela-

ware to give their children the advan-

tage of our superiior educational facil-

ities. They make good citizens, and

necessarily spend much money here.

MECHANICS.

The hands employed by the Big

Four shops, the Chair Co., the Clay

Works, Hard Wood Working Estab-

lishments, the Cigar Factories, The

Electric Light Works, the Gas Co., the

Electric Car Line, the Water Works,

and many small manufactories, receive

good wages, and are free buyers of the

necessities and luxuries of life, and

are just the kind of citizens that the

Board of Trade wants to induce many

more of to come to Delaware.

SHIPPING FACILITIES, ETC.

The three important railways passing

through Delaware, afford its mer-

chants and business men excellent

shipping facilities. The American and

Wells-Fargo Express Companies have

well managed offices here. Our two

telephone companies furnish excellent

service, and prove a great convenience

to both merchants and customers.

BANKING FACILITIES.

Delaware has four first-class

Banks, with ample capital to

afford all the accommodations

required by the merchants and

business men of the town. These

banks are all solid financial institu-

tions, conducted by men of high char-

acter and undoubted integrity. They

are the First National Bank of Dela-

ware, The Delaware County National

Bank, The Delaware Savings Bank,

and the Deposit Banking Co.


A MUNIFICENT DONATIONS.

MASONIC HALL ERECTED BY MR. SIDNEY MOORE


[image]

To the generosity of Mr. and Mrs.

Sidney Moore, Delaware is indebted

for a handsome and substantial public

improvement, which will always stand

a credit to the city and a monument

to its gracious donors. Early in the

present year the gratifying announce-

ment was made that Mr. Moore had

purchased the beautiful and conven-

ient lot on the southwest corner of

William and Franklin street, and

would erect upon it a handsome build-

ing to be used as a Masonic Hall,

and that suitable rooms would be pro-

vided in it for the Public Library, and

for the Ladies' Christian Union.

This generosity and thoughtfulness

was greatly appreciated by the mem-

bers of Hiram Lodge, and the other

Masonic orders of which Mr. Moore is

one of the Oldest members, and also by

the public spirited ladies who were en-

deavoring to establish a Library, and

the members of the Christian Union.

As for the citizens of Delaware, they

were all delighted and gratified at the

munificence of the gift, and proud to

be fellow citizens of Sidney Moore.

The building was soon gotten under

way, and on June 23d last, the corner

stone was laid with the beautiful and

impressive masonic ceremonies, con-

ducted by M. w. Grand Master E.C.

Guilford, of Cleveland. A large num-

ber of prominent Masons from all

over the state participated in the cere-

monies, and lodges from Marion, Co-

lumbus, Springfield, Circleville, Ken-

teon and other places, attended in a

body. A large number of visitors

were attracted to Delaware and the

city itself was gaily decked with flags

and bunting in honor of the occasion,

and the day was made a holiday, long

to be remembered. One of the princi-

pal features of the day was the im-

posing parade led by the Marion

Knights Templar, followed by Hiram


[image: Hear Ye] Ho Ye

MAIDENS, MEN AND

DAMES,

.BODURTHA.

WANTS TO MAKE

YOUR FRAMES,

Within these Frames he'll

put your faces,

And thereby show your

many graces.


Lodge, and various visiting Masonic

bodies. Several fine bands furnished

excellent music.

The building is now being rapidly

finished inside by the contractors,

Messrs. Heller & mcDonald, and the

Hall will be dedicated about Feb. 1st.

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM.

The Public Library and Reading

Room, which by the great kindness of

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Moore, is to oc-

cupy the large east room in the new

Masonic building, is the outgrowth of

a Woman's Book Club of several

years' standing. In the fall of ninety-

seven, they took their years' books,

begged others, with a small member-

ship fee bought more, and opened a

Circulating Library of less than a

hundred volumes. When the generous

proffer of quarters for a Public Libra-

ry and Reading Room came from Mr.

and Mrs. Moore, they offered their "be-

ginning" as a nucleus for the future

Public Library of Delaware, turning

over to the new Association over four

hundred books, and more than eighty

dollars in money, thus making it pos-

sible for the new Library Association

to accept the offer of a room, open the

Library free to the public, and apply

to the School Board -- under a law

passed two years ago -- for a tax for

Library purposes, and thus fulfill the

hope and desire of the little hand of

women who made the first venture.

A few months shoud see the new

room attractively furnished and equip-

ped as a Reading Room and Library,

and being profitable used and enjoyed

by the citizens, and especially by the

school children of Delaware.

E. M. HELLER.

The plans and specifications for this

building were drawn by the well

known architects of Delaware, E.M.

Heller & Son.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.4)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.4)

Description

[page 4]

[corresponds to page 4 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


4 DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.

MOST VALUABLE

MINERAL SPRINGS.

DELAWARE CAN JUSTLY CLAIM TO BE THE

"SARATOGA OF THE WEST."

HER MANY SPRINGS POSSESS GREAT MEDICINAL VIRTUES -- ARE

ESPICIALLY RICH IN LIFE-GIVING GASSES.

Exhaustive Treatise, Prepared by Dr. S.W. Fowler.

Delaware possesses some of the most

valuable mineral springs in the world,

and each spring charged with medici-

nal and therapeutical properties which

have the most beneficial influence on

mankind, both in health and disease.

Many watering places and health re-

sorts enjoying the patronage of many

thousands of people, would be overjoy-

ed with water of such wonderful ther-

apeutic values as our own.

APPRECIATED BY ABORIGINES.

If these waters had been properly

developed, we would now be unable to

furnish accommodations, and if we go

to work, the hundreds, yea thousands,

of those who know of these waters

will be our strongest advocates; for

they stand ready to give testimony of

the beneficial results of these Chalybe-

ate and Sulphuretted waters. Long

before tradition taught our forefathers

about them, the wild animals could

have been seen here, drinking from

these springs, not only to quench their

thirst, but for the marvelous influence

upon their vitality. The Indian told

the white man how he found the buf-

falo, the deer, and the bears and cat-

tle congregated here; how the vari-

ous tribes came here to secure their

meats while the animals visited these

healthful waters, and then how the

different tribes finally pitched their

tents in the valleys and hills along

the Olentangy River and the Delaware

Run. They were wont to relate to the

white frontiersman the marvelous

benefits the old and the young derived

from the waters. They fully appreci-

ated that these mineral springs pos-

sessed something far better, more pure

and greater than the other waters in

the river and streams, as well as other

springs in other localities.

GREAT MEDICINAL QUALITIES.

The white pioneer soon learned also

that these springs [illegible]

which made them better than

other waters, and located near them

to enjoy their health-giving proper-

ties. He, too, saw with surprise, ani-

mals, both wild and domestic, seeking

these springs, and only stopped com-

ing to them when they were shut out

by the fences. For over half a centu-

ry, thousands of people annually fol-

lowed the same law and instinct, not

fully appreciating the medicinal pow-

er in these mineral waters, until some

years ago, when a few enterprising

and progressive citizens connected

with the University and city, believed

that these waters contained valuable

medicinal agents of great value to hu-

manity, and possessed by but few

mineral springs in the world. Acting

upon their belief, they had them anal-

yzed. The analysis proved that each

and every mineral spring possessed

medicinal qualitites of uncommon and

beneficial influence to mankind. This

wonderful revelation made by them

proved that the waters were not only

similar, but far superior to many oth-

ers whose fame had spread far and

near. These white and black and sa-

line sulphur and chalybeate springs in

this locality are far superior in every

respect to many in this and foreign

lands. The analysis has proved that

our sulphur springs are better and

stronger than those of Virginia, where

thousands visit annually. They are

better, and possess more valuable in-

gredients than those of Pennsylvania

or Colorado. The temperature of

springs, as well as the waters charged

with certain medicinal agents, render

them more or less valuable for thera-

peutical purposes. As a rule, spring

waters have a temperature of 33 de-

grees. When the temperature is high-

er than 36 degrees, they are known as

thermal springs. These are often of

more or less value independently of

the power of the water to dissolve

mineral substances and the gases they

contain. Yet when a spring is ther-

mal, and contains the important gas-

es, and holds in solution valuable

mineral agents, they become of far

greater importance to mankind.

Such are the springs in this locality.

Our suplhur springs have a tempera-

ture of 60 degrees, and the chalybeate

springs 56 degrees, while the famous

Wildsbad Spring of Germany has a

temperature of 61 degrees; the Clifton,

of New York, 54 degrees; Carlsbad,

131 degrees; The Warmbrunn, Ger-

many, 68 degrees; the Hot Spring of

Arkansas, 90 degrees to 108 degrees;

and the Great Guyser of Iceland, 180

degrees.

COMPOSITION VARIES.

The composition of mineral waters

varies according to the strata through

which the water passes, as well as to

the pressure and previous composition

under which it is in contact with the

deposits. Waters vary in composi-

tion in the same locality, yet comes to

the surface in close proximity to each

other, as is witnessed in this locality.

We see the same condition at Sarato-

ga, New York. Coming by pressure to

the surface, these waters are found

[illegible] therapeutical values

one from the other, and yet each and ev-

ery one possessing rare and valuable

medicinal virtues. When we have

thoroughly drilled down into the great

mineral strata below us, and thus

carefully developed other springs, and

we may say, properly located them,

there will be no reason why they will

not be sought after for drinking and

bathing purposes, and the curing of

all forms of diseases equal to, if not

far more, than those in other localities

of less value.

RARE MINERAL COMBINATIONS.

The rare mineral combinations so

universally present in these mineral

springs, and with which we should

have been more deeply interested, are

not so different from those whose wat-

ers have cured many diseases, and giv-

en happiness to many individuals.

The oxygen, nitrogen, carbon diox-

ide, carbonate and bicarbonate of so-

dium; the sulphate and chloride of so-

dium; the carbonate and bicarbonate

of calcium; the different forms of iron

combined and re-combined by nature's

law, are of the highest therapeutical

value when properly used.

The classification of mineral waters

is exceedingly difficult, yet all are

based upon the predominence of some

certain constituents, or constituents

imparting to them certain medicinal

and therapeutical values to be used in

different diseases or in various ways.

The special or principal constituent

giving the peculair character to the

mineral waters, acting as a cathartic

or as a laxative, is the bicarbonate of

mangnesia and bicarbonate of soda,

and the chloride of sodium. The ton-

ic mineral waters contain bicarbonate

of iron or oxide of iron. The altera-

tive mineral waters contain iodide of

sodium and chloride of potassia and

sodium. The diuretic properties of

the mineral waters depend upon the

bicarbonate of lithia and protox-

ide of hydrogen. It will be well to re-

member this when studying and dis-

cussing the qualities and uses of our

mineral waters.


[image: FAMOUS WHITE SULPHUR SPRING ON THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS]


LIFE-GIVING GASES.

That the carbonic acid gas, sulphur-

etted hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen

are the life-giving principles of all our

mineral springs, we can no longer

doubt. They contribute to the solu-

bility of the salts contained in the

waters, and render them more palata-

ble and more agreeable to the stom-

ach. The perfect solubility of these

salts enhances the great medicinal

power of the mineral waters, and

hence are more valuable for drinking

and bathing, and curing of diseases.

Once let the gases be driven off or es-

cape, and the water evaporated, and

we will find it will take more than ten

times the amount of rain water to re-

dissolve them. The absence of these

gases in the strongest iron springs of

Europe render them worthless, or

nearly so.

When comparing our springs with

many others, we find a much larger

amount of gases in them, thus mak-

ing them of the highest benefit in cur-

ing diseases and for every day use. It

seems useless for us to discuss these

gases further, but before leaving them,

we will say they seem to travel thrugh

some of the springs and escape, while

in the case of the springs in this lo-

cality, they are most thoroughly and

firmly impregnated with them.

LAXATIVE QUALITIES.

While many famous mineral springs

contain bicarbonate of magnesia,

which acts as a laxative and an antac-

id in some stomachs, our springs con-

tain not only the same, but added to

it is the sulphate of magnesia and

chloride of sodium, acting more mild-

ly and safely as a laxative and cathar-

tic as well as correcting the "sour

stomach," especially seen in those ad-

dicted to the use of alcohol, and those,

too, who overindulge in eating at un-

usual hours. By using these waters

the "heartburn" and sick headache

soon disappear. They start the torpid

liver, and arouse the intestinal inac-

tion. The medical profession well

know and highly appreciate the use of

the carbonate and bicarbonate of so-

dium, found so abundantly in our

springs, and can tewstify to their won-

derful and highly beneficial influence

as medicinal agents, especially in cor-

recting the morbid secretions of uric

acid.

BENEFICIAL IN RHEUMATISM.

As found in the waters of our

springs, the acids hold in solution al-

buminates, the phosphates, &c., ren-

dering them thus highly beneficial in

all forms of rheumatism. With little

labor, many valuable testimonials

could be furnished giving proof of re-

markable cures in this disease. When

used for bathing and drinking the ef-

fects have been far more rapid.

TONI WATERS.

The Chalybeate springs, known as

the Lenape or Hills' springs, furnish

one of the best tonic waters in the

country. The iron contained in the

waters, when taken into the body,

builds up the red corpuscles of the

blood, stimulates the appetite, and

enriches the whole body. That most

important agent so demanded by the

whole animal creation, chloride of so-

dium, or common salt, is abundantly

found in the chalybeate springs, and

in each and every one of our springs.

Every physician can testify how

this agent increases the solubility of

the albumen of the blood, and pre-

vents the rapid destruction of red

corpuscles.

It stimulates the secretion of gas-

tric juice, increases the flow of bile,

and the more rapid interchange of

fluids in the body, called, osmosis,

[illegible] of the kidneys; there are in-

creased secretion and excretion of

urine. We dare say, the remarkable

influence salt has on the body we can-

not estimate until we have used the

water so remarkable supplied with

them. The only method of proving

their action is by carefully watching

and recording the therapeutical effects

on the patient. The same is true of

all the waters. The effects have been

watched and recorded, and many are

ready to give testimony of astonish-

ing and bewildering results.

Chemical analysis fails to decide the

exact medicinal effects, independently

of the careful and faithful observa-

tions of the beneficiary. The afflicted

who have used and been benefitted, al-

ways furnish the best and most relia-

ble evidence.

Blessed as we are now with many

dierent mineral springs, and of the

very highest medicinal virtue, we can

by systematic drilling develop many

more equally as good, if not better,

and at the same time locate them so

that sanitariums, hotels and bath

houses can be erected with great ad-

vantage, to accommodate those wish-

ing to come here for pleasure and

treatment.

SARATOGA OF THE WEST.

The Odevene spring will always be

of vast commercial interest, as the

water is finding an unlimited demand.

It is shipped in large amounts to va-

rious parts of the country, and is

having a growth never dreamed of by

the citizens of Delaware. The steady

development of the Saratoga springs

has been going on until now they

have world-wide renown. What has

been done there can be done here,

and we venture to say should have

been done long before this. Let five

to ten wells be drilled in the most

pleasant parts of the city, and soon

we will see hotel and sanitarium ac-

commodations made for the large

number resorting here for health and

pleasure, and many as permanent cit-

izens, to use the waters, and will see

our population doubled in ten years.

The first spring at Saratoga was

discovered in 1767, "The High Rock

Spring," by Sir Wm. Johnston. Tra-

dition tells of the Indians using from

it long before this. The Congress

Spring was discovered in 1792. Then

followed others in rapid succession,

until now they have over thirty, all

properly analyzed and recorded, each

one possessing rare medicinal proper-

ties, and which over 300,000 people an-

nually visit for health and pleasure.

Why should not the various sulphur

and chalybeate springs of our city be-

come the Saratoga of Ohio and the

West? All of these springs of any re-

pute are, ranging from 60 to 200 feet

below the surface. With the excep-

tion of the High Rock spring, all are

tubed, ranging as stated above.

It is the duty of every scientific and

medical writer interested in our city,

to investigate, write and make reports

upon the history, probable origin

and chemical properties, and the ther-

apeutical value, and the medicinal val-

ue of each and every spring. In this

manner a vast and valuable fund of

information can be collected for the

city, and for all coming here to use

the waters for various forms of dis-

eases.

We dare say this should have been

done long before this, and the benefits

would not be felt by all of us. It has

only been of recent date that the Ode-

vene spring waters have been brought

prominently before the people, and its

possibilities cannot be estimated. The

reason for this rapid growth is as sta-

ted before, from the properties found

in the water of such marvelous thera-

peutical action. It is only too fre-

quently stated by the wise and unwise

the learned and the unlearned, that

these, as well as all mineral waters

have not medicinal virtues, and the

same results can be attained by using

artificially prepared waters.

NATURE'S COMBINATIONS BEST.

The argument only confirms the

benefits arising from the use of these

waters as nature furnishes them to us

yet all differing in power as cathartics

laxatives and diuretics and elixir wat-

ers, as discussed and taught in medi-

cal books. The action of these same

agents chemically prepared act upon

the organs by irritation, causing se-

cretion and elimination, while these

same agents in these mineral waters

are natural to the body, and acting as

powerful oxidizers of the disintegrated

or broken down tissues, and elimina-

ting from the body by the different or-

gans the waste matter. These waters,

charged with important elements,

again furnish the blood with powerful

restoratives to build up tissue, and to

cure disease. That the Odevene stim-

ulates the liver secretion, and acts as

a cholagogue, we have abundance of

evidence. Those using it report the

laxative or cathartic effects, or the

more rapid digestion and relief from

distress in the stomach. The gastro-

intestinal irritability is relieved and

cured. The dark, swarty complexion

changed to a ruddy, healthy color, and

the whole system, through the glandu-

lar organs is strengthened and invig-

orated. The weak and debilitated

heart and arteries gain power and

strength. The nervous system is elec-

trified and set going. To give a list

of the diseases influenced and cured

by these waters would take too much

time, and would be confusing. These

mineral waters, like all others, should

be used by the sick under regular and

strict rules, and always under the

care of a physician or nurse, who have

carefully investigated their use. I

dare say the medical staff of our city

as far above the ordinary, and may be

relied upon for instructing and assist-

ing those wishing advice. Those in

health need no help, but are ready to

testify to the benefits derived from us-

ing the waters for bathing and drink-

ing.

THE ODEVENE SPRING.

The Odevene Spring is owned and

operated by the "Odevene Spring Com-

pany." It is located just east of the

campus of the Ohio Wesleyan Univer-

sity, and a little west of the Olentan-

gy River, and at the junction of the

C. C. C. & St. L. R. R. and the C. S.

& H. R. R.. A company drilled this

well into the rock and struck this val-

uable thermal mineral spring water at

the dept of 400 feet. The well is in

the great lime rock strata, and the sul-

phur component renders the

water valuable in many forms of

disease. The company have beauti-

fied their well with an artificial stone

basin. Their bottling works are near-

by the spring, where they work a

number of hands, washing the bottles,

filling, lebeling and packing ready for

shipping. They have arranged for a

portion of the water to flow from the

well, to accommodate the hundreds of

people who visit it daily for drinking,

&c. Over twenty thousand gallons

flow from the well daily. The won-

derful medicinal effects of the water

have been thoroughly tested, and en-

dorsed, not only by the local physi-

cians, but by other leading physicians.

They prescribe it daily with the ut-

most confidence to those of a seden-

tary habit, and those suffering from

the various forms of bilious disorders.

The water, containing the laxative

salts, chloride of sodium or common

salt, bicarbonate of magnesioum, the

chloride of magnesia, induce effects

that are mild, pleasant and certain,

and without irritating the intestinal

tract or impairing the digestive func-

tions; on the other hand, promoting

the appetite, and stimulating digestion

and assimilation. The chloride of cal-

cium acting powerfully upon the

glands of the skin, the kidneys, and

the mucous membrane, is an agent of

great value as a curative power. The

various forms of eczema, the enlarge-

ment of glands are cured when the

waster is systematically used for drink-

ing and bathing. The same can be

said of the white and black sulphur

waters, as many hundreds, yes thous-

ands, of people who have for these

many years used them, can testify.

MAGNETIC SPRINGS.

We will speak also of the Magnetic

Springs, properly called Chalybeate

springs. The Lenape spring, owned

by Mrs. C.E. Hills, has been analyzed

and tested for years. The ingredients

contained in these waters are of great

benefit to the blood and the body.

Many chalybeate springs in this coun-

try, as well as in Europe, are visited

for the purpose of drinking, bathing,

and treatment. Those at Richmond,

Va., Sharon, Pa., the Bedford, Bright-

on and Cheltenham in Europe, where

large numbers visit continually, speak

volumes for them. Yet the chalybeate

springs of our own city have nearly

the same chemical composition, but in

addition combine the valuable saline

properties, making them of far more

value as curative agents than those

mentioned.

That we may prove to you that what

has been said is true, we will give the

analysis of our springs, and a few of

the most noted in this country and in

Europe.

OBEVENE ANALYSIS.

The Odevene natural spring water

(Continued on Page 5.)


[image: DRINK Odevene

Odevene

A NATURAL

Mineral Water.

RICH IN MEDICINAL PROPERTIES.]

Beyond Question

ODEVENE

Is the Greatest Natural

Mineral

Water in the United States

Bottled only at the Celebrated Spring by

The Delaware Odevene Spring Co.,

WRITE FOR PRICES. DELAWARE, OHIO.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.5)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.5)

Description

[page 5]

[corresponds to page 5 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


5 DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.

MOST VALUABLE

MINERAL SPRINGS,

(Continued from Page 4.)

was analyzed by the celebrate con-

sulting and analytical chemist, A.A.

Brenneman, of New York. He gives

the following composition:

[Temperature 60°, density 1,0040, total solid

375.11 per gallon.] Gr.

Potassium Chloride............ 18.63

Sodium Chloride............... 145.87

Lithium Chloride.............. Traces

Calcium Chloride.............. 15.26

Magnesium Chloride............ 55.93

Calcium Sulphate.............. 102.47

Calcium Bicarbonate........... 33.87

Magnesioum Bicarbonate........ 2.64

Alumina and Iron.............. 0.05

Silica........................ 0.37

No Organic Matter.

Less the Carbonic acid and water of the

Bicarbonates.......... 361.32

The important gases spoken of be-

fore, and of such vast importance in

all mineral waters, are in large quan-

tities in this spring:

Per Gal.

Sulphurretted Hydrogen........ 2.924

Nitrogen...................... 5.810

Oxygen........................ 0.158

By the analysis, we see the water,

as stated, is not only a strong mineral,

but a highly saline sulphuretted one.

This chemist further says, this sui-

phurette hydrogen gas. A United

States gallon contains in cubic inches

as follows:

Wellbach well, Germany........ 1.161

Cave well, N. Y............... 2.754

White Sulphur well, N. Y...... 0.884

Florida well, N. Y............ 3.765

Odevene well.................. 2.924

Taking the analysis of these wells, we

find the ODEVENE of greater value in

this gas and its combinations in the

curing of disease, and as a valuable

mineral water.

LENAPE MAGNETIC SPRINGS.

The Lenape Magnetice springs were

known, like the other springs, to the

Indians long before the coming of the

white man. The Lenni-Lenape tribe

of Indians camped in the vicinity of

these waters. There are two of these

springs only a few feet apart, giving

a discharge of 8,400 gallons each per

day. Though so near together, the

waters differ materially in their com-

position, as will be seen in the analy-

sis. Unlike the other springs, it has

a wonderful magnetic influence, mak-

ing it on of the marvels of nature.

Its use in various diseases has been

carefully tested, and found to be of

great value. No. 1 acting most re-

markably on the liver, kidneys and

blood, while No. 2 acts more directly

upon stomach diseases and the bowels

as well as the blood. Having such

large quantities of iron, its use is es-

pecially adapted to the diseases affect-

ing the blood, or when the patient

needs a tonic.

No. 1 Odevene analysis is as follows:

[Temperature 57°, density 1.0320, total solid

per gallon 55.693.]

Sodium Chloride............... 3.346

Calcium Chloride.............. 0.634

Potach Sulphate............... 1.334

Lime Sulphate................. 6.201

Magnesia Sulphate............. 0.934

Lime Bicarbonate.............. 27.421

Magnesia Bicarbonate.......... 15.211

Iron Oxide.................... .539

Silica........................ .054

Organic matter................ .004

_______

55.695

No. 2 Odevene analysis is as follows:

[Temperature 57°, density 1.0620, Total solid

per gallon 40.64]

Sodium Chloride............... 2.15

Lime Sulphate................. 5.12

Magnesia...................... 2.31

Magnesia Carbonate............ 12.11

Lime Carbonate................ 17.73

Potassia...................... Traces

Iron Oxide.................... 0.41

Alumina....................... Traces

Organic matter................ 0.81

When these waters have been used

regularly and systematically, they im-

prove the secretions and the appetite,

relieve the decomposition of food in

the stomach, and stop the eructation

of gas, cure the diseased mucous

membranes, and stimulates the torpid

liver and intestine to action, builds up

the broken down blood corpuscles,

and thus stimulates the whole organ-

ism. It being a strong antacid, com-

bines with the gastric juices, and acts

as a laxative and cathartic, and acts

most beneficially on all cases of rheu-

matism.

WHILE SULPHUR SPRING.

The oldest and most famous spring

is the White Sulphur Spring on the

campus of the Ohio Wesleyan Univer-

sity. Thousands of students and vis-

itors from all parts of the United

States and the world have the most

perfect knowledge of it, and are ready

to give testimony as to its value. How

long it has been flowing tradition fails

to tell. The rich, sulphuretted odor of

this as well as the five others of the

same nature, can be detected long be-

fore reaching the spring. The visit-

ors, on the first visit, are disgusted and

nauseated with the taste and odor,

which is so powerful, but after a few

visits they like it, and are found there

daily praising it in the highest terms.

Daily, hundreds are seen with vessels,

drinking and carrying the water away.

These sulphur springs are more

bountifully supplied with sulphuretted

hydrogen and carbonic acid gases than

any other springs in the country. In

each gallon of water can be found 96

cubic inches of sulphuretted hydrogen

gas, and 36 cubic inches of carbonic

acid gas. The large amount of chlo-

ride of sodium, and the different forms

of chloride of lime, compounded with

magnesia, renders the water most val-

uable as powerful antacid, acting to

cure dyspepsia, toning up the mucous

membrane of the stomach and intes-

tines, and restoring the digestion.

They start the torpid liver, and pan-

creatic and intestinal action, acting as

a mild laxative and cathartic. The

wonderful composition of the water al-

so shows great diurectic properties,

many testify to the beneficial influence

on the kidneys. Thus we find we have

a mild cathartic refrigerant, diurectic

antacid, and an antiseptic water, to

bless and benefit mankind, as found

in no other locality. The gaseous pro-

ducts found in one gallon of water by

analysis:

Sulphureted Hydrogen gas, 96 cubic inches.

Carbonic acid gas, 24 cubic inches.

White Sulphur Spring of Delaware--Temper-

ature 60°, density 1.0026, total solids; gasses--

Sulphureted Hydrogen 96, Carbonic acid gas 24.

97 grains of the deposit resulting from the

evaporation of several gallons of water from

the While Sulphur Spring as follows:

Gr.

Chloride of Sodium 48

Calcium Sulphate 8

Calcium Bicarbonate 20

Sulphate magnesium 16

Bicarbonote Magnesium 8

Carbonate of soda 5

The sulphuretted springs known as

the C. O. Little springs, west of the

city, containing white and black sul-

phur, are equally valuable, but have

never been analyzed.

These sulphuretted waters, possess-

ing these mineral substances and

abundance of gases, can be readily

distinguished from the others by the

odor as well as by drinking. Those

found in Europe, as well as in various

parts of the United States are far in

ferior to these in our locality. Those

in Virginia and in Pennsylvania do

not conform to those here in power or

medicinal influence. The famous

Harrogate sulphur spring has a den-

sity of 1.01113, and a temperature of

48 degrees. Carbonic acid gas of 22

cubic inches; carburetted hydrogen

5.84; sulphuretted hydrogen 5.51; Nit

rogen 2; making a total of about 36

cubic inches. Sulphate of lime 0.181

gr.; carbonate of lime 12.3; and chlo-

ride of calcium 81.7 gr.; chloride of

magnesia 35.6 gr.; chlorate pottassia

64.7 gr.; chloride of sodium .866 gr;

sulphate of sodium 15.4 gr., with a few

other unimportant elements.

The celebrated Clifton Springs, of

New York, to which so many annually

go, will not compare with either the

White Sulphur Springs or the Ode-

vene, yet it is classed with the lead-

ing mineral springs of the world. The

temperature or the density is not giv-

en:

Clifton Springs, N.Y.: Gr.

Sulphate of Lime............. 17.30

sulphate of Magnesia......... 4.12

sulphate of Soda............. 1.94

Carbonate of Lime............ 2.42

Carbonate of Magnesia........ 3.08

Chloride of Sodium........... 2.32

Chloride of Calcium.......... 1.02

Chloride of Magnesia......... 1.02

White Sulphur Springs, Va., Temperature 48°.

Carbonate Oxide.............. .54

Carbonate of Calcium......... .90

Carbonate of Magnesia........ .83

Sulphate of Sodium........... .71

Sulphate of Calcium.......... .10

2.5 cubic inches sulphureted hydrogen gas.

2 carbonic acid gas.


A GRAND OPPORTUNITY

For Profitable Investment of Capital in

Properly Utilizing Delaware's Wealth

of Natural Mineral Water.

There is no reason why Delaware

could not be made a veritable "Sara-

toga of the West," if her almost un-

limited resources in mineral waters,

possessing so great medicinal virtues,

were properly developed and utilized.

From the foregoing article, it will be

seen that we have the waters in

abundance and that their varieties

and virtues are far greater than those

possessed by Saratoga or any other

one great Health and Pleasure Resort.

Delaware being in the center of the

State of Ohio, is readily accessible

from every quarter. Our railways

reach in every direction, and put us in

easy communication with all parts of

the United States, and no doubt many

pleasure and health seekers could be

attracted here.

It seems certain that profitable in-

vestment is awaiting the capital of the

enterprising man or men who will

properly develop and utilize nature's

hidden stores of health-giving waters,

which are ever ready to respond to a

properly made invitation to come to

the surface and bestow their blessings

upon humanity.


E.R. RYAN & SON

BICYCLE REPAIRING

AND SUNDRIES ~ ~ ~

FURNITURE

~ ~ REPAIRING

Satisfaction Guaranteed.

76 N. Sandusky Street.

DELAWARE OHIO.


A NOBLE INSTITUTION.

DELAWARE COUNTY CHILDREN'S HOME---A CREDIT TO

THE CITY AND COUNTY, AND TO THE

HEARTS OF ITS PROJECTORS.


[image: DELAWARE COUNTY CHILDREN'S HOME]


It was in a little upper room of the

Court House, where the "Ladies'

Christian Union" of our city at that

time held its meetings, and in the ear-

ly months of 1881, that it was decided,

and the final vote taken by that Asso-

ciation, that Delaware needed and

must have a Children's Home. On the

19th of April, 1881, the first public

meeting was held in the Presbyterian

Church, looking to an organization of

this kind. April 27th, at an adjourned

meeting held at St. Peter's (Episcopal)

Church, an organization was perfect-

ed, officers elected, a Constitution and

By-Laws adopted, and this little life-

boat of rescue was launched on no un-

certain sea.

This Children's Home was first or-

ganized as a City Home, but soon wi-

dened out into a County Home, hoping

and [paper torn line illegible] and


[image: A TYPICAL GROUP OF OUR CHILDREN'S HOME CHILDREN.]


support would flow in equally from

city and country. Its incorporators

decided that its support should come

from "public and private subscriptions

and donations," and that it should be

located within the city limits, so its

children could attend public schools

and churches.

After a delay of many months in

perfecting plans of operation, a tem-

porary Home was opened December,

1881 on Union street, with ten child-

ren, six of whom were from the In-

firmary. Though organized in April,

1881, it was not until January, 1882,

that incorporation papers were taken

out. This seemed to give new life and

inspiration to the work, and the Bix-

by house on William street was rented

and systematic work entered upon

April 1st, 1882. The Board of County

Commissioners assisted in rent and

coal, while different churches and

some individuals undertook the fur-

nishing of rooms.

The history of this Home for the

first nine years was one alternating

with clouds and sunshine. Only an

unshaken faith in those having charge,

that it was a God-appointed work, ena-

bled them to meet and conquer the dis-

couragements arising from limited

means, and rented grounds so unsult-

ed and illy adapted to develop aright

the work in hand.

In the summer and fall of 1889, the

positive necessity of a permanent hab-

itation was so pressed upon the hearts

of the workers, that a special commit-

tee was appointed looking to this end.

This committee found buried in some

20 years of legislative debris the fol-

lowing law:

"Section 1. Be it enacted by the

General Assembly of the State of Ohio,

That in any county in the state of Ohio

where there now is, or hereafter may

be, an incorporated "Children's Aid

Society," or "Children's Home," or

"Industrial School," or "Industrial

School and Home," or any other incor-

porated society whose object is the

care, aid and education of neglected

and destitute children, the County

Commissioners [page torn] such county, and

the City Council of any city, in addi-

tion to the powers now conferred upon

such Commissioners or City Council,

are hereby authorized, (if they deem

it judicious) to aid any such institu-

tion to purchase land, erect buildings,

either by subscriptions with others to

raise a fund for that purpose, or by

direct aid or donation or otherwise, in

an amount not exceeding six thousand

dollars, as they deem expedient. (See

Sec. 929 et seq.)"

This they hoped might help them in

securing this permanent Home. About

the same time there was thrown upon

the market the Potter Home, just

north of the city, offered, too, at less

than half its real value, $8,500.00, Mr.

Potter having expended $20,000 in its

improvement, a property admirably

adapted to the wants of this increased

family of little orphans now number-

ing from forty to fifty. The Commis-

sioners, after assuring themselves that

they could lawfully give to this enter-

prise the $6,000.00 allowed in this law,

so decided. The additional amount

necessary was secured by special

legislation, and this Home, so beautiful

for situation, and now the pride and joy

of our whole county, was purchased

by the Board ot Trustees, and deeded

to the Trustees of the Children's Home

so long as it was used by them for the

purposes of a Home.

In the summer of 1893, this Home,

built for a private family, was enlarg-

ed and remodeled. Three thousand

dollars of this money being secured in

right-of-way to the Sandusky Short

Line Railway, the Commissioners

again assisting with the balance of the

amount needed.

February 19, 1896, this beautiful

Home was destroyed by fire. Fortu-

nately there was carried enough insur-

ance to rebuild, which was promptly

done, and out of these ashes rose a

new and in every way improved build-

ing.

This Home has always been self-

supporting, the board of children from

this and other counties [illegible] donations

[page torn]

year, with an average of some 60

children, were $4,726.07 -- with a bal-

lance in treasury of $722.01. Twenty-

one children have been placed in

home the last year. Average cost of

placing children, $14.15, this amount

covering also expense of systematic

visiting during year of children al-

ready placed.

Per capita cost of each child in

current expenses .........$82.91

Per capita cost of each child in

total expenses ........... 96.95

The Gazette is Delaware's newsy

newspaper.


Everybody

Tells us we sell the best

pies, cakes and bread stuffs in the city.

From the way the boys line up for

midnight lunch, one can readily see

that the place to go is

SWOPE'S

Restaurant,

West Winter St. Both 'Phones


Cunningham's

Book Store..

Having purchased the Book

and Stationery Store of L.E.

O'Kane, and wishing to merit

the patronage of the citizens

of Delaware and country sur-

rounding, I know of no better

way than by keeping the best

of everything in my line and

selling at the lowest price. I

expect to keep a full line of

BLANK BOOKS,

MEMORANDUMS,

NOTE BOOKS,

DIARIES, ETC.

I also keep a supply of

miscellaneous books by the

BEST AUTHORS

in all styles of binding and

any book not in stock will be

glad to

ORDER FOR YOU

at same price as if in stock.


In Stationery

I will keep all the latest

styles and shapes, and as fine

stock and large a line as has

ever been kept in Delaware.

Our stock of

HOLIDAY GOODS

(which was oopened out about

December 1st) consists of fine

books for old and young.

MEDALIONS,

ALBUMS,

POCKET BOOKS,

CARD CASES,

COMB AND

BRUSH SETS,

BOOKLETS,

CARDS,

CALENDARS,

ETC., ETC., ETC.

Card and invitation print-

ind done with neatness and

dispatch. Remember the

name and place.

R. A. CUNNINGHAM,

22 North Sandusky Street,

Delaware, Ohio.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.6)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.6)

Description

[page 6]

[corresponds to page 6 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


6 DELAWARE GAZETTE--BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY.


[image: GENERAL VIEW OF THE COLLEGE CAMPUS]


LOCATION.

Long before the Ohio Wesleyan Uni-

versity was dreamed of, Delaware was

famed for beauty and for health.

The rolling ground, the mild climate

and the healing waters made this spot

the headquarters for rest and recrea-

tion for the Delaware Indians after

they had been driven from their east-

ern home. The first white settlers

soon learned that the fame of the sul-

phur springs rested not on Indian le-

gend, but on established facts. Presi-

dent Hayes, when visiting his old

friends in Delaware, was accustomed

to go each morning before breakfast

to the White Sulphur Spring on the

College Campus for a refreshing drink.

He often pronounced this water the

best in the land, and declared that the

Sulphur Spring would make a fortune

for the College, if the Trustees would


[image: UNIVERSITY HALL AND GRAY CHAPEL]


enclose it and employ a Barnum to

advertise its merits. Possibly his

judgment was slighly biased by the

fact that this was the spring of his

boyhood, and also by the fact that at

this spring young Hayes first met Lu-

cy Webb, the first girl admitted to the

College classes. Delaware was noted

as a watering place, until its reputa-

tion as a health resort was swallowed

up it its fame as a college town.

THE CITY

Of about ten thousand inhabitants, lo-

cated twenty-three miles north of co-

lumbus, is very near the geographical

center of Ohio. Railroads entering

Delaware by different routes make it

easy of access, while electric cars and

lights, shady streets, good schools,


[image: ASTRONOMICAL ONSERVATORY]


flourishing churches and beautiful

homes make it an almost ideal dwell-

ing place.

THE COLLEGE GROUNDS

Embrace the fine, rolling Campus in

the heart of the city, the beautiful

Monnett Campus in the west end, and

the picturesque Ob servatory Park,

forty-three acres in all.

BUILDINGS.

Thirteen substantial buildings, well

adapted to their purposes, stand upon

the college grounds. Our space per-

mits a description of only the four

latest additions to this stately group.

UNIVERSITY HALL AND GRAY CHAPEL.

The main building was completed in

1893. It is worth a quarter of a mil-

lion dollars. It is a massive Roman-

esque structure, one hundred and fifty

by one hundred and sixty feet in di-

mensions, four stories high, crowned

by a stately tower one hundred and

forty-eight feet in height. It unites

under one roof the administrative offi-

ces of the University, twelve recitation

rooms, six literary halls, lecture rooms

and Gray Chapel. This Chapel, with

its magnificent Roosevelt organ, has

been pronounced the most spacious

and beautiful college chapel in Amer-

ica. A noted educator who had vis-

ited the leading colleges in the United

States and Eurpose, pronounced Uni-

versity Hall and Gray Chapel the fin-

est college building in the land.

THE ASTRONOMICAL OBSERV-

ATORY

In Observatory Park, occupies the

most commanding site in the city. It

is a handsome pressed brick building,

with a frontage of sixty-two feet, con-

taining a transit room, clock room,

computing and library room and dome.

The telescope contains a refracting

glass nine and one-half inches in di-

ameter, made by J.W. Brashear for

exhibition at the World's Fair. As-

tronomical experts have pronounced it

in clearness of definition superior to

many noted glasses of twice its size.

It enables the student to see a far

larger number of worlds than could

Sir John Herschel, who delcared that

18,000,000 stars were within the range

of his monster telescope.

THE SLOCUM LIBRARY BUILDING

Is the central structure in the College

group. It is one hundred and fifteen

by one hundred and twenty-five feet

in dimensions, built of the famous

Bedford limestone, three stories high,

and fireproof throughout. The stack

room has an estimated capacity of 175,-

000 volumes, while the reading room,

sixty by one hundred feet, lighted

from above, is one of the largest and

most beautiful college reading rooms

in America. The classic design, su-

perior materials, scientific appliances

for light and heat and air, the fine fa-

cilities for preserving, classifying and

cataloguing books, and the admirable

reading room makes the Charles E.

Slocum Building a model structure

for a University library.

Upon the opening of the Library

Building for the use of the students,

September 26th, 1898, there were upon

the shelves 26,300 volumes, exclusive

of unbound periodicals and pamphlets.

In addition to this number, the libra-

ry at Monnett Hall and the Depart-

mental libraries contain a large num-

ber of volumes which are available for

the use of students. These books are

distributed as follows:

1. Monnett Hall Library........2,589

2. Lacroix Memorial Library

Hebrew and German) ......... 792

3. Department of History Library 418

4. Edward Nelson Memorial Li-

brary (Zoological) ......... 62

5. Department of Physics Library 303

6. John Williams White Classical

Library (estimated) ........ 300

7. Library of School of Oratory 365

8. L.D. McCabe Library (Philo-

sophical) .................. 68

9. Library of Comparative Re-

ligions and Missions ....... 198

10. Chemical Laboratory Library 200

____

Total ...................... 5295

The total number of books, there-

fore, available for the use of students

is 31,595.

MONNETT HALL,

The Home for young women, is sit-

uated at a convenient walking dis-

tance from University Hall, on a beau-

tiful campus containing about ten

acres. The building is a large, brick

structure, well furnished throughout.

In addition to a sufficient number of

rooms or suites of rooms, to accommo-

date 225 young women, it contains li-

brary and reading room, gymnasium,

assembly room, Y. W. C. A.

hall, handsome parlors and three ele-

gant literary society halls.

An elevator is provided, and is op-

erated at such times as to remove, to

a large degree, all necessity of climb-

ing stairs.

Every room and corridor is furnish-

ed with steam heat and gas light. Hot

and cold water are supplied on every

floor.

A large, beautiful dining room, with

good service and nutritious and pala-

table food, supplements the other ex-

cellent appointments of this building.

Special mention is made of the very

valuable donation of pictures recently

made by Mrs. V.T. Hills, of Delaware,

Ohio, and placed in the corridors and

reception rooms of Monnett Hall. The

young ladies come into daily contact

with representations of the very best

works of the masters, which cannot

fail to develop the taste for that

which is purest and noblest in art.

In Monnett Hall the trustees have

aimed to provide for the young women

who attend the University a home, at-

tractive, and yet free from the cares

and distractions that often attend

home life. With this in view, nothing

is omitted in equipment or furnishing

that wisdom and experience demand.

The first care is to preserve the health,

and to have all observe the proper

habits of living. Such regulations are


[image: THE SLOCUM LIBRARY]


in force as experience has shown to

be essential to the best care of the

body, to the most rapid progress in

study, and to the highest development

of character. In case of illness, the

student is given at once the best med-

ical attention and placed under the

care of a competent nurse.

It is no [illegible] for boasting, but

[torn line is illegible]

that with from one hundred and fifty

to two hundred and twenty-five per-

sons in Monnett Hall during the past

sixteen years, there have been only a

few cases of serious illness, and not a

single death has occurred. This fact

is the strongest evidence of the health-

fulness of the location, and of the

good sense and care exercised alike by

pupils and teachers. This remarkable

record as to health is due, in part at

least to the out-door exercise in walk-

ing provided daily, and to the opportu-

nities for scientific physical culture

under an experienced teacher.

The expenses at Monnett Hall de-

pend somewhat upon the studies pur-

sued and the location of the room.

The rooms are all well furnished,


[image: WHITE SULPHUR SPRING AND MERRICK HALL--University Hall in the Background.


comfortable and suitable for study.

Room, board, light and heat cost

from $3.75 to $4.25 per week.

For a regular literary course of stu-

dy the tuition or scholarship fee is

$12.00 per term, and the incidental fee

$5.00 per term, and the incidental fee

charged for Music, Art, Elocution and

Commercial studies. But the student

who gives her time wholly to any of

these special studies is not required to

pay the fees named above.

For additional information in re-

gard to Monnett Hall, or estimates of

expenses for young women, address

Prof. C.B. Austin.

DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVER-

SITY.

The University embraces the follow-

ing general departments:

Preparatory Department;

School of Business;

Art Department;

School of Music;

School of Oratory;

College of Liberal Arts;

Graduate Courses;

College of Physicians and Sur-

geons.

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT.

A person fifteen years old, of good


[image: ELLIOTT HALL -- Gymnaisum to the Left.]


moral character, and with sufficient

knowledge to enter the classes organ-

ized, will be admitted to the Prepara-

tory Department. In admitting stu-

dents, the Principal learns, by personal

questions, but without formal examin-

ation, what preparation the candidate

is seeking, and what studies he can

profitable pursue, and assigns him to

classes accordingly. The Principal re-

serves the right of advancing the pupil

or of placing him in lower classes, as

his recitation reveals his needs. Any

person holding a teachers' certificate

[illegible] upon the same. Three

years of preparatory work are now of-

fered. Young people desiring a prepa-

ration for teaching can secure such

special studies as they desire to pur-

sue, while coming in contact with su-

perior teachers, and becoming famil-

iar with the best methods of instruc-

tion. One can save time by entering

our Preparatory Department, where he

can pursue each study demanded for

entrance to the College, and where he

is not required to pursue studies not

needed for admission to the Freshman

class. Besides, young people doing

their preparatory work at Delaware

enjoy many advantages of the Univer-

sity, associate with classmates moving

toward the same goal, and feel the in-

spiration of college life. For special

information concerning the Preparato-

ry Department, address Prof. J.H.

Grove, Principal.

THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Affords an excellent training for a

practical career, and also opportuni-

ties for business training upon the

part of those who are completing the

college courses. It embraces courses

in Bookkeeping, Banking and Business

Practice, Commercial Law, Commer-

cial Arithmetic, Stenography, Type-

writing and Correspondence, Penman-

ship and Telegraphy. The curse of

study is equal to that offered by any

modern business college, and the stu-

dent in addition enjoys all the advan-

tages of the University. This depart-

ment has had a remarkable rapid

growth under its present efficient

Principal and his able corps of five as-

sistants. Many students are here se-

curing rapid preparation at small ex-

pense for successful business careers;

while professional students are secur-

ing that practical training which will

insure them the respect and co-opera-

tion of successful business men. The

department is open throughout the

year, and students can enter it at any

time. For special catalogue and full

particulars address L.L. Hudson, A.

M., Principal, Delaware, O.

THE ART DEPARTMENT

Has been organized recently, and plac-

ed in new quarters especially fitted and

equipped for art work. It embraces

classes in Drawing, Painting, Sketch-

ing, Wood-Carving, China-painting,

Tapestry-painting, and Decorative Art.

The thorough courses in History of

Art offered by the College furnish the

scientific principles for the apprecia-

tiion of the fine arts, and for the tech-

nical work of the Art Department.

These opportunities make the connec-

tiion of the Art Department with the

University of inestimable advantage to

art students. For further information

send for catalogue.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC.

The demands upon music teachers

in the matter of equipment for their

work have been greatly increased

within the past few years; and, in ac-

cordance with the spirit of the times,

the School of Music offers a course of

training which is intended to meet the

most exacting requirements.

In addition to the regular courses of

music study offered, we invite earnest

and candid consideration of the ad-

vantages to be derived by a music

student in pursuing his specialty in

connection with a University, where

art, literature and science blend, rath-

er than in a music school where these

great fields of culture are at best but

indifferently developed. It is the aim

of the School of Music to so arrange

the work that students in all depart-

ments of the University shall con-

stantly intermingle. The collateral

advantages secured to students in

special courses by this plan cannot be

overestimated.

SPECIAL CATALOGUE.

The School issues a special cata-

logue, which will be sent free to any

address on applicaton. This cata-

logue outlines the courses of study in

all branches leading to graduation,

prices of tuition, boarding facilities,

etc. Before deciding upon any other

music school we earnestly advise a

careful perusal of the catalogue of the

School of Music of the Ohio Wesleyan

University.

Address Mark C. Baker, Director,

Delaware, Ohio.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.7)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.7)

Description

[page 7]

[corresponds to page 7 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE-BOARD OF TRADE EDITION. 7

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY.

(CONTINUED.)


[image: MONNETT HALL -- A Home for Young Ladies.]


THE SCHOOL OF ORATORY.

Under the charge of an experienced

Dean and able assistants, offers an ex-

tended and thorough course in all

branches pertaining to the art of ex-

pression. The school seeks attain-

ments rather than numbers. It con-

fers its degrees only upon college grad-

uates, thus maintaining a standard

equal to the highest professional

schools, a standard not maintained by

any other school of oratory in the

land. It aims to fit its pupils for the

large and increasing demand for cul-

tivated teachers of oratory in the

schools and colleges of the land; and

to prepare ministers, lecturers, elocu-

tionists and lawyers for greater influ-

ence and usefulness in the higher

walks of life. The instruction is given

by principles, which are applied from

the first lesson, thus making the stu-

dents' work practical throughout. All

attempts to make form take the place

of fact, and art the place of truth, are

discouraged. The exercises are pre-

scribed for the purpose of freeing na-

ture's avenues of expression, and of

enabling the student to present with

clearness and grace and power the con-

victions which he holds.


[image: MONNETT HALL CORIDOR.]


The School of Oratory has lately

been incorporated as one of the regu-

lar departments of the University.

For details of work address Profess-

or Robert I. Fulton, A.M., Delaware,

Ohio.

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS --

COURSES OF STUDY.

A careful study of the various courses

will show that while the College offers

a large range of electives, yet each

curriculum presents a strong, well-

rounded system of prescribed studies.

All educators advise young people not

to be in such haste in entering upon

technical or professional studies as to

neglect the foundations of culture.

Following the conviction arising from

many years of educational work, and

reinforced by the judgment of others,

the Faculty of the Ohio Wesleyan

University has not made provision for

that superficial education which re-

sults from excessive specialization.

It insists that the graduates of this

University shall lay broad and deep

the foundations of general culture.

Upon the other hand, the University

recognizes the desire of students who

have decided upon their professions,

to select studies which will advance

them in their preparation for profes-

sional careers. Again, elective cours-

es enable students who have not deci-

ded upon professional careers to se-

cure, along with their general studies,

special training in those subjects for

which they have tastes and talents.

The student is expected to spend sev-

enteen hours per week in recitations,

and thus to complete seventeen term

hours of work per term, fifty-one term

hours per year, and two hundred and

four term hours during the college

course.

GRADUATE COURSES.

Our facilities for doing resident

graduate work are not such as to war-

rant us in encouraging college graduates

to come to us for post-graduate in-

struction. In certain cases we mark

out non-resident work leading to the

master's degree for those who have

done their undergraduate work, and

whose general scholarship and capac-

ity for study are such as to warrant

their effort to secure advanced de-

grees. In no case do we grant the

doctorate of philosophy for non-resi-

dent work.

ties.

THE CLEVELAND COLLEGE OF

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.

The College was organized in 1863,

under the title, The Charity Hospital

Medical College. In 1869 the College

became the Medical Department of the

University of Wooster. In 1896, the

College terminated honorable its con-

nection with the University of Woos-

ter, adopted its present name, and be-

came the Medical Department of the

Ohio Wesleyan University.

The most attractive feature of the

College in the eyes of medical stu-

dents has been its clincial advantages.

The Cleveland College of Physicians

land College of Physicians and Sur-

geons. In addition to one hundred

beds fitted up in the rooms for private

patients, the Faculty of the Medical

College receive from twelve to fifteen

thousand patients a year at the Free

Dispensary, which is maintained in

connection with the General Hospital.

The vast advantage of actual practice

for the acquisition of a real knowl-

edge of medicine cannot be overesti-

mated, and the clinical advantages of

and Surgeons, and the other leading

medical school in that large and grow-

ing city, enjoy equal advantages in the

City Hospital of Cleveland. In addi-

tion to these large clinical advantages,

the students in our Medical Depart-

ment enjoy exclusive advantages in

the Cleveland General Hospital, which

is owned by the Faculty of the Cleve-

the Cleveland College of Physicians

and Surgeons are perhaps unsurpassed

by those of any other medical school in

the United States. These advantages

have drawn students from other medi-

cal schools to our College for the last

year of their medical training.

For special catalogue, write to the

Dean, Charles B. Parker, M.D., Cleve-

land, Ohio.

GENERAL INFORMATION -- RELIG-

IOUS LIFE.

The University has held from the

beginning that education demands the

development of all one's powers --

physical, mental and spiritual. The

aim of all true education is to train

young people for their future lives.

Hence any college which does not dis-

tinctly aim at the moral and spiritual

as well as at the mental and physical

development of the students will fail

to fit them for the highest usefulness

and blessedness for time and for eter-

nity. The Ohio Wesleyan University,

therefore, has always aimed to pro-

mote and earnest, noble type of piety.

A large majority of its students are

church members. The chapel services,

the Y.M.C.A. and the Y.W.C.A.,

the Kings' Daughters, class prayer-

meetings, classes for Bible study and

the annual revival services provide for

the spiritual needs of the students, as

the literary societies, lecture courses

and art recitals minister to their in-

tellectual and aesthetic needs. The

Day of Prayer for Colleges is a red-

letter day in the college year. Relig-

ion in the University is natural and

unaffected. Cant and hypocrisy are

almost imposible [page torn] at-

mosphere of student life. The College

constantly strives to develop a prac-

tical type of piety good for seven days

in the week and for twenty-four hours

each day. The constant presentation

of such ideals is of priceless value to

the young.

PHYSICAL TRAINING.

The Gymnasium has been refitted

with shower baths and lockers, and

all the apparatus necessary for class

exercise. It will be thrown open for

the use of students at the beginning

of the winter term. A number of

classes will be organized, and system-

atic exercises given by trained instruc-

tors.

The athletic field is one of the best

in the country, and affords fine facili-

ties for base ball and foot ball prac-

tice.

The Military Department is open to

all young men who desire to elect the

course, but the work is not required of

any.

For catalogue or further information

concerning the University, address

J.W. BASHFORD, President


[image]


CARPENTER & NYE, REAL ESTATE, LOAN AND INSURANCE AGENTS.

Mr. Rufus Carpenter opened this of-

fice in 1888, in connection with Mr.

Walter T. Watson. In 1891, Mr. Wil-

liam C. Nye became his partner.

Mr. Carpenter was born in Franklin

Co., O., in 1835, but has lived in Dela-

ware county since 1864. In 1881 he

was elected Probate Judge, which of-

fice he filled for six years, and in 1898

was elected President of the City

Council, which office he still holds.


[image]


Mr. Nye was born at Tarlton, Pick-

away County, O. Is a graduate of the

Ohio Wesleyan University and of the

Cincinnati Law School, and has been

a resident of Delaware since 1891.

The firm of Carpenter & Nye is well

known among the real estate brokers

of this and other states for their fair

dealings and Christian character.


[image: DR. S. W. FOWLER,]


(Of the firm of Drs. Fowler & Willey.)

The practice of medicine and surge-

ry is a most responsbile one. The re-

lations of mankind with most of the

other professions is simply monetary,

[illegible] practicing physician

there is not only this, but also com-

fort, health, happiness, and even the

life of the patient. Among those to

whom we feel it an honor to refer, we

mention the above physician and

prominent citizen of this city. The

Doctor is wedded to his profession,

and enjoys a successful practice. He

has a fine library, and his office is ful-

ly equipped with every convenience

and appliance in medicine and surgery.

He read medicine with J.W. Res-

sell, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, and gradua-

ted at the Jefferson Medical College at

Philadelphia, Penn., in 1871. He at

once began practice where he is now

located. He is a member of the Dela-

ware County Medical Society, The

Ohio State Medical Society. The

American Medical Association, and

joined the International Medical Con-

gress at Washington, D.C., in 1887.


Prices are reasonable for Tailor-

made Clothing. M. HENRY & SON.


[image: CHARLES W. KNIGHT]


Has practiced law continuously in

Delaware County during the past ten

years. For six years prior he served

as one of the Justices of Delaware

township. He is a native of the coun-

ty, educted in our common schools,

and studied law under the tutorage of

Hon. F.M. Marriott, with whom he is

still associated. Since May, 1898, he

has been Solicitor of Delaware City,

and conducts a general legal practice

throughout the county, with the

strictest fidelity to the interests of his

clients. He is also Librarian of the

Delaware County Law Library Asso-

ciation.


DELAWARE CHURCHES.

BAPTIST.

First Baptist -- North Franklin St.,

between Central avenue and Griswold

St. Organized in 1853. The hand-

some and commodious new brick edi-

ent without a pastor, Rev. Albert Read

having resigned during the past sum-

mer.

Second Baptist -- (colored) -- Ross St.,

between Liberty and Noble Sts. Rev.

Wm. Balay, Pastor. Their comforta-

ble new building was recently decia-

ted.

CATHOLIC.

St. Mary's -- S.W. Corner William

and Henry Sts., Rev. Ph. Steyle, Pas-

tor. Organized in 1835. The present

large and imposing edifice was com-

pleted in 1888. The valuation of the

church property, consisting of church,

school and parsonage, is abut $60,-

000.

EPSICOPAL.

St. Peter's -- Winter St., between

Franklin and Washington. Rev. Eph-

riam Watt, Rector. Organized in 1817.

The present edifice of stone was built

in 1826, but has recently been remod-

eled and the handsome and convenient

Parish House added.

LUTHERAN.

St. John's (English) -- North San-

dusky street, opposite Court House,

Rev. J.F. Shaffer, D.D., Pastor. Or-

ganized in 1885, and fine brick church

edifice was erected the following year.

St. Mark's (German) -- William St.,

between Sandusky and Union Sts.

Rev. J. Sheatsley, Pastor. Organized

in 1852. The commodoius stone edifice

has recently been repaired and im-

proved.

METHODIST.

African -- Cor. Washington and Rail-

road Sts., Rev. John Toney, Pastor.

Organized in 1841. Comfortable brick

edifice.

Asbury -- Cor. Lincoln avenue and

Franklin St. Rev. C. Telford Erick-

son, Pastor. Organized in 1886. The

beautiful and commodious edifice of

stone was completed in 1889.

Grace -- At intersection of William

St. and Central avenue. Rev. E.D.

Smith, Pastor. Organized in 1860.

The present commodious brick edifice

was completed in 1875.

German -- Corner University Ave.

and Washington St. Rev. Frederick

Mersfelder, Pastor. Organized in 1842.

The present brick edifice was erected

in 1854.

Merrick -- Liberty St., between Harri-

son and South Sts. Rev. A.L. Rogers

Pastor.

St. Paul's -- Between University Ave.

and Franklin St. Rev. Carl G. Doney,

Pastor. Organized in 1852. The hand-

some and commodious brick edifice

was completed in 1882.

Trinity (colored) -- Liberty St., be-

tween Ohio and Ross Sts. Rev. H.H.

Renfro, Pastor. The present edifice

was built in 1894.

William Street -- Corner of Franklin

and William Sts. Rev. H.C. Jameson,

Pastor. Organized in 1818. The pres-

ent large and imposing edifice was

completed in 1888.

PRESBYTERIAN.

Delaware Presbyterian -- Corner Win-

ter and washington Sts. Rev. A.D.

Hawn, D.D., Pastor. Organized in

1810. The present commodious and

comfortable edifice of brick was re-

modeled in 1870.

REFORMED.

Zion's -- Corner William and Henry

Sts. Rev. L.B.C. Lahr, Pastor. Or-

ganized in 1837. The present edifice

of brick was erected in 1856.


[image: F. W. ALDEN.]


Above we present a good likeness of

F.W. Alden, Gen. Agt. of the Union

Central Life Insurance Co., of Cincin-

nati, who won considerable distinction

last year by writing the most business

in a territory covering sixteen general

agences. Few men have succeeded

in building up a more substantial Life

Insurance business than Mr. Alden.

He is a hustler, has a first-class com-

pany, and enjoys the confidence of all

who know him, a trio that always

wins. He is actively engaged in

church, temperance and benevolent

work, and is a Trustee of Delaware

City Library, and a Director of the

Citizens' Telephone Co. Persons de-

siring first-class insurance will do well

to consult him.


[image: DR. O.W. BONNER.]


O. W. Bonner, M.D., has practiced

medicine in Delaware county since

1892. Was born in Licking County,

and moved with his parents to Mor-

row County when 3 years old. Re-

ceived his early education in Sparta

High School and Norm [illegible] Be-

gan the study of medicine in 1888; at-

tended Western Reserve University,

Cleveland, O., and Columbus Medical

College, graduating from the latter in

1892. Is a member of Delaware Coun-

ty Medical Society, and U.S. Examin-

ing Surgeon Board at Delaware.


[image: DEWITT C. LUGENBEEL.]


Mr. DeWitt C. Lugenbeel may well

be considered the Historian of Dela-

ware. He is probably more familiar

with the early history of our county,

and the doings of our pioneers, than

any other living person. With him,

research into the doings of our pio-

neers, and tracing their descendants,

is a labor of love. For several years

he has been engaged in preparing a

number of very interesting papers,

entitled "Looking Backward," which

have appeared in the Delaware Herald.

Mr Lugenbeel was born in Maryland,

but has lived nearly all his life an

honored and esteemed citizen of Del-

aware county. During the war of the

rebellion, he enlisted for the defense

of the Union, and served his country

well and faithfully.


Fine Merchant Tailoring by

MARTIN HENRY & SON.


"Attractiveness of Art."

Fred Bartholmew,

CARRIAGE SIGN PAINTER.

I will guarantee every job I

turn out to be strictly first-

class in all respects. I have

painted some of the most at-

tractive signs in Delaware

city Prices reasonable

32 East Winter St. Shop formerly

occupied by C.F. Draher.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.8)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.8)

Description

[page 8]

[corresponds to page 8 of the Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette.
DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


8 DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.


THE BIG FOUR SHOPS.

THE C.C.C. & ST. L. RAILWAY'S EXTENSIVE WORKS

A GREAT BENEFIT TO DELAWARE.

LOCOMOTIVES, PASSENGER COACHES AND FREIGHT CARS ARE BUILT AND REPAIRED -- INTEREST-

ING DESCRIPTION OF THE PLANT -- TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY MEN EMPLOYED.


[image: SHOPS, YARDS AND PASSENGER STATION.]


Among the largest and most active

industries of Delaware, and one which

probably contributes more to the

financial welfare of the laboring class

than any other, is the C.C.C. & St. L.

Railway, or Big Four shops, now un-

der the careful superintendency of

the Company's skilled Master Mechan-

ic, Mr. Mason Rickert.

These shops cover a large space of

ground just north of Central avenue,

and east of Lake street, and comprise

eight separate buildings, each depart-

ment being separated from the others

in such a manner as not to interfere

with their respective duties, and at

[illegible] direct communi-

cation for the convenient interchange

of labor and material.

The main building, a large brick

structure, contains the four depart-

ments, Machinery, Boiler, Smith and

Tin, besides the engine room, con-

taining two immense boilers, which

furnish the propelling power for the

heavy machinery, as well as steam

heat for all the shop buildings and the

passenger depot.

THE MACHINERY DEPARTMENT,

which is under the direct supervision

of Mr. M. Anderson, the courteous

General Foreman, and his two able as-

sistants, Messrs. Fred Lugger and Jas.

Fahey, with its many whirling wheels,

huge machines, and clatter of hammer

and chisel, always presents a scene of

activity. Here locomotives are be-

ing built, overhauled and repaired

constantly, the most interesting case

in hand at present being the building

of a new locomotive, which, when it

makes its debut in the course of ten

days or two weeks, will be known as

engine No. 122. The engine is a credit

to those in charge of the work, and is

expected to make very fast time with

a heavy train. No. 122 will be an

8-wheel passenger engine, with 58-

inch boiler, cylinders 18 x 24 inchees,

and driving wheels 5 ft. 4œ in, in di-

ameter. It will be fully equipped with

automatic couplers and air brakes, a

No. 9 Monitor and a No. 9 Mack in-

jector, and the latest pattern of the

Nathan Triple-feed lubricator. In ad-

dition to the above, the engine will be

equipped with the Curtis automatic

sanding apparatus, and an automatic

air bell-ringer, both of which are op-

erated by a simple "turn of the but-

ton" by the engineer from his seat in

the cab.

In this department the air brakes of

all classes of equipment, so necessary

to the safety of employes and the

traveling classes, are looked after by

competent hands who are required to

pass an annual examination in order

to hold the position. Car and locomo-

tive wheels are changed, bolts cut and

threaded, brasses turned up, and heavy

pieces of iron and steel planed, bored

and made ready, each for its particular

use.

Passing to the next room, we come

to

THE BOILER DEPARTMENT.

where, under the supervisiion of fore-

man Chas. Kraus and his assistants,

huge boilrs and fire boxes are prepar-

ed for the locomotives, two large fire

boxes being under curse of construc-

tion at present. In this department

smokestacks of locomotives and count-

less numbers of boiler tubes or flues

are being prepared for use annually.

Passing on around, we find conve-

nient to this department,


[image: MASON RICKERT, MASTER MECHANIC]


THE BLACKSMITH DEPARTMENT,

where, under the direction of foreman

Frank Peck, we find men busy with

hammer and sledge, converting shape-

less masses of iron and steel into most

essential parts of both cars and loco-

motives, as also doing all the general

work known in the art of smithing.

An especially interesting sight in the

evening are the red-hot furnaces, and

the smiths handling and welding the

large locomotive frames, each weigh-

ing 3,000 pounds, and putting them in

readiness for their respective purposes.

In this same building we find

THE TIN AND PIPE FITTING DE-

PARTMENT,

under the direction of foreman Fred

Heilman, where the men are busily

engaged in the manufacture of lamps,

buckets, oil cans, torches, packing,

etc., and also doing a general line of

repairing and refitting.

THE COACH DEPARTMENT,

under the management of foreman Ja-

cob Eichhorn, occupies three separate

buildings. Here the parlor, coach,

baggage and mail cars, after a number

of months' service, are brought to be

overhauled, cleaned, all defective

parts removed and replaced by new,

and the cars put in first-class condi-

tion, a number of them being practi-

cally new when they are again allowed

to leave the shop for service.

In one building, the planing, match-

ing, mortising and metal cleaning and

polsihing is done; while in a second

building the fitting and erection of

work is going on; and in the third the

overhauling and repairs to the trucks

of cars is done. Locomotive pilots and

cabs are also made in the former of

these buildings. And in connection

with this is the

UPHOLSTERING DEPARTMENT,

where, under the direction of foreman

H.G. Thomas, the chairs, cushions,

and backs and seats of parlor cars and

coaches are made as comfortable as

possible for the traveling public. In

this department engine and caboose

cushions are also made; curtains of

all classes of equipment cleaned and

repaired, and plush, after becoming

worn and travel-stained, is dyed and

again made presentable by the steam

process. After leaving the hands of

the repair men and the upholsterers,

the cars are turned over to

THE PAINT DEPARTMENT.

Here, under the supervision of fore-

man Chas. Becker, a force of twenty-

five men are kept busy at burning off-

the old paint, painting, cleaning and

varnishing the cars. This force puts

out an average of eight or nine passen-

ger cars per month, besides doing a

good business in the painting of

freight cars and locomotives, and pre-

sents quite a hiave of industry in it-

self.

THE FREIGHT CARE DEPARTMENT.

This department is under the imme-

diate direction of foreman S.L. Farm-

er, and has principally to do with the

re-building, repairing, inspection and

oiling of all freight equipment for cars

belonging to foreign roads as well as

to the Big Four which arrive at this

point. An average of about five hun-


[F. B. KARL, images: STOVES TINWARE

and .....

HOUSE FURNISHING.

This large establishment

is probably the best known

of any of its kind in Del-

aware County. Mr. Karl,

the proprietor, established

his present business in

1888. He now occupies

a two story building

20 x 100 in dimensions and

employes 10 men in carry-

ing on his extensive busi-

ness. A specialty is made

of Roofing, Spouting and

Plumbing, and the putting

in of Heating Plants which

has done much to gain

for him his wide and fav-

orable reputation. Mr.

Karl's motto is

First-Class Goods

at .....

Reasonable Prices.]


dred freight cars are repaired and

again turned into service by this de-

partment every month, besides the

building and repairing of locomotive

tenders, which is also assigned to this

branch.

THE ENGINE HOUSE DEPART-

MENT.

Is under the charge of foreman P.

Egan and J.J. O'Connor. In this de-

partment the cleaning, inspection and

washing out of locomotives is looked

after, as also the handling, transfer-

ring and preparing of them for their

respective service.

THE LABORING GANG,

Under the leadership of foreman Geo.

Mulholland, act as aids-de-camp to all

departments, and also serve as mem-

bers of the wrecking crew.

THE OFFICE AND STOREROOM

DEPARTMENT

Are under the immediate direction of

Mr. Geo. C. Hipple, the efficient Divi-

sion Clerk, and has principally to do

with the clerical work, and the hand-

ling of the large amount of supplies

necessary to carry in the conducting

of business.

250 MEN EMPLOYED.

These shops furnish employment to

nearly twon hundred and fifty men, and

taken as a whole, are a very business-

like as well as interesting place, and

occupies a very prominent place in the

make-up of our city.


[image: ATTORNEY GEO. COYNER.]

Mr. Geo. Coyner, Delaware County's

present Prosecutor, was born in Vir-

ginia. At the close of the civil war

he moved with his father to Eden, this

county, where he has resided ever

since, until moving to the city of Del-

[line torn] upon obtain-

ing his majority. Mr. Coyner was

elected to the office of Township Clerk,

which position he occupied for five

consecutive years. He was then ap-

pointed Superintendent of the Dela-

ware County Infirmary, which position

he filled for four years. He then devo-

ted his attention to the completion of

his law course which he accomplished

in 1893 by graduating from the Cincin-

nati Colleg of Law, and in 1894 was elected to hs present position of Pros-

ecutor. As a lawyer, the success he

has achieved is his greatest commen-

dation.


[image: DLEAWARE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.]


The first Presbyterian Church in

Delaware was organized under the au-

thority of the Presbytery of Chilli-

cothe, by Rev. Joseph S. Hughs, in

1810, with a membership of fourteen

members. Mr. Hughs was its pastor

for thirteen years, and was suceeded

in 1824 gby Rev. Henry Van Deman. In

1838, during Mr. VanDeman's pastor-

ate, the division occurred between the

Old and New School Presbyterians. In

1841 fifty-four members left the First

church, and organized the Second,

Mr. VanDeman continuing pastor of

the former, or old school, until 1861,

hwere he resigned, a ministry extend-

ing over thirty-seven years.

REv. Franklin Putnam was the first

pastor of the Second church. he was

succeeded by Rev. Joseph F. Tuttle in

1845; Rev. Charles Torrey from 1845

to 1850; Rev. G. Dana till 1852; Rev. C

H. DeLong till 1885. Rev. O.H. New-

ton was pastor from 1855 to 1869.

On the reunion of the two schools in

the General Assembly in 1869, the two

Delaware churches took steps for a re-

union, and in June, 1870, the Delaware

Presbyterian Church was organized out

of the two churches by an act of the

Legislature. The building on Winter

street, between Sandusky and Frank-


[image: Job Printing

at the

Gazette Office.]


lin, worshipped in by the congrega-

tion of the Second church for twenty-

eight years, was sold, and the united

congregations occupied the First

church building. Rev. C.W. Matter

filled the pulpit of the First church

church building. Rev. C.W. Mateer

Millen succeeded him, and resigned in

1867. Rev. J. Lower was then stated

supply for one year, and was followed

by Rev. David Kingery, who served the

church till 1869.

In February, 1870, Rev. R.F. Mc-

Laren became pastor of the united

congregations, and resigned in 1873.

He was succeeded by Rev. N.S. Smith,

who remained until 1878. During his

pastorate, the church building was re-

modeled and improved at a cost of

$12,000. Rev. A.D. Hawn, D.D., was

called to the pastorate, in December,

1878, and entered upon his duties the

following January, which he has ably

and acceptably performed ever since.

Under his charge, the church

has prospered spiritually and tempo-

raly, and the congregation is one of

the largest and strongest in the city.

The substantial brick edifice, as

shown in the above engraving, is com-

modious and comfortable, and a credit

to the city.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.9)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.9)

Description

[page 9]

[corresponds to page 13 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE--BOARD OF TRACE EDITION. 13


[image: HON. J. D. VANDEMAN,]


Attorney-at-Law, was born in Dela-

ware, Ohio, Feb. 12th, 1832, son of

Rev. Henry and Sarah VanDeman; his

father a native of Pennsylvania; his

mother of Kentucky. Mr. VanDeman

was admitted to the Delaware Bar in

1854m having graduated at O. W. U. in

1851. He served as Prosecuting Attor-

ney of the county for two terms, and

has had a most successful career as an

attorney. He was a director and one

of the organizers of the C. H. V. & T.

Ry. Co., and has since its organization

been counsel for that road. He has

retired from active practice of law,

but is yet President of the Fidelity

Loan Co., Vice President and Director

of the First National Bank, and Pres-

ident of the Board of Trustees of the

Diocese of Southern Ohio.

In 1898 he was Republican candidate

for Judge in this Judicial Circuit, and

very largely reduced the district's

heavy Democratic majority.

Mr. VanDeman lives in his beautiful

home on North Sandusky street, (a

picture of which residence appears in

this edition,) and is now enjoying

the fruits of his labors of early years.

THE CITY SCHOOLS.

AN INTERESTING REVIEW OF THE LAST FORTY YEARS OF THEIR

EXISTENCE.

Perhaps there is no better way to

estimate the growth and advancement

of our fair city, than by looking back-

ward for the last forty years, and no-

ting the requirements and facilities

for school purposes at that period,

and comparing them with the present

equipment and advantages. Progress

has quietly and steadily been made.

As accommodations became restrict-

ed, new quarters and buildings have

been furnished. In the summer of

1861, "Old Central" was completed,

and in September of that year was

first occupied. Nothing can be said in

praise of the building or location. It

was simply a demand and a supply.

All the children north of Spring St.,

to the western and northern limits of

the corporation, and for some distance

east over the river, were crowded

within its rooms, which numbered on-

ly six at first. In 1874, the wings on

the east and west were built up, add-

ing two rooms, and when, in '83,

while plans were being formulated for

the present High School, the over-

crowded conditions demanded more

room, the frame building on the west

came quickly into existence, and ser-

ved the higher grades until the High

School was ready for occupancy, Jan.

1, 1886.

In 1865, two rooms in a small frame

house, were all that East Delaware

could boast of for school purposes.

The North had no building at that

time. The South were quartered in

three rooms of the old academy, and

an additional colored school of one or

two rooms in a brick building near by

The North building was erected in the

late sixties, the East building follow-

ing soon after, and some years later,

when greatly straitened for room, the

South building was planned and com-

pleted.

There were heroic men on the Board

at that time, who against adverse crit-

icism, persisted in carrying out their

plans in giving that part of the town

the best of all the buildings used for

school purposes. The wisdom of the

board was long since acknowledged,

and a building fair to look upon, with

neat and pleasant surroundings, has

for years been shedding an uncon-

scious influence upon that part of the

town. The North building has under-

gone changes, being nearly rebuilt in

'88, and since, has enlarged its accom-

modations. South Delaware, too, has

added rooms for the increased attend-

ance.

The School Board through all these

years has been made up of the repre-

sentative men of Delaware, who, with

scarcely a single exception, have been

men of broad ideas and wide sympa-

thies, untiringly giving of time and

thought and service for the welfare of

our schools. Rev. O.H. Newton, H.M.

Carper and Mr. Henry Eaton were the

men comprising the Board in "65. For

more than a score of years, Prof. W.G.

Williams was a member of the Board,

[illegible] it his culture and maturi-

ty of thought, which was ever like a

benediction in its influence. With him

was associated for a number of years,

Dr. T.B. Williams, who always had a

kind word or smile for teacher or pu-

pil, and whose sympathies were as

broad as humanity's needs. Mr. Jas.

Barnes -- with an ever abiding interest

in the schools. Dr. Hyatt served one

term faithfully and well, and Mr. E.E.

Neff gave untiring service for several

terms. Mr. Cyrus Platt, the faithful

Christian gentleman, was a member of

the Board a number of years, and all

will recall Mr. Samuel Lybrand, who

passed out of this life while a member

of the Board. Those serving during

later years are all well known in Dela-

ware as men of character and ability,

looking well after the best interests of

our schools.

Of the six superintendents since the

opening of "Old Central" in 1861, the

office for the first two years was filled

by a Mr. Banks, followed in the two

succeeding years by Mr. William Car-

ter, father of our well known citizen,

Mr. George H. Carter. In September,

1865, Rev. J.S. Campbell came into our

schools from Charleston, Clark county,

where he head served a few years as

superintendent. The citizens who can

recall the school life of the pas thir-

ty-five years, know well the sure,

steady progress of our schools. Mr.

Campbell was a conservative man,

never adopting new measures because

of popularity but, instead, always

looked after the things and methods

which would conserve the best inter-

ests of all. To his teachers he always

emphatically said: "The schools are

for the children," and so their good

was paramount to all else. The pu-

pils loved and respected him. He was

firm and just, but kind in all his in-

tercourse with them and; so after the

school life was done, and many had

found homes elsewhere, no visit to

Delaware was complete until their

teacher of former years had been

sought cut and thanked for his pains-

taking care and instruction. The last

years of his life were marked with a

growing tenderness and regard for

friends and all connected with the

schools. He resigned his position the

last of January, 1891 and on March

4th following he passed from the ac-

tive scenes of life here, to enter upon

the employments and enjoyments of

the life beyond, and where he again

met those of the "lost and gone,"

teachers and pupils, with whose life he

had been associated here.

The scores of teachers that have

been connected with our schools can

not be mentioned here. Some have

"passed on," and joined loved pupils


..SMITHS'..

Clothing House

CAN'T GIVE CLOTHES AWAY,

But they come as near to it as the law allows. The DEAL

SQUARELY and REPRESENT their CLOTHING exactly as it is.

It will pay you to deal with A SQUARE HOUSE.

They Have the Largest Stock.

They Have the Lowest Price.

It is not the man who yells the loudest who has the most melo

dious voice and the firm that has the biggest advertisement does

NOT always sell the best or cheapest.

Clothing, Gent's Furnishings,

Hats, Gaps, Etc.

That are CHEAP enough and also insure that most important quali-

ty, CORRECT STYLE and SERVICEABLENESS, try

Smiths' Clothing House,

SIGN OF THE "BEAR"

[image]

and superintendent in that land where

there is no parting. Some have given

long years of service, Miss Hannah M.

Pierce spending twenty-two of the best

years of her life as Principal of the

High School, giving of the best things

of her noble Christian nature to her

pupils, taking the deepest interest in

their temporal, intellectual and spirit-

ual welfare, is still in another sphere

of Christian work for the benefit of

others. Miss Eliza Grove was an un-

tiring, enthusiastic, thorough teacher

for many years, always giving the best

of herself, and gaining the love and

esteem of her pupils. Mrs. M.A. Car-

der has taught many years, and is a

very successful teacher in the Primary

grade. Of those giving years of faith-

ful service, may be mentioned Miss

Ginevra Humphries, so capable in

drawing and music, and who for many

years gave instruction in writing. Al-

so Mrs. Drake, Mrs. Widman, Miss

Crickard, Miss Pratt, Miss Palmer,

Miss Oldham, Miss McCann and Miss

Latham and Miss Estill have good

time-serving records. Mrs. M.J. Pow-

ers, the pioneer teacher, is filling out

her thirty-fifth year in the Primary

Grade. Mention should be made of

Miss Wharton, long connected with

the schools, gentle, refined, and every

Christian, almost gave up her life in

the school room, living but a few days

after resigning. Good mention might

be made of every teacher, but there is

not time nor room. Their works tes-

tify of their ability and faithfulness.

The pupils of our schools are in all

parts of our broad land, and some in

the far-off lands beyond the seas.

Many business men of our town were

former pupils, and some in many plac-

es are occupying high positions. The

influence of our schools will last for-

ever. May it ever be for the highest

good of all coming within its power.


[image: EDWARD T. HUMES.]


The subject of this sketch is strict-

ly a Delaware county boy, born in

Brown township, March 7,1872. His

education was obtained in the public

schools of the county, with the excep-

tion of his legal training, which was

obtained at the Cincinnati Law

School. Admitted to the bar on June

7, 1898, and immediately opened an of-

fice in this city, where by strict atten-

tion to business, he has established a

growing practice.

Satisfaction guaranteed in fit, style,

and finish of clothing.

MARTIN HENRY & SON.

W. R. Carpenter,

Proprietor

of

Livery and

Feed Stables,

And Dealers in

ALL KINDS OF SEED.

Nos. 17 & 19 W. William Street

Half Square W. City Hall.

Both 'Phones No. 23.

DELAWARE . . . OHIO.

[image]


[image: A.J. AREHART, TRANSFER.

PIANOS AND FURNITURE CAREFULLY MOVED.

OFFICE 58 NORTH MAIN ST. TELEPHONE NO. 71]

Office at

F.B. KARL'S HARDWARE STORE.

The A.J. Arehart

Transfer.

58 N. Sandusky St.,

Delaware, - Ohio.

All Class of Transfer Work Done on Short Notice.


BARGDILL & LAWSON

REAL ESTATE

LOAN AND

... INSURANCE ...

5 PER CENT.

MONEY TO LOAN.

Houses for Rent. Bargains in Farm

Property. A good list of city Prop-

erties for sale or exchange. For in-

formation drop a line.

BARGDILL & LAWSON

NO. 6½ N. SANDUSKY ST.,

Delaware, Ohio,


HOFFMAN.

[image]

The word implies all that is desirable in Baker's Goods, such as PIES

CAKES, BUNS, FANCY COOKING and BREAD. As to

CONFECTIONERY

Hoffman is without a rival. His ICE CREAM is appreciated and

purchased by the elite of Delaware and surrounding cities. ALWAYS

A FRESH LINE OF CANDIES. The place to get it is

GEO. J. HOFFMAN'S,

WEST WINTER STREET.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.10)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.10)

Description

[page 10]

[corresponds to page 14 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


14 DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.

BEAUTIFUL OAK GROVE CEMETERY


[image: ENTRANCE AND SUPERINTENDENT'S HOUSE AND OFFICE.]

The Cemetery is situated on South

Sandusky street, and was purchased

by a committee composed of Dr. R.

Hills, Benj. Powers, James Eaton, D.

F. McCullough and C.C. Chamber-

lain in the year 1850.

On July 13, 1850, articles of associa-

tion were adopted and signed by R.

Hills, C.C. Chamberlain, D.F. Mc-

Cullough, James Eaton, B. Powers, T.

W. Powell, R.N. Jones, Geo. F. Stay-

man, C. Hills, C. Platt, E. Moore, S.

Rheem, A.A. Welch, Hosea Williams,

and S. Littell; and on August 10, 1850,

by Geo. W. Campbell, George Little,

W.s. Little, M.L. Griffin, G.W. Stark,

H. VanHorn, Asahel Welch and S.

Finch.

At this meeting, August 10, 1850, Dr.

R. Hills, C.C. Chamberlain, James

Eaton, B. Powers and D.F. McCul-


[image: CHAPEL]


lough were elected Trustees of the

Association, and C. Platt Clerk.

This Board was subsequently fur-

ther organized by the election of Dr.

R. Hills as President, and Benjamin

Powers as Treasurer.

A resolution was adopted to organ-

ize the Association under the general

act of the Legislature, characterizing

Cemetery Associations, dated Febru-

ary 24, 1848.

A Constitution and By-Laws were

adopted. The land was purchased of

Mr. Kinlourne for the sum of $1,550.

The Board decided upon borrowing


[image: VALLEY ROAD LOOKING WEST.]


the sum necessary to meet the first

payment of purchase money, and with

which to commence improvements.

They also decided to improve and

dedicate only about thirty acres at

present, it being the northern portion

of the tract.

R. Hills, T.W. Powell, James Ea-

ton and D.F. McCullough were ap-

pointed a committee to lay out the

grounds into sections, lots, carriage

avenues, walks, etc. With the assist-

ance of other members of the Board,

and other gentlemen and ladies of

taste and judgment, this was done,

and such other important improve-

ments made by the summer of 1851,

that they were considered in readiness

for a formal deciation to the purpose

designed.

The impressive ceremony of dedica-

tion was held in the grove in the

northwestern portion of the grounds,

at 10 o'clock on Thursday morning,

July 20, 1851. The day was a beauti-

ful one, and the concourse of citizens

large and appreciative.

The Cemetery was afterwards deed-

ed to the city on April 14th, 1863, and

was managed by a committee from the

council until 1887, when the following

Trustees of advanced ideas were elect-

ed, in April, 1887; V.T. Hills, John

W. Watkins, H.J. McCullough, and

they appointed David Grinton, a land-

scape gardner, the present Superin-

tendent and Secretary.

The present officers and Trustees are

Dr. E.M. Hall, President, D.d. Beck,

Vice President, and R.J. Cox, Treas-

urer, all men of progressive thought

in regard not only to the cemetery,

but also in matters pertaining to the

welfare of the city.

Each successive Board has given

great attention to the development of

the Cemetery, and have carefully

studied the general contour of the

grounds, and the plans developed to

bring out the beauties and hide the

deformities, or make them into at-

tractive features, from their singular-

ity.

The Cemetery contains nearly 90

acres, and is laid out on the lawn plan.

The price of lots arelow, taking into

consideratin that each lot sold is

placed under perpetual care. This

plan was adopted since 1897.

A handsome little chapel is near the

entrace, where the service are held,

and the valut is in the rear, divided

by an iron door. The floor is covered

with the best quality of linoleum;

seats are provided; an organ; and

heated by gas. A hearse is also kept

on the grOunds for removing the re-

mains from the vault to the grave;

the broad roads are well kept up, and

the lakes have been made out of waste

low ground, and in the near future it

would be a good thing to drill for a

flowing well, as experts are of the idea

that one could be had without much

expense, and it would be on incalcula-

ble value to the grounds.

The Trustees have a perpetual care

fund. A certain percentage of the pro-

ceeds of the sale of lots is placed in

so that the barns are no longer an

eye-sore on the grounds, and we be-

lieve that our Cemetery will compare

favorable with any town of the same

size in Ohio.

ST. MARY'S CEMETERY.

This new Cemetery lies south of Oak

Grove, divided by a lane one rod wide.

It was purchased by Rev. Ph. Steyle,

the REctor, about two years ago, and

was laid off in lots 20 x 20, and about a

month ago, a large, fine Celtic cross of

Indiana limestone, excquisitely carved,

was erected there. It comprises about

eight acres.


IF..

you do any driving get

the best rig in town. I keep

The Finest Rigs.

The Finest Horses.

Rubber Tired Phaetons

Buggies

and

Closed

Carriages.

Wedding parties and Funerals

looked after carefully.

Rig Hire REasonable.

O.E. McFarlin,

28 S. Sandusky St.,

'Phone 117. Delaware, Ohio.


GO TO THE

GAZETTE OFFICE

FOR

JOB PRINTING

OF ALL KINDS.


[image: WATER LILY POND AND RUSTIC BRIDGE -- VALLEY ROAD LOOKING WEST.]


H.J. McCULLOUGH & CO. DEALERS IN ... LUMBER.


[IMAGE]


This business was

established in 1853

by Mr. David F.

McCullough, father

of the members of

the present firm.....

Since his death, in

1863, the business

has been conducted

by Messrs. H.J. &

J.E. McCullough,

who own the prem-

ises occupied by their

business; fronting ...

212 feet on East

Winter Street and

212 feet back from

Winter on North

Henry Street, direct-

ly opposite the Co-

lumbus, Sandusky &

Hocking Freight De-

pot and Yards. Their

present office, ware-

house and main shed

as shown in the ac-

companying cuts,....

was built in 1892,

and covers a space 52 x 198 feet. They always have in this shed a large stock of Dry Lumber
worked into

Drop Siding, Shiplap Siding, Flooring, Ceiling, Partition, Window and Door Jambs, Plain and
Fancy Casing and Base.

besides a general line of surface boards, &c., in all grades: also, a full assortment of
plain and moulded doors and regular sized window sash with

facilities for getting out odd sizes on short notice. In their warehouse they have good
brands of Calcine Plaster, Portland and Louisville Cements.

Smaller sheds shelter their stock of Plastering Lath and various kinds of Shingles,
while out in their Yard is a complete line of rough studding, joist, etc., etc.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.11)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.11)

Description

[page 11]

[corresponds to page 15 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION. 15

THE CITY SCHOOLS.

[image: DELWARE HIGH SCHOOL]

Another article gives the history of

the schools of our city, this article

presents their present aims and pur-

poses.

Below is reproduced a part of the

last annual report to the State Com-

missioner of Common Schools:

Enumeration of youth between

6 and 21 years ............ 2,301

Total enrollment last year .. 1,572

Monthly enrollment .......... 1,278

Average Daily attendance .... 1,167

No. of school sites ......... 5

No. of school buildings ..... 8

Value of school property ....$165,000

No. of teachers to supply school 39

I also append items from the last

monthly report of the High School:

Total enrollment ............ 238

Monthly enrollment .......... 224

Average daily attendance .... 218

No. of outside pupils enrolled 26

No. of graduates last year .. 25

No. in present Senior class . 27

No. of teachers in High School 6

In American we are proud of the pub-

lic school. Not only are we proud of

it, but on it, next to the family, do we

base our hope of national well-being.

It trains for citizenship. Its business

is to give the youth of the land ideals

that will uplift them, and make them

better citizens than their parents and

teachers have been. And as we trace

the history of the public school,

whether in the country at large, or in

our own city, we feel that our hope is

not baseless. The public school is in-

creasingly accomplishing its mission.

It is keeping pace with advancing cul-

ture. It is constantly adapting itself

to the changing conditions of our

broadening national life.

But the school must be more than a

preparation for life. It holds in its

keeping, concurrently with the home,

twelve years of the child's life. It

must live that life itself with the

child. Its training must not be simply

that of the intellect. It must train the

hand and the heart as well. The

school must see to it that in this school

life the child meets problems, intellect-

ual, moral and physical, whose solu

tion will make him stronger in all

these lines. This is not accomplished

by seeing to it that the child gets


[image: HORACE A. STOKES, SUPT]


through the schools on flowery beds

of ease. If school life is to be a prep=

aration for real life, the child must

solve his own problems in the recita-

tion and on the playground. He must

meet difficulties and overcome them.

He must learn self-control and self-di-

rection [torn page]

the strength of his mental and moral

muscles.

We feel that the schools of Dela-

ware represent such a conception of

education, and that parents, teachers

and children are all working to ac-

complish this end. We believe that

strength lies in progress along con-

servative lines. We care not to ac-

cept the new in education, simply be-

cause it is new, nor to discard the old

because it is old; but holding to that

which has been tested by experience

and found good, we keep our minds

open to receive that in the new educa-

tion which proves its right to recog-

nition.

The best results come from a co-op-

eration of patrons and teachers in the

great work of training the children.

For several years it has been the con-

stant endeavor of the school authori-

ties to enlist the interest and help of

the citizens. And we feel that the

closer sympathy that has arisen be-

tween patrons and teachers has had

its effect in making all phases of our

school work more efficient. There is

noticeably a growth in that self-con-

trol and self-direction that makes for

strong manhood and womanhood. This

improvement is especially marked in

the higher grades, where it should

naturally come. The result shows us

that education is something more

than intellectual training, and that

education, in the widest meaning of

the term, is a result of the united ef-

fort of all the forces and influences in

our city that make for higher thought

and higher endeavor.

BOARD OF EDUCATION

N.F. Overturf, President.

J.S. Jones, Clerk.

J.M. Crawford.

CITY TEACHERS.

Horace A. Stokes, Superintendent.

Genevra Humphrey, Music and

Drawing

HIGH SCHOOL

Ida M. Windate, Principal.

Mattie Palmer, Mabel Cratty, Emily

Brooke, Arabella C. Dackerman, Ho-

mer LeSourd.

A GRAMMER.

Lulu Oldham, Emma McCann, Grace

Carver.

WEST BUILDING.

Mary L. Pratt, Principal.

Clara Graham, Stella Cone, Ella

Stokes, Jennie Walker, Mattie Ken-

yon, Blanche Harmon, Alice Estill,

Mary J. Powers.

SOUTH BUILDING.

Henry T. Main, Principal.

Laura Woodward, Mary LeMaster,

Hattie Jackson, Mrs. A.M. Drake, El-

la Marsh, Jeannette Lathan.

EAST BUILDING.

R.L. Plotner, Principal.

Carrie Hamilton, Kate Root, Minnie

Duckworth, Marion Brown, Mary A.

Carder.

NORTH BUILDING.

Lyda Crickard, Principal.

Martha Westfall, Catherine Chubb,

Nellie Williams, Helen Parsons, Em-

ma C. Widman.

T.F. Bailey, Truant Officer.

JANITORS.

High School -- W.A. Greiner.

West Building -- Thomas Kemper.

South Building -- Henry Clay.

East Building -- Wm. A. Johnson.

North Building -- R. Warren.


[image: MAJ. F.T. EVANS]


is one of the leading members of the

secret order fraternity of this city, be-

longing to eighteen different orders;

he holds many positions of honor and

trust besides having some forty mem-

orized parts in the work. He has

been Assistant Quartermaster General

in the First Brigade of Ohio P.M.I.

O.O.F., for the past six years, and

has been the Quartermaster of the

First Regiment, Ohio Brigade, U.R.K.

of P. for the past eight years, having

visited most every large city in this

and adjoining states in an official ca-

pacity.


DISTANCES FROM DELAWARE

TO OTHER POINTS IN THE COUNTY.

Miles.

Ashley, N .................. 10

Olive Green, N.E. .......... 13

Eden P.O., (Kilbourne) N.E. 5

Eden Sta., P.O. (Leonardsburg)

N.E. ..................... 7

Sunbury, E. ................ 12

Berkshire, E. .............. 9

Alum Creek, E. ............. 5

Galena, S.E. ............... 10

Potter, N.E. ............... 10

Center Village, S.E. ....... 18

Lewis Center, S.E. ......... 8

West Berlin, S.E. .......... 4

Cheshire, S.E. ............. 8

Powell, S. ................. 10

Hyattville, S. ............. 5

Girls' Industrial Home, S.W. 9

Bellepoint, S.W. ........... 5

Warrensburg, W. ............ 5

Radnor, N.W. ............... 8

Ostander, W. ............... 8

White Sulphur, W. .......... 5

Norton, N. ................. 8

Stratford, S. .............. 3

Troyton, N. ................ 6

Magnetic Springs, W. ....... 12


DELAWARE'S

RAILWAYS.

Delaware possesses transportation

facilities second to but few inland

cities in Ohio. The various lines cen-

tering here are the Big Four, the

Hocking Valley and the Columbus,

Sandusky and Hocking.

The Big Four, which has here ex-

tensive shops, yards, and round house,

has three entraces: from Cleveland,

114 miles, with 6 passenger trains in

each direction; from Cincinnati, 150

miles, via Columbus, 24 miles, 6 pass-

enger trains; from Springfield, 50

miles, 2 passenger trains.

The Hocking Valley has 4 passenger

trains to Toledo, 100 miles, and 4 to

Columbus, 24 miles, and 2 to Pomeroy,

[illegible]

The Columbus, Sandusky & Hocking

runs 3 passenger trains to Sandusky,

86 miles, and 3 to Columbus, 24 miles.

All these line run numerous fast

freight trains, and the Hocking Val-

ley, and Columbus, Sandusky and

Hocking run directly to the finest bit-

uminous coal fields in the state, those

of the Hocking Valley, which insures

Delaware cheap cola of the best quali-

ty.


NEVER FORGET.

Thousands of former students of the

O.W. University, while here, learned

to like the refreshing and health-giv-

ing waters of the beautiful White

Sulphur Spring on the University

Campus, and are often possessed of a

great longing for another drink of it,

and sometimes a journey is taken to

Delaware for the purpose of again ex-

periencing its delights. A wealthy

gentleman who had attended the O.W.

U. for a year when a youth, told the

writer that he considered the Campus

spring the grandest in the world, and

that he often had a great longing for

a generous drink of it. He said the

people of Delaware have a priceless

treasure in this sulphur spring.


[image: DR. J.F. JONES, The Osteopath.]


Osteopathists claim that the body is

a mass of live electrical wires, each

with a special function, and that one

disarrangement of these will cause

havoc, and an expert electrician (Os-

teopath) is needed to set it aright.

The fluids of the body are a great

drainage system, with feed and waste

pipes. A defective supply to a part,

or improper drainage of another will

cause stagnation or disease.

An Osteopath can readily discover

and remedy these evils without drugs

or the knife.

With what ease does the osteopath

soothe a nerve and stop pain; acceler-

ate or lessen the flow of life-giving

fluids in a certain part, or slip a part

of the bony structure back into place.

The evidence is startling, and appears

nothing short of wonderful. An ef-

fect is accomplished almost immedi-

ately that would perhaps require a

drug several hours to do, if it were

able to do it at all. Especially is this

true in fevers, headache, stomach

troubles, etc. Certainly no one will

doubt that to have perfect action in

any machine, each and every part of

it must be exactly in place, and en-

tirely free from obstructions. And

that the condition of the human body

which we call disease, is entirely due

to obstruction of or pressure on some

of the arteries, veins, nerves or ducts

of the body from the correct action of

which we attain motion, sensation, di-

gestion, assimilation, nutrition and

egestion. The removal of this obstruc-

tion or pressure would restore the cir-

culation of the fluids and gases of the

body, and bring about a condition of

ease, or what we know as good health.

The only way in which this can be ac-

complished is by taking the Osteopath-

ic treatment.

We have some splendid testimonials

on file at our office.

Consultation free.

Call and see us and we will do you

good. DR. J.F. JONES

18 S. Sandusky St, Delaware, O.


[image: ST. JOHN'S ENGLISH LUTHERAN CHURCH.]

St. John's English Lutheran Church

is one of the youngest churches of this

city. It was organized Nov. 22, 1885,

by the present pastor, Rev. J.F. Shaf-

fer, D.D., assisted by S.A. Ort, D.D.,

President of Wittenberg College. The

following May, 31st, 1886, the cor-

ner stone was laid with impressive

ceremony. Dr. Ort preaching the ser-

mon for the occasion. The following

October 17th, the church, a fine brick

structure, with a seating capacity of

between four and five hundred, was

dedicated, less than eleven months

from the time of its organization. The

Church is beautiful for situation. It

is in the center of the city, on Sandus-

ky street, the main street, opposite

the Court House. It is sixty-five feet

long and forty-five wide, has a sloped

floor and circular seats, is handsomely

frescoed, has well proportioned win-

dows, with beautiful stained glass, in

short, it has all modern appliances and

architectural beauty.

This organization is fourteen years

old. It has a membership enrolled

reaching over two hundred; a Sunday

School, including the home class, of

about the same number. There is

deep-seated sympathy and love be-

tween pastor and people, and they are

ever ready to extend a cordial welcome

to all new comers, or strangers wor-

shipping with them. This Church be-

longs tot the General Synod, affiliates

with other Christian denominations in

worship and in true Christian fellow-

ship. The teachings of its pulpit is

thoroughly Scriptural, free from all

that is sensational. Its aim is to make

thorough, intelligent Christians.

PERSONAL

MENTION ...

[image] WE deem it a valuable necessity to be a little per-

sonal in our business transactions, both to

patrons and wholesale dealers, as it is one of

the surest pathways to success. It is always a

good policy to look to your customers' per-

sonal interest, especially when it comes to the

important part as the staff of life. Unwhole-

some eatables are only fit for the garbage pile.

When you leave your Grocery order at either

of our stores it receives the most personal attention, it matters not

whether you are old or new patron, or whether you purchase a cent's

worth or a dollar's worth. We are always a few cents cheaper than

anybody else for the reason we buy for tow large stores and in such

immense quantities for cash, our discount is great. All we ask is a

trial order to start with -- it's all told then. When you once learn our

method of doing business you are satisfied.

Materials and products. The tempting things for a sluggish

appetite at all seasons of the year at tempting prices for a

sluggish pocketbook.

Try a Bottle of Mac Learn's Imperial Cream Cheese


Quality is a Relish. People often lack an appetite because

they have eaten something unwholesome. We do not

deal in unwholesome eatables. Our experience in buying

groceries has taught is better. We are agents for the

famous Franklin Mills Whole Wheat Flour.


Our customers expect extra good values from us in the

way of good things to eat and we see to it that they are

not disappointed in the least. Canned goods of this

year's fruits are not in. Learn our low prices.


We do business with four telephones -- both Central

Union and Citizen's. Look at your cards for our num-

bers. You can't count many minutes from the time we

receive your order till you have your goods. Try it.


We always have fresh Fruits, Vegetables, Oysters,

Poultry, good Country Butter, Eggs, home rendered

Lard, etc. See our line of Fine Candies.


W.F. DODGE,

North Sandusky St., (formerly J.G. Rosenthal.)

East Winter St.


ALWAYS READ THE

DELAWARE GAZETTE DAILY AND SEMI-WEEKLY
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.12)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.12)

Description

[page 12]

[corresponds to page 16 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION. 16

[image]

STERLING SILVER

AND .....

PLATED WARE

In addition to our regular Rogers Ware,

we have added the artistic line made by

Rodgers & Hamilton.

STERLING SILVER

NOVELTIES.

We are displaying a large variety, at

very low prices.

JEWELRY

SOLID AND PLATED.

We make a specialty of good Jewelry,

Rings, Bracelets, Brooches, Cuff Buttons,

Novelties, Etc.


[image]

CHINA BRIC-A-BRCA AND CUT GLASS.

We devote one room for this line, a most excellent assortment to purchase pres-

ents from. The following list will remind you of our departments.

Cut Glass, Glassware Cutlery, Gloves, Pocket Books,

Sterling Silver, Mirrors, Crockery, Notions, Perfumes,

Silver-plated Ware, Floor and Table Gents' Furnishing

Clocks, Brac-a-Brac, Oil Cloth, Goods, Stationery,

Jewelry, White and Bicycle Sundries, Athletics Goods,

Fancy China, Dinner Bicycles, Wood and

and Bed-room Sets, Underwear, Hosiery, Willow Ware,

Lamp Goods, Lamps, Stamped Linens, Tinware, Dolls, Books

Gold-plated Knitting Silks, Holiday and

Ornaments, Ribbons, Corsets, Wedding Presents.

NEW YORK CASH STORE,

48 & 50 North Sandusky Street,

Elmer J. Paddock, Prop. Delaware, Ohio.


BLACK CAT

HOSIERY

[image: LEATHER STOCKINGS WEAR 50% LONGER THAN ORDINARY STOCKINGS.]

Hosiery as well as Underwear, is

one of our leading departments. Our

aim is to offer such values at moderate

prices that will induce customers to make

additional purchases.

READ OUR

HOLIDAY

ADVERTISEMENT


WATER SUPPLY.

DELAWARE WATER COMPANY,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

Plant One of the Best in the State. Com-

plete in all Its Details.

The plant of the Delaware Water

Company was constructed by Moffett,

Hodgkins & Clark, and completed in

October, 1889, and consisted of 16

miles of mains, from 4 inch to 16 inch,

with 206 Ludlow fire hydrants. The

pumping station is located three miles

north of the city, on a gravel flat near

the Olentangy River. The supply of

water is obtained from a well sunk

through the gravel beds and into the

rock, being 20 feet in diameter and

25 feet deep. With this is connected a

filter gallery 300 feet in length and of

the same depth, which gathers the

water from the gravel beds. Also a 14

inch intake pipe connects the filter

gallery with the river, which can be

used in cases of emergency.

The rapid increase of consumers,

and low water in 1895, admonished the

management that it was prudent to

seek for an additional supply of water.


[image: COL. C.W. WILES.]


A Six inch test well was sunk near

the large well through the 20 feet of

gravel, and case, then carried down

through rocks of various kinds to a

depth of 255 feet, which resulted in a

natural flow of about 65,000 gallons in

24 hours. This has been piped into

the large well.

This not being sufficient for the de-

mand, an Ingersol-Seargent Air Com-

pressor, Straight Line Class "A," with

steam cylinder 12 inches in diameter,

by 14 inch stroke, air cylinder 12¼

inches in diameter by 14 inch stroke,

116 to 155 revolutions per minute at 50

to 80 pounds pressure, was installed in

the spring of 1896; a receiver, 36 inch

diameter, 6 feet high, connecting, from

which a three inch pipe conducts the

air to the well, 100 feet distant; from

the top of the well a 1½ inch pipe

takes the air 144 feet down into the

well, ending in an inverted funnel to

deflect the air upwards.

With 40 pounds of air pressure at

the receiver, the flow of the well is

increased to 500 gallons per minute;

this flow has been maintained at dif-

ferent times for 14 hours continuously,

without any apparent diminution of

the flow, the well requiring from 60 to

70 minutes to recover its natural flow

after the air is removed.

The flow of water from this well is

conducted directly to the large circu-

lar well, from which it is taken by the

pumps. The water is of most excel-

lent quality and cold during the sum-

mer, and all fear of shortage of water

during the dry season is removed.

An analysis of this deep well water

was made by the State Board of

Health, and pronounced of excellent

quality.

The pumping plant, consisting of

two compound, Duplex Dean pumping

engines of 2,000,000 capacity each in

engines of 2,000,000 gallons capacity

each in 24 hours, which may be run in-

dependent or together, with 14 inch

high and 20 inch low pressure cylin-

ders, and 14 inch water plungers of 20

inch stroke.

Two tubular boilers of 75 H.P., set

in brick, with iron front, and an 80

foot brick chimney, boiler pump, in-

jector, hot water heater and all ap-

pliances of a first-class plant; all

enclosed in a substantial brick, metal

roof station. Adjoining is a two-story

brick residence for the engineer, heat-

ed with steam.

The station is connected with the lo-

cal telephone of the city, and also has

automatic alarm bells.

The standpipe is located about 300

yards southwest of the station, near

the main pike to the city, and on

ground 53 feet at its base above the

pumps, and 45 feet above the street at

the Court House, near the center of

the city. It is 20 feet in diameter and

100 feet high, giving an average pres-

sure, when full, of 65 to 75 pounds,

owing to the grade in the city, and by

closing the valve at the standpipe a

fire pressure of 150 pounds.

Since the completion of the works,

about four miles of additional mains

have been laid, giving about 20 miles,

and 19 additional fire hydrants, giving

a total of 225.

The company have near 900 servic-

es, including among the larger ones,

three railroads, Electric Light and

Power Co., the extensive buildings of

the Ohio Wesleyan University, and

about four miles of street sprinkling

by wagons.

The larger consumers are all sup-

plied through meters, from ½ inch to

2 inch, of various makes, 355 meters

in all being in service through the

city, nearly all of which are the prop-

erty of the Water Company.

The highest average daily pumping

per month during the year 1899 was in

June, being 441,000 gallons, though in

a single day as high as 550,000 gallons

has been pumped. Total water pump-

ed for year ending Nov. 1st, 1899, was

129,876,566 gallons. Average per day

during the past year, 356,347 gallons.

Hon. F.M. Marriott is the attorney

and legal representative of the Compa-

ny.

Superintendent, Col. C.W. Wiles,

came to the city from Cortland, N.Y.,

in April, 1892, to take charge of the

works; since that time the number of

consumers has increased from 370 to

the present number, with a corre-

sponding increase in revenue. He is

also Secretary and Treasurer of the

company. He has recently been elect-

ed President of the "Central States


[image]

A NICE CHRISTMAS GIFT...

DAVIS' ART GALLERY.

L.M. DAVIS

FINE PLATINO CABINETS A SPECIALTY

18½ S. MAIN ST. DELAWARE, O.

Come in and get a dozen of those fine Cabinets only $1.25. We make

this offer until Jan. 30th, 1900.

DAVIS' ART GALLERY.


[image: UNIVERSITY HALL

ELLIOTT HALL- GYMNASIUM

THE PALACE OF ART

A BIT OF OLD DELAWARE

TERRY COLUMBUS, O.

CHOICE BITS OF DELAWARE]


Water Works Association," as asso-

ciation of water works men, compris-

ing the states of Ohio, Indiana, Michi-

gan, Tennessee, Kentucky and West

Virginia, who have a large member-

ship, and is in a flourishing condi-

tion.

The management of the company

has always been satisfactory to the

citizens of Delaware, as the rapid in-

crease of consumers will show, and all

take pride in the fact that they have

one of the best built water plants,

complete in all its details, in the

state.


WELL INVESTED.

Delaware county has paid out many

thousand dollars for making free turn-

pikes and macadamized roads. The

roads have proved a great blessing to

the farmers of the county, and of un-

told benefit to the merchants and

business men of the city.


J. F.

Gardner,

Dealer

In...

HARD

AND .....

SOFT

Coal,

Pocahontas

Smokeless.

American Cement

Plaster, Lime,

Sand and Cement.

Hard and

Soft Brick.

Contractor for

Buckeye Paving.

'Phone 89,

Office: No. 50 N. Henry St.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.13)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.13)

Description

[page 13]

[corresponds to page 17 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION. 17

FOOTWEAR

A little scrap of history repeated of times interests. Read the

following and it will pay you to ever remember it.

The old, old adage, "time will tell" is appropriately repeated in our

story. It has told over and over again, away back in 1857 when Del-

aware was a very miniature city, we hung out our latch string to the

public of Delaware and vicinity in the same room we now occupy and

on the day of our opening we framed a motto, made it iron clad

and all these years of our business career we have lived up to that one

motto and today we repeat as we did over 40 years ago. Here it is:

"Always good goods, courteous treatment, low prices and in every

respect perfect satisfaction." When that motto fails to have friends

we are ready to quit business, We have won lo these many years by

holding fast to our "life boat" and as long as we remain in business

we'll have the same old motto. We make it a special aim at all

times to have in stock everything the market produces, if its good and

by scanning the following you may form an idea of what we have, al-

though we can't mention but few of our many brands of Footwear.

QUEEN QUALITY,

the Famous Ladies'

Shoes, made in all sizes, all

shapes, all styles and only one

price, $3.00.

SLIPPERS,

for men, so nice to

put on around the house at

night to rest your feet and at

the same time they are clean

and don't track up the carpets.

SCHOOL SHOES

for Boys' and Girls'

We are sole agents for the

Famous "Messenger" Shoes,

known the world over to be the

best Child's Shoe in the world,

warm and comfortable and its

almost impossible for them to

rip.

RUBBERS,

for Men, Women and

Children. We carry the best

and always keep complete

stocks of all sizes and styles.

We pride ourselves on our line

of rubbers.

FELT BOOTS,

We can't be beat in

the United States on these

goods. We've got a stock that

will felt every man or boy in

Delaware county and we like

to show them to the people and

have them felt.

HUNTING BOOTS,

made of genuine calf

skin, brown color and a 20 inch

top loose on the instep and at

the knee joint. Price $4.00. You

would be asked $6.00 in large

cities.

SLIPPERS

for Women and Child-

ren in all sizes and at unrea-

sonably low prices. They are

very comfortable and give

great rest to your feet.

MEN'S SHOES

We carry all the lead-

ing makes; each and every pair

we can fully recommend. All

colors, all shapes, latest styles

and at reasonable prices. See

our window display.

RUBBER BOOTS,

both heavy and light

weight. Big stock with little

price, all sizes, ask to see our

line. We don't get mad if you

don't buy every time you come

in our store.

REPAIR WORK,

We at all times have

an expert repairer in our store

All work first-class. Half soles

put on either nailed or sewed.

Long live the Board of Trade of Delaware and every may she

boom our beautiful city. Come to Delaware. Come to Bauereis

Bauereis Footwear.


A Good Investment.

Deposit Your Money with

J.P. Wintermute

& Company.

And Receive in Return

HARDWARE!

"At One Hundred Cents on the Dollar,"


IDEMNITY Is what you want in

case of fire. We repre-

sent only reliable

FIRE INSURANCE

Companies. Plate Glass and Accident

Policies sold.

W.S. POLLOCK,

46 WILLIAMS BLOCK, DELAWARE, OHIO.


H.E. BUCK B. & D. W. J. DAVIS

Ex-Mayor. Ex-Sheriff.

Real Estate, Loan & Insurance Agents

Should you want anything in this line WE can save YOU

MONEY by calling on US>

Money to Loan at 5 Per Cent.

in sums of $300 and upward on good city and country im-

proved real estate. Call before going elsewhere.

BUCK & DAVIS, No. 15 West Winter St. Delaware, Ohio.


EARLY DAY SCHOOLS.

At the very earliest period of our

existence as a hamlet -- a village -- at-

tention was paid to education. Sever-

al of the first settlers, more particular-

ly those from the New England States,

Connecticut leading -- were well educa-

ted. Several who came here soon af-

ter the war of 1812-14, held a degree

from Yale. "Tis true that the curricu-

lum of that institution then bore no

comparison with that of to-day, still

it was, for that early period, quite

above the order of common schools.

Yale had been plodding along in the

even tenor of her ways for a number

of years, and had turned out several

learned and leading men, and a few of

not the least of those, found their way,

either under the lead of Colonel Kil-

bourne, who founded Worthington,

afterward up to Delaware, or under

Moses Byxbe, who founded Berkshire

and Delaware. William and Mary

College, in Virginia, also had a few

representatives in this section.

The first regular school building was

a log house near the Delaware Run, in

the rear of the present Thompson

house, south side of what is now East

William street, between Union and

Henry streets. Elam Vinings, Sr., with

his oxen hauled the logs to the site.

They were procured not far away.

This brought the first tavern, the first

court (under the trees near where the

sulphur spring is at this writing,) and

the original school house not many

rods apart. On the day of the raising

Moses Byxbe, Sr., sat at a window in

the upper story of his house, (where

Joseph Bargdill now lives,) and as no

building intervened, he had a full view

of the work, without having to turn a

hand to help. The first pedagogue to

initiate this rude structure was a man

by the name of Morgan. This was

about 1816. About two years later on,

a master was employed whom some of

the boys said was a master only of

switching. He was pronounced cross,

crabbed and cranky. The most of the

teachers were not permanent residents.

Wages were low, and perhaps this may

have had much to do with their being

more ornamental than useful. This

state or [torn page]

soon our people took hold, and in short

metre, Delaware had a full quota of

school rooms and school teachers, all

local, fully equipped mentally and ed-

ucationally to conduct the children

properly up the hill of science.

In a brief review of the different

phases through which teachers and pu-

pils passed even for the first three or

four decades after the founding of

Delaware, it would be clearly impossi-

ble to personally name all of the

teachers, and locate exactly the site

where they did their work from 1816

to 1840, therefore I shall not attempt

to do so.

Albert Pickett, Sr., a highly educa-

ted gentleman, did good work in this

village for some years. He was a fine

appearing gentleman, and although as

a disciplinarian, almost equal to a

graduate of West Point after reaching

a good rank in the army, was greatly

liked by all those he had under his in-

struction. Later on, a son, Albert, Jr.,

tried his hand at teaching, but not for

any great length of time.

An aunt of our present leading

townsman, Sidney Moore, was a teach-

er in the long ago. She was a tall, dig-

nified, intelligent lady, somewhat strict

in the rules governing her school, but

notwithstanding all this, she held the

respect and love of those under her

care.

The first teacher in a stone building

on the southwest corner of Winter and

Franklin streets, was a man named

Granger. I have heard old citizens

say, who were pupils under his in-

struction, that he did fairly well as a

hearer of recitations, but when it came

to punishing a rule violator, oh, do

take care the bee! He seemed to have

cast aside all manner of humanity. he

would seize the scholar by the ears

and yank him over the desk at a lively

rate. All were glad when his time ex-

pired and he retired from business.

A short time after this, a Mrs. Eliza

Thompson occupied this building. She

was a disciplinarian not a great im-

provement upon her predecessor,

Granger. The room was somewhat

lengthy, with a fireplace at one end.

When the weather had run the mer-

cury away below zero, it is on record

in the memory of some yet living in

this city, that they had to stand back

"like a bound boy at a husking bee,"

as she would not let them go forward

to the fire, while those near the fire-

place were suffering from the heat.

Another old timer was gentleman

named Murray. He was not large of

stature, but his mind filled whatever

was wanting in this line. He was

what would not be termed a good

dresser. He had a very small foot,

and wore nice boots, so displayed that

no one could help noticing them. His

place on instruction was a small affair

on the northeast corner of the Court

House lot.

Mrs. Murray, a most accomplished

lady, commenced the business of

teaching the young ideas how to shoot,

in the Shoub House, southeast corner

of Sandusky and William streets, near-

ly opposite to where one of her most

distinguished scholars later on, Ruth-

erford Burchard Hayes, was born. Lit-

tle die she think, then, that before the

century had ended, a magnificent City

Hall and Opera House would adorn

that corner.

Maria Jinks, whose parents resided

in a house at the southwest corner of

what is not Union and William

streets, taught in a small house close

to the Byxbe house, on the north side

of East William street. Later on Mrs.

Mary Meeker-Bennett-Sprague taught

a very interesting infant school in the

same building. At the same time --

winter of 1833 - '34 a more advanced

school was taught up stairs in the

main building.

Mrs. Murray lived at one time near

where the post office is, and taught

school in her parlor. In the early 30's

an infant school was taught in a frame

building where the A.A. Welch's sons

have their furniture store to-day.

In 1834 there was a school taught in

the Thespian Hall building, which

then adorned nearly the entire space

between what is not Central avenue

and the alley east and north of the

Court house. I cannot recall the name

of the leading teacher, but am inclined

to think it must have been Mrs. Joan

Murray, from the fact that her sister,

Miss Mary Hills, then just in her teens,

(13 years) assisted. The School Ex-

aminers then were Sherman Finch,

David T. Fuller and Ralph Hills. This

child of 13 years teaching school broke

the record then, and I doubt if it has

been equaled since. She taught five

and a half days for a week at $1.00

per week without board.

Ralph Hills, afterward Dr. Hills, al

so taught not long after his father

came into this place, which was in

1831. Chauncy Hills, who is still

among us, was also one of our old-time

teachers for a short period. The Har-

vey Hills family could well have been

styled a family of teachers in ye olden

time.

A.R. Gould taught in a building on

the East Side of North Union street,

just north of William street. Miss

Mary Moses, afterwards Mrs. Gould, I

think, taught in the same building, but

I am not positive about this.

I forgot to state that those leading

citizens of to-day, Sidney Moore, R.J.

Cox, and H.J. McCullough received

some of their instruction at the hands

of little Miss Mary Hills in the Thes-

pian Hall building.

John A. Quitman, who came to this

village in the year 1819, as a clerk

in the Land Office. Also did some teach-

ing between that date and 1821. Later

on he became very prominent as a

Mississippi Fire Eater.

Lucy Byxbe, a granddaughter of

Moses Byxbe, Sr., the founder of Dela-

ware, also tried her hand at teaching,

with more or less success.

Bayles Campbell, who lived in what

is now a part of Delaware, taught hard

by in the 30's. He was quite compe-

tent.

Daniel Sherman for some years

taught in the frame house on West

William street, where John Wharton

lives, and was regarded as a good in-

structor.

In the middle of the 30's an Acad-

emy building was erected on "Tam-

many street," near the present site of

St. Paul's M.E. church. This was a

very valuable educational accessory

to Delaware, and several good teachers

held the fort here at different times

for a number of years. Early in the

40's a very able teacher employed

there, a New Jerseyan by the name of

Flavel A. Dickerson, was absorbed by

the O.W.U., and although other good

teachers succeeded him, the school did

not flourish like a green bay tree, as

it had done in "ye olden thyme."

A year or so before Prof. Dickerson

was thus absorbed, a highly educated

gentleman named Cobb, assisted by

his wife, conducted a very good school

in the "Mansion House," now Elliott

Hall on Delaware's University Heights,

which was the root of the present Ohio

Wesleyan University.

Between fifty and sixty years ago,

a reverend gentleman named Pope, (or

rather his wife,) taught a school for

girls on then Third street, south side,

between Sandusky and Franklin Sts.

D.W.C.L.

Among the teachers who held forth

in the fifties and sixties in the old

Central school huose, which was orig-

inally used as a Methodist Church, and

located on the northwest corner of

Franklin and William streets,

were Messrs. Marsh and Chan-

dler, and Miss Charlotte Wash-

burn, who are yet remembered

by many of our citizens of ma-

ture years as "strict disciplinarians."

Whether the youth of those days need-

ed more "discipline" than those of the

present day, is not certain, but it is

certain that they got plenty of it

along with the knowledge that was

imparted to them by the knights of

the rod of those days.


[image]

"THE EVER RELIABLE

LIVERY, FEED and SALE STABLE

OF

James Ousey's

Is still located on the corner of Winter and Union Streets. Finest

accommodations in Central Ohio. Trustworthy and genteel drivers

furnished patrons. Rigs first-class. Coaches furnished for Weddings

and Funerals. Boarders given special attention. We'll send the rig.

JAMES OUSEY.

"Phone No 73. 32, 34 & 36 N. Union, Cor. Winter St.


[image]

GEO. B. ALEXANDER, DEALER IN .....

WALL PAPER, GLASS, OILS, PAINTS, VARNISH, ETC.

Carrying in stock all grades of Pictures and Room Mouldings, Artistic Pictures

and Frames.

NO. 15 EAST WINTER STREET,

TELEPHONE NO. 76. DELAWARE, OHIO.


Wm. McKenzie. C.B. Thompson.

MCKENZIE & THOMPSON,

Manufacturers and Dealers in

Hickory LUMBER Walnut,

and Oak Ash,

Timber a Poplar

Specialty. and Elm.

AND SUCKER RODS.

Also a full line of Building Material, Pine and Poplar Siding, Lath

and Shingles, Wood, Etc.

Factory and Office E. Wm. Street. DELAWARE, OHIO.


ALWAYS READ THE

DELAWARE

DAILY AND

SEMI~WEEKLY GAZETTE


[image: HEFFNER'S LIVERY, FEED & BOARDING STABLE. LIVERY]


The Best Turnouts in the city at all times. Careful drivers when

desired. Easiest riding carriages, buggies and traps in Delaware, and

when you see anyone taking a pleasure ride it's safe to say the rig

came from Heffner's stable. Prices are such as all can afford to ride.

Special Terms to Students. New stock

Rubber Tire Buggies and Carriages.

New and Old 'Phones 83. No. 30 E. Winter St.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.14)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.14)

Description

[page 14]

[corresponds to page 18 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


18 DELAWARE GAZETTE -- BOARD OF TRADE EDITION.

GIRL'S INDUSTRIAL HOME.

[image: CAPT. A.W. STILES.]

Probably the most meritorious of all

the state of Ohio's noble system of Be-

nevolent and Reformatory institutions

is the Girls' Industrial Home, which is

situated ten miles southwest of the

city of Delaware.

In 1869 the necessity was recognized

for the establishment of a suitable in-

stitution by the state for the care of

its unfortunate young girls who cir-

cumstances or heredity may have in-

clined to go wrong, and the well known

While Sulphur or Hart Springs prop-

erty was purchased, and in the frail

buildings then on the grounds, the

Girls' Industrial Home was installed.

Among the members of its first Board

of Trustees, appointed by Governor

Hayes, was the late Abram Thomson,

editor of the Delaware Gazette, and

the late Frederick Merrick, President

of the University, and to the judgment

and foresight of these men and their

colleagues, is due the successful issue

of what was then considered more or

less of an experiment.

The Home is efficiently and capably

managed by Captain Albert W. Stiles

Superintendent, and Mrs. Albert W.

Stiles, Matron, assisted by an excel-

lent corps of teachers, assistant

matrons and housekeepers. In their

last report to the Governor, the Trus-

tees say: "The work of the Superin-

tendent and matron, Captain and Mrs.

A.W. Stiles, cannot be too highly

commended."


[image: HARRY H. PIERCE,]

Mr. Harry H. Pierce, the present

Agent of the Hocking Valley R.R.,

has filled that position with this popu-

lar road since June, 1893. He has the

esteem and respect of the business

men and citizens of Delaware, and

through his untiring efforts, his road

has received a good share of patron-

age from Delaware folks. Mr. Pierce

is a prominent member of the Knights

of Pythias, and is a jolly good fellow

in every respect.


Bright Light.

It is just as easy and a great deal

better to have a real good light

than one that is almost no light at

all. Well, here's the way, get you

Coal Oil & Gasoline

of me and I will guarantee that

my brands of Oil will not smoke

your chimney and clog up the

burners. There'll be no darkness

if I have charge of your cans.

Be Sure you get my Wagon.

Clive K. Dall.


The E.E. Naylor Company,

Antbracite and Bituminous Coal.

Citizens 'Phones 34, 206, 365. J.M. CLARK, Manager. 17 West William Street.


[image]

Grove Bros.,

Manufacturers and Dealers in

Harness, Trunks,

~ Valises, Etc.

No 6 North Sandusky Street.


MAJOR C. H. McELROY.

Major McElroy was born at Gam-

bier, O., in 1830. His parents, Rev.

James McEleroy, D.D., of the P.E.

Church, and Maria Burrowes McElroy,

were natives of Ireland. Soon after

his father's graduation from Trinity

College, Dublin, his parents were mar-

ried, and came directly to Gam-

bier, where his father taught

special classes in high mathematics,

and finished his theological course.

In 1832 his father came to Delaware,

O., as Rector of St. Peter's P.E.

Church; in 1840 he removed to Stan-

ton, Va., and remained in Virginia un-

til the spring of 1852, when he return-

ed to Delaware on a call from St. Pe-

ter's Church. C.H. McElroy received

his education at the academies and

classical schools of Virginia; at-

tended the Law School at the

University of Virginia; in the

fall of 1852, he was examined by the

Judges of the Court of Appeals, and

admitted to the bar of Virginia. Un-

der the laws of Ohio, as then in force,

he could not be admitted for a year;

engaged in civil engineering until

1855, when he returned to Delaware;

was admitted here, and has been en-

gaged in the practice of his profes-

sion ever since, except when in the

war of the rebellion and on the Bench.

In 1857-8 and in 1878 Judge McElroy

was elected Mayor by the citizens

without reference to party and with-

out any solicitation or action on his

part.

October 25th, 1855, Judge McElroy

was married to Caroline Murray, a na-

tive of Delaware, and daughter of

Richard and Joan Hills Murray. Her

father had been a member of the Bar

of Delaware, at once taking a high

stand as an attorney of ability, learn-

ing in his profession, and of strict in-

tegrity, but death seized upon him at

an early day, and during the infancy

of his daughter Caroline. Her mother

lived to the age of seventy-five years,

possessing in the highest degree the

esteem and affection of her two thous-

and pupils, (of whom Judge McElroy

was one,) and of all who knew her.

Her exalted character was richly in-

herited by her daughter Caroline. De-

cember 6, 1883, the wife and mother

passed away, her husband and four

children surviving -- three children had

preceded their mother. Judge McEl-

roy's father, mother and four sisters

went to California soon after the war;

but two sisters are now living. In

august, 1861, Judge McElroy enlisted

and was mustered in as a private in

the 20th O.V.I., Soon after that he

was chosen captain of Co. D, and was

in command of the Company at Ft.

Donelson and Pittsburg Landing; in

August, 1862, he was transferred and

appointed Major of the 96th O.V.I.,

and was with that regiment at Chick-

asaw Bayou, Arkansas Post and Vicks-

burg. In 1863 he was honorably dis-

charged on account of disability from

disease. After partial recovery, he

resumed practice.

In 1881, at the urgent solicitation of

members of the Bar, influential citi-

zens and friends, without reference to

party, he accepted the nomination for

Common Pleas Judge. In politics he

has always been a Republican, and the

judicial sub-division was quite large-

ly Democratic. He was elected, and

re-elected, serving ten years as Com-

mon Pleas Judge. Since his retire-

ment from the Bench he has been in

the active practice of his profession.


Suits and Overcoats made right

MARTIN HENRY & SON.


[image: DR. F.M. MURRAY.]


The subject of this sketch could not

help being born in Ohio. His parents

lived here at the time. He served an

apprenticeship of four years in the

drug store of Dr. S.S. Yoder, late M.

C., 4th District of Ohio. Then went to

Key West, Florida, as apothecary to

the U.S. Marine Hospital. During his

four years of service here, he prosecu-

ted his studies. Graduated from the

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in

1876; the Jefferson Medical College in

1877, and took the degree of Ph. D. at

the University of Pennsylvania in

1878. Was married in Philadelphia to

Miss A.M. Kirby in January, 1880.

Came to Delaware 7½ years ago, and

bought the Mr. V.D. Stayman house

on West Winter street, where he has

been comfortably housed ever since.

He is neither the greatest nor best

man alive, but he enjoys a good prac-

tice; loves his fellow man, and de-

lights at all time to relieve suffering

humanity. He is a member of the

Presbyterian Church, Hiram Lodge

No. 18, F. & A. M., Delaware Lodge

No. 76, B. P. O. E., the I. O. Foresters,

&c.


ADVERTISE IN THE GAZETTE


[image] E. R. THOMPSON,

Livery, Feed

& Sale Stable

High Grade Horses

Bought and Sold.

FIRST=CLASS LIVERY RIGS.

Thompson's Livery

for The Best in the City.

'Phones 93 and 93.


[image]

WE GUARANTEE

Colored Goods not to Fade,

Woolens not Shrink,

Finest Work in the City on

Linens.

G. H. Aigin & co.

Phone 2. 100 East Wm. St


KING'S

Cigar and News Depot

[image]

It's Headquarters

for all the leading periodicals

and Daily Newspapers. City

agency for the Cincinnati En-

quirer.

Suggestive Presents:

See our fine line of Fancy

Boxes Cigars, Pipes, Cigar Cases

etc. See Window.

KING'S

CIGAR AND NEWS DEPOT


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Hardware.

SPORTING GOODS

AND ELECTRICAL

SUPPLIES.

LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE

STOCKIN DELAWARE COUNTY.

Agents for .....

AMERICAN FENCE,

IMPERIAL PLOWS,

LOWE BROS. PAINT.

LEAS

HARDWARE CO.


DIAMONDS,

STERLING SILVER,

WATCHES, CLOCKS,

OPTICAL GOODS,

RELIABLE GOODS

AT .....

RELIABLE PRICES

...by...

[image]

B. YEHLEY.

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN.


Modern Porches.

Lumber, Nails,

Glass, Coal,

Paints, Cement

Salt. and Plaster.

All kinds of Mill Work.

Geo. Clark & Son,

'Phone No. 12. South Main Street.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.15)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.15)

Description

[page 15]

[corresponds to unnumbered page 19 of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]


Ohio Wesleyan School of Business

A Live Business Training School

of Practical and Modern Methods.

Established in 1884. Reorganized in 1895.

BOOKKEEPING, PENMANSHIP, SHORTHAND,

TYPEWRITING, TELEGRAPH, COMMERCIAL LAW,

ENGLISH COURSES, COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC.

LOWEST RATES OF TUITION.

Write to us for a BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED CATA-

LOGUE OF THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, which will give

FULL INFORMATION. Also please write us for any further

particulars not mentioned in the catalogue. THE SCHOOL IS

OPEN DURING THE ENTIRE YEAR, and we are always ready

to cheerfully give any information.


[image: O.W.U. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, DELAWARE, O.

L.L. HUDSON, A.M., Princiapl.]

Address all Communications to

L.L. HUDSON, A.M. Principal,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

"The School of Business of the Univesity

is ably conductd, and splendidly

equipped with all modern convenien-

ces. Its faculty is above criticism. The results

accomplished speaks emphatically as to the fitness

of each individual teacher, proving that each in-

structor is a specialist in this line of work. The

courses of instruction are systematically arranged

and complete. As the results of such excellence,

in all material details, the graduates of this school

are thoroughly competent to take responsible places,

to which are attached high salaries, willingly paid

by appreciative business men." --Daily Gazette.


[image] Citizens' Telephone Company.

"To hear well is a gift of Providence." You can hear and talk both over

THE NEW TELEPHONE.

HOME CAPTIAL-HOME INDUSTRY.

Join the 400 and get a new 'phone for the coming year. Look over the list
and see how many of your friends

are using our 'phone. The value of a 'phone is the number reached by it.

LOW PRICES AND A SATISFACTORY SERVICE.

Citizens' Telephone Company.


E.E. JONES, A.E. JONES,

Delaware's popular clothiers.

1855.

The above date is the year that

E.E. Jones, the Senior partner

of this enterprising firm came

to Delaware. he is the only

merchant in Delaware who oc-

cupies the same stand the past

44 years. In order to meet the

growing trade their store has

been greatly enlarged and mod-

ernized and is now the largest

and lightest store room in the

city, being 122 feet long by 20

in width. It has a 12 ft square

sky light, which enables the

customers to see what they are

buying even in the darkest

days.

[image: E.E. JONES.]

The old firm of E.E. JOnes

& Co., consisting of E.E. Jones

W.C. Jaynes and A.E. Jones

was disolved in Feb. 1897,

Mr. Jaynes withdrawing. The

business was continued under

the name of E.E. Jones & son

whose popularity is so well

known in Delaware and adjoin-

ing counties. By strict adher

ance to square business princi

pals they have gained the well

earned title of The Leading

Clothiers and Merchant Tailers

of Delaware.

Their Mottos:

"ONE PRICE TO ALL."

"No misrepresentation allowed

in this store."

"LARGE SALES AND

SMALL PROFITS,"

This House has become the Large Department Store of Delaware.


Department No. 1

MEN'S CLOTHING

Department No. 2

BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S

CLOTHING

Department No. 3

MERCHANT TAILORING.

Department No. 4

GENTS' FURNISHING

GOODS.

Department No. 5

HATS AND CAPS.

Department No. 6

TRUNKS AND VALISES.

Department No. 7

CUSTOM MADE SUITS,

TO ORDER $10 TO $20.

By samples from the Larg-

est Merchant Tailor Hous-

es in New York, Chicago,

and Cincinnati.

SPECIALTIES.

When any New Design

in

HATS, NECKWEAR,

SHIRTS OR GARMENT

Comes into market, you can

always find them at this Up-to-

Date House.

Should you get anything not just exactly as represented, you can always get your money

back, and cheerfull and withut a sigh, at

E.E. JONES & SON'S


[image: B.W. BROWN & CO.]

That Agonizing Look

Is never on the face of wome who

wear the Sorosis Shoes.

"Sorosis"

(MEANS BEST,)

and even more; there's comfort, beauty and

exclusiveness in every pair.

Always

35 Styles Sizes 1 to 9. $3.50 Width AAA to E.

WE HANDLE THIS AND OTHER BRANDS.

B.W. Brown & co

THE CAS SHOE HOUSE.


Advertise in the Gazette and your goods will always sell.


C.E. COOK,

MACHINIST,

22 Union St, Delaware, Ohio

MAKERS OF

UPRIGHT

GAS ENGINES.

REPAIRS AND

SELLS

BICYCLES

AND SUNDRIES

All kinds of Machine

and Boiler Repair .....

work.

all kinds of Machine

and Boiler Fitting and

Trimming in Stock.

LONG DISTANCE 'PHONE

CONNESTION.

C.E. COOK,

MACHINIST,

22 Union St., Delaware, Ohio.
Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.16)

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette (p.16)

Description

[page 16]

[corresponds to back page of the Board of Trade Edition
of the Semi-Weekly Gazette. DELAWARE, OHIO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1899.]



Central Union

LICENSEE FOR

The American Bell Telephone Co.

We are prepared to furnish

COMPLETE TELEPHONE SYSTEMS

FOR

Private Lines, Hotels, Factories,

Warehouses, Etc.

"The Mail is quick, the telegraph is quicker, but the Long

Distance Telephone is instantaneous and you don't

have to wait for an answer."

You can save money by purchasing toll coupon at a discount of from

five to twenty-five per cent, according to amount. You can hold a con-

[image: NOT IN, WHY DID'NT YOU TELEPHONE AND

SAVE YOURSELF THE TRIP? OFFICE]

versation of 450 words at a distance

of 100 miles for less than the cost of

a telegram and the answer. Merchants use the Long Distance Tele-

phone for emergency orders. Goods

ordered by telephone always come

right. Merchants find the Long

Distance Telephone invaluable as a

means of instantaneous communica-

tion where secrecy is indispensable.

[image: FRANK LUKENBELL, MANAGER,

Delaware, Ohio,]

[image: LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE]

Telephone Co

GENERAL OFFICES.

ASHLAND BLOCK, CORNER RANDOLPH AND CLARK STREETS.

W.A. JACKSON, President, Chicago, Ill.

M.M. CARNEY, General Mgr., Chicago, Ill.

L.G. RICHARDSON, General Sol., Chicago, Ill.

W.S. CHAPMAN, Sec'y and Treas., Chicago, Ill.

B.F. LLOYD, Superintendent, Columbus, Ohio.

JNO. W. CHERRY, Asst. Supt., Columbus Ohio.

V.D. GREEN, Asst. Supt., Toledo, Ohio.

F. LUKENBELL, Manager, Delaware, Ohio.


With the new

and improved

apparatus

now in use the

Central Union

Telephone Co.

is prepared to

furnish full

Metalic Cir-

cuit Service,

equipped with Long Distance Instruments. Rates will

be quoted upon application to the manager, or he will

be glad to call upon those who request it.

[image: LET'S ORDER SOME MEAT.]

Look for the

"Sign of the Blue Bell."

It is a guarantee of all that is best in telephony.


First

National

Bank.

DELAWARE, OHIO.

C.B. PAUL, Pres't. J.D. VANDEMAN, Vice Pres't.

G.W. POWERS, Cashier.

Capital $100,000.

Surplus $20,000.

Does a General Banking business,

Deals in Government Bonds and other

First-Class Securities.

Account of

Individuals, Firms & Corporations Invited.


Chartered Under the Laws of Ohio.

The Delaware

Savings Bank Co.,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

H.M. PERKINS, PRESIDENT. F.P. HILLS, CASHIER.

W.H. BODURTHA, ASST. CASHIER.


DIRECTORS.

C. HILLS, JOHN POWELL,

A.J. LYON, H.M. PERKINS,

C.B. AUSTIN, F.P. HILLS,

H.J. McCULLOUGH, J.M. CRAWFORD,


100 Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire=

Proof Vault to Rent.

Agency for Ocean Steamship Lines.

Dublin Core

Title

Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette from the Collection of the Delaware County Historical Society

Description

Special Edition of the Delaware Semi-Weekly Gazette, Delaware, OH. This newspaper is in the collection of the Delaware County Historical Society.

Source

Delaware County Historical Society, Delaware, OH

Publisher

Digitized by Community Library, Sunbury OH, 2014

Date

1899

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/

Format

image/jpg

Language

English

Type

text

Identifier

92961177

Coverage

Delaware, OH. December 22, 1899. City of Delaware, Delaware County, OH

Collection

Citation

“Board of Trade Edition of the Semi-Weekly Gazette from the Collection of the Delaware County Historical Society,” Delaware County Memory, accessed May 28, 2022, http://delawarecountymemory.org/items/show/147.

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