Delaware Cook Book

Delaware Cook Book (p. 1)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 1)

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[page 1]

[corresponds to front cover of Delaware Cook Book]

Delaware

Cook Book.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 2)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 2)

Description

[page 2]

[corresponds to inside of front cover of Delaware Cook Book]

S. P. SHUR & CO.

OUR STOCK OF

CARPETS

comprises all the latest designs and colorings in

Wilton Velvets, Axminsters,

Moquettes, Borders,

Tapestries and Ingrains.

Also a complete line of

MATTINGS

in Straw, Hemp, etc.

DRAPERIES,

of all kinds and in the newest styles.

OUR RUGS

are always beautiful, and we have them in all sizes.

NEW STOCK. NEW STYLES.

SEE THEM.

Our Workmen are the Best. We Cannot be Beat.

Very truly,

S. P. SHUR & CO.,

DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 3)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 3)

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[page 3]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 3 of Delaware Cook Book]

FOR LADIES ONLY

HERE IS SOMETHING CURIOUS.

IF YOU

ARE ENGAGED

the whole of the

following lines

will interest you

but

IF YOU

ARE MARRIED

Read only alter-

nate lines, com-

mencing with

1st, 3d and so on.

You are probably

busy and may

skip the rest.

IF YOU wish to be considered a model housekeeper you must

take care when furnishing your future home that you

spend your money to the best advantage, and it is specially

necessary if your income is to be a limited one. . . It is

advisable that you should provide yourself with thoroughly

reliable kitchen utensils and cooking appliances. You should buy

good household requisites, selected from an up-to-date stock. The

newly-married hubby is interested in his wife's cooking, and

meals which are prepared by the aid of the best utensils

are likely to prove the most satsifactory to him. They certainly

are easiest to get ready, and save considerable worry. If you

agree with our views on this subject, and if you think that you

would like to inspect some of the latest cooking appliances

we can recommend a visit to our showrooms. At any time

we shall be delighted to show you our stock, and

feel confident that we have much to interest you. If you wish us

to explain the merits of our goods to you and to your friends,

please favor us with a call at your early convenience.

You should remember that our address is . . . .

F. B. KARL, DELAWARE, OHIO.

TWO DOORS NORTH OF POSTOFFICE.

N. B.--The above lines are interesting, but our novelties are more interesting

still. Don't forget our invitation to call and see them.

Staple and Fancy Groceries,

Best Brands Flour and Smoked Meats,

Choice Butter and Fresh Eggs

A SPECIALTY.

Your Patronage Solicited. Goods Promptly Delivered.

BEST GOODS,

HONEST WEIGHT,

LOWEST PRICES,

J. P. CHAPMAN & CO.,

DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 4)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 4)

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[page 4]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 4 of Delaware Cook Book]

RUFUS CARPENTER, Ex-Probate Judge. WM. C. NYE.

CARPENTER & NYE,

Real Estate, Loan, Fire, Life,

and Accident Insurance Agents,

No. 72 North Sandusky Street,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

Real Estate

Bought, Sold and Man-

aged on Commission.

Rents Collected,

Tenants Secured.

and Taxes Paid.

Loans Negotiated, Wills,

Leases,

Mortgages and Deeds,

Carefully Drawn.

J. E. WILLIAMS,

THE

MACHINIST.

AGENT

FOR

WAVERLY,

THE

WINTON

AND

BEN-HUR

BICYCLES.

[image of person riding bicycle]

Bicycle Infirmary.

When you need an expert workman

To repair your broken wheel,

Take it down to J. E. Williams

And the break to him reveal;

He's a master of mechanics,

From engines down to toys,

And "doctors up" the bicycles

When broken by the boys.

It makes no difference what you break,

From handle bar to tire,

He'll fix the break that you may ride

O'er pavements or through mire;

His charges are quite reasonable,

His work is sound and true,

And that is why we recommend

This expert man to you.

You'll find him on North Union Street,

Twenty and twenty-two.

ROSENTHAL'S

Groceries!

are Always Fresh and Good.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 5)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 5)

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[page 5]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 5 of Delaware Cook Book]

ALL Business entrusted

to me will be Carefully

and Promptly Attended

to at Moderate Rates.

REAL ESTATE Sold and

Rented; Rents Collect-

ed and Taxes Paid for

Non-Residents.

ESTABLISHED 1879.

J. M. SYCKS,

Real Estate, Loan and Insurance.

29 1/2 NORTH SANDUSKY ST., DELAWARE, OHIO.

Money Loaned. Steamship Tickets for Sale.

COAL! The Best is the Cheapest!

THE NO. 19

is the only reliable coal in the market. Buy one ton of it. You will have

no other. Sold by

NO. 4 W. WILLIAM ST.

TELEPHONE NO. 1.

J. A. SELL.

W. W. WILLIAMS,

[SUCCESSOR TO W. A. GREINER.]

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable,

67 NORTH MAIN STREET,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

TELEPHONE 133. SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS.

M. E. DEMAREST,

DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF

FINE FOOTWEAR.

PLACE OF BUSINESS:

No. 26 West Winter Street.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 6)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 6)

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[page 6]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 1 of Delaware Cook Book]

THE

DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

A CAREFUL COLLECTION

OF

TRIED AND APPROVED RECIPES

BY

THE LADIES

OF

ST. PAUL'S M. E. CHURCH,

DELAWARE OHIO.

1896.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 7)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 7)

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[page 7]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 2 of Delaware Cook Book]

THE F. T. EVANS

PRINTING AND PUBLISHING HOUSE,

DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 8)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 8)

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[page 8]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 3 of Delaware Cook Book]

Delaware Cook Book

"Who builds the fire for his wife,

Much happiness will have in life."

"The smile of the hostess is the cream of the

feast."

"Man is what he eats."

"It was only a glad 'Good Morning,'

As she passed along the way,

But it spread the morning's glory

Over the livelong day."
Delaware Cook Book (p. 9)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 9)

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[page 9]

[corresponds to page 4 of Delaware Cook Book]

4

[image of eyes with glasses]

GOOD SIGHT

is essential to a good cook.

GOOD GLASSES

correctly fitted to eyes

make and preserve sight. At the up-to-date Optical Store of

PLATT BROS.,

your eyes will be examined by an experienced specialist. No charge for

testing and Glasses as low as 25 cents.

Never buy glasses from a peddler. You pay more--you risk your eyes.

THE CHAIR FOR YOU!

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR THE

Delaware, Ohio,

Double Cane Chairs

and Rockers.

[image of rocker]

THEY ARE SOLD FROM OCEAN TO OCEAN.

If you want a Chair for the Library, Sitting Room, Lawn or Office, that

is strong, right in the seat, right in the back, right everywhere, ask your

dealer for the DELAWARE CHAIR. All not so branded as imitations.

DELAWARE CHAIR CO.,

DELAWARE, OHIO.

Catalogues to the Trade.

MRS. H. C. CLIPPINGER,

Millinery!

Corner Winter and Main Sts., over Donavin & Co's Clothing Store.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 10)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 10)

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[page 10]

[corresponds to page 5 of Delaware Cook Book]

PROLOGUE.

Ho, ye mortals, we are bringing

You a message of good cheer,

Of a COOK BOOK we would tell you

Chant its praises far and near,

If its precepts you but follow

Best of health will then be yours.

Recipes we've tried and proven

Length of days for each insures.

O, the cakes are light and puffy,

From the Sponge to Angel Food,

And the custards are so fluffy

Pies and puddings just as good.

Then there are the meats and entrees,

And so many hosts of things

You'll pronounce when you have tried them

This is food for queens and kings.

Then, "O, wonder of a COOK BOOK!"

In amaze we hear you cry

"It not only teaches cooking

But advises where to buy!"

MIRIAM DRAKE LIVINGSTONE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 11)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 11)

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[page 11]

[corresponds to page 6 of Delaware Cook Book]

6

J. E. CAMPBELL & BRO.,

Fancy Grocers,

SANDUSKY STREET.

DELAWARE, OHIO.

OUR AIM:

BEST BRANDS OF GOODS.

SMITHS'

ONE PRICE CLOTHING

HOUSE.

We have the Largest Stock.

We have the Lowest Prices.

A Fine Line of Children's Suits.

SMITHS' SIGN OF THE BEAR.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 12)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 12)

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[page 12]

[corresponds to page 7 of Delaware Cook Book]

7

TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

1 cup medium size..................................1/2 pt

1 cup butter.......................................1/2 lb

1 cup packed chopped meat..........................1/2 lb

1 cup raisins........................................6 oz

4 cups sifted flour..................................1 lb

2 cups granulated sugar..............................1 lb

1 cup English currants...............................6 oz

1 cup ordinary liquid..............................1/2 lb

1 tablespoonful heaped flour.......................1/2 oz

1 " " sugar.......................3/4 oz

2 " " ordinary liquid...............1 oz

Butter size of an egg.............................2 ounce

KITCHEN TIME TABLE.

Baking.

Beans.....................8 to 10 hrs

Bread....................40 to 60 min

Biscuit..................10 to 20 min

Cake.....................20 to 40 min

Gingerbread..............20 to 30 min

Cookies..................10 to 15 min

Graham gems....................30 min

Potatoes.................30 to 45 min

Pudding, bread, rice and tapioca 1 hr

Turkey 10 lb.....................3 hr

Boiling.

Summer Vegetables.

String beans....................2 hrs

Green peas.....................1/2 hr

Beets............................1 hr

Turnips..........................1 hr

Winter Vegetables.

Potatoes.......................1/2 hr

Beets........................3 1/2 hr

Parsnips.........................1 hr

Squash...........................1 hr
Delaware Cook Book (p. 13)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 13)

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[page 13]

[corresponds to page 8 of Delaware Cook Book]

8

J. A. BOWDLE, 46 SOUTH MAIN STREET,

Dealer in all kinds of

Flour, Feed and Grain.

I advertise in this Cook Book,

Because here the ladies will look

Where they can find the best--

That is the place they will invest.

"Oh, you have such nice bread! do tell

Where do you buy flour?" From BOWDLE.

The Magestic Steel Range!

Has Made a Revolution in Cooking.

[image of range]

We invite the ladies of Delaware and vi-

cinity to call at our store and examine this

wonderful Range. We will show you the

merits it has,--possessed by no other Range.

Also

Tinware, Stoves, Mantels, Grates,

Plumbing, Hot Water and

Steam Fittings.

Everything to be found in a first class

House Furnishing House.

22 SOUTH MAIN STREET.

PUMPHREY & ARMSTRONG.

SEDALIA COAL!

GIVE IT A TRIAL.

THE BEST IN THE CITY.

FOR SALE BY

S. M. HUNTER,

AT SINGER OFFICE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 14)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 14)

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[page 14]

[corresponds to page 9 of Delaware Cook Book]

SOUPS.

"Now good digestion wait on appetite, and health on both."

--Shakespeare.

Oyster Soup.

One quart oysters, one quart milk, one pint strained liquor

of oysters and cold water. Add this with a little salt and large

piece of butter to the milk, let it come to a boil, add oysters,

and let it boil up once.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Potato Soup.

Six boiled and mashed potatoes, one quart milk, one-fourth

pound butter; season with pepper and salt. While mashing, add

the butter and pour in the boiling milk gradually. Stir well,

and strain through a sieve, heat once more. Beat up an egg,

put in tureen, and pour over it the soup.

MISS ANNA G. SYCKS.

Bean Soup.

Rub one pint cooked beans through a colander, add one

pint of milk. Let it boil, then add a little flour thickening, with

salt, pepper and butter to suit the taste. Mashed potatoes left

over may be used in the same way.

MRS. M. P. KEEN.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 15)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 15)

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[page 15]

[corresponds to page 10 of Delaware Cook Book]

10

Corn Soup.

Twelve ears corn scraped, and the cobs boiled twenty min-

utes in one quart water. Remove the cobs, put in the corn and

boil fifteen minutes, then add two quarts of rich milk. Season

with salt, pepper and butter, and thicken with two tablespoon-

fuls flour. Boil the whole ten minutes, and turn into a tureen,

in which the yolks of three eggs have been well beaten.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Noodles.

One egg, one tablespoonful milk, salt, one-half teaspoonful

Cleveland's baking powder in the flour. Mix very stiff. Roll out

as thin as possible. Let it dry an hour. Dredge with flour to

keep from sticking, then roll up tightly. Begin at one end and

shave down fine like cabbage for slaw. Use in any meat broth.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Tomato Soup.

One part tomatoes strained through a colander; one part hot

water, two parts milk. Put in a pinch of soda before adding

milk, and as much butter as you would use in oyster soup.

Let all heat but not boil. Add a few crackers broken. Serve

hot.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Vegetable Soup.

Get a five cent soup bone. Put on to boil in about four

quarts of cold water, salt and pepper to season; boil until tender.

Then take out the meat and strain the broth, to which add one

onion, two potatoes chopped fine, one-half cup rice, one cup cab-

bage chopped fine, one cup tomatoes; boil one and one-half

hours. Serve hot.

MRS. T. W. CRABBE.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Ex-

tracts because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 16)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 16)

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[page 16]

[corresponds to page 11 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 11

FISH AND MEATS.

"There's no want of meats, sir,

Portly and curious viands are prepared,

To please all kinds of appetite."

Baked White Fish.

Pour boiling water over the fish to loosen the skin, remove

the skin and rub corn meal or cracker crumbs thickly over the

fish, season well with salt and pepper. Put in a pan with plenty

of butter cut in small pieces over it. Bake twenty minutes,

basting frequently.

MRS. J. M. ARMSTRONG.

Salmon Pudding.

One can salmon minced, all oil poured off; one cup fine bread

crumbs, three eggs well beaten. Salt and pepper to taste. Put in

a baking bowl, set in a dripping pan filled with water, put in

oven and steam one hour.

SAUCE.--Let come to a boil one cup milk, thicken with one

tablespoonful Kingford's starch, one egg well beaten and the

juice of one-half lemon.

MRS. LUCY PATTEN.

Escalloped Oysters.

To one quart star crackers rolled fine, add one quart oysters,

one-fourth pound butter slightly melted, three-fourths quart

milk and hot water, half and half. Season nicely with salt and

pepper and stir thoroughly with large spoon. Bake in a moder-

ately hot oven about forty-five minutes, or until brown. Any

kind of cooked meat chopped fine can be substituted for oysters

and makes a very palatable dish.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 17)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 17)

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[page 17]

[corresponds to page 12 of Delaware Cook Book]

12 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Drop Dumplings.

One cup flour, a pinch of salt, one teaspoonful Cleveland's

baking powder; sift all together, then take enough sweet milk

to make a stiff dough. This will make five nice sized dump-

lings. Have some beef or chicken broth boiling hot, dip a

tablespoon in the broth to prevent it sticking, cut off a piece of

the dough and drop in boiling broth. Repeat process until all

is used, wetting spoon each time. Boil ten minutes; as soon

as the lid is removed, take a fork and open the top of each

one to prevent falling. Serve with butter or gravy.

MISS CYNTHIA SMITH.

Economy Croquettes.

Rightly made, this combination of "left-overs," which are

too good to waste, is nice for breakfast or supper. Mince cold

meat finely, either pork or beef; to one-half teacup of this add

as much, or more, of cold rice and mashed potatoes. Break six

or eight crackers in a dish and wet with just enough sweet milk

to soak them; then mix all together, adding a well beaten egg,

and a pinch of salt and pepper. Flour the hands and make

into cakes the size of small cookies; fry until nicely browned

on both sides. Serve with butter.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.

Veal Croquettes.

Chop cold veal fine, season with salt, pepper, cayenne, onion

juice, celery salt and parsley, moisten with beaten egg and white

sauce (see below) and shape into rolls four inches long. Roll

in fine bread crumbs, egg, and crumbs again, and fry as dough-

nuts one minute in smoking hot fat.

WHITE CREAM SAUCE.--One pint hot cream, one-half tea-

spoonful salt, two tablespoonfuls butter, one-half teaspoonful

celery salt, one-half saltspoonful white pepper, four heaping

tablespoonfuls flour or two heaping tablespoonfuls Kingsford's

corn starch. Scald the cream, melt the butter in a granite sauce-

pan, stir till well mixed, add the cream gradually, stirring as it

thickens. The sauce should be perfectly smooth and very thick,

almost like a drop batter. Add seasoning and mix while hot

with the meat.

MRS. D. A. LINCOLN.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 18)

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Delaware Cook Book (p. 18)

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[page 18]

[corresponds to page 13 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 13

Little Meat Pies.

Line gem pans with biscuit dough made with Cleveland's

baking powder. Make gravy with meat stock if you have it; if

not, use one teacupful half milk and water, one tablespoonful

butter, a little flour, pepper and salt, one teacup meat chopped

fine. Cook all together. Fill pans with the mixture, and cook

fifteen minutes.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Pressed Beef.

Use half thick flank, and half second cut off the neck.

Boil until very tender, pick out all bones and gristle, and set

aside to cool. When cold chop fine, season to taste with salt,

pepper and ground celery seed. To each ten pounds of meat,

add one pint of very dry bread or cracker crumbs rolled fine.

The broth having become cold, remove all the grase. Heat the

broth, strain to remove bones, and add sufficient to the meat to

make it moist enough to pack smoothly. It should be prepared

the day before wanted for use. Set on ice. Slice very thin.

MRS. J. R. MOONEY.

Corned Beef Pickle.

One gallon water, one and one-half pounds salt, one-half

pound brown sugar, one-fourth ounce salt petre. Be sure to

keep meat under the brine.

MRS. J. A. CLINGAN.

Dainty Veal Steak.

Cut veal steak in pieces large enough for each person.

Have ready one egg well beaten and highly seasoned with pep-

per and salt; also five or six crackers rolled, (not too fine). Dip

veal in egg, first on one side, then on the other; repeat same

process with cracker crumbs; then fry in butter and lard,

which should be boiling hot when veal is put in. Cover closely

at first. Let cook one-half hour, removing cover the last ten

minutes. This is delicate as chicken.

MRS. GEO. D. LOWRY.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 19)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 19)

Description

[page 19]

[corresponds to page 14 of Delaware Cook Book]

14 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Veal Omelet.

Three pounds meat (one-half beef round steak and one-half

veal steak), three tablespoonfuls melted butter, three tablespoon-

fuls sweet milk, one tablespoonful salt, one tablespoonful black

pepper, one-half teaspoonful sage, three eggs, nine rolled crack-

ers. Mix thoroughly, and form into loaf in a bread pan, leaving

a little space around it for basting. Bake one and one-half

hours, basting often with hot water and butter.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Veal Loaf.

Three and one-half pounds of minced veal, three eggs well

beaten, one tablespoonful pepper, one tablespoonful salt, one

grated nutmeg, four rolled crackers, one tablespoonful cream,

butter the size of an egg. Make into a loaf, baste while roasting.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Veal Loaf.

Two pounds veal minced fine, six crackers rolled fine, two

eggs, four tablespoonfuls of milk, one tablespoonful butter, one

tablespoonful sugar, one tablespoonful salt, one teaspoonful pep-

per. Mix well together, and bake one hour.

MISS MARY BOWDLE.

Bulk Sausage.

One-half as much rolled cracker as sausage. A little more

salt and pepper is required than when meat alone is used.

Make into cakes and fry.

MRS. MARY H. SEEDS.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 20)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 20)

Description

[page 20]

[corresponds to page 15 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 15

Veal Pie.

For a family of four two and one-half pounds veal steak.

Put in kettle with salt and pepper to taste, and water to cover

and boil a few minutes. Take four good sized potatoes cut in

squares, and two onions cut fine, boil until tender. Butter the

size of a small egg. Make a pastry the same as for biscuit.

Line your dish with this rolled quite thin. Put in the veal,

etc., and bake with a cover of crust until done.

MRS. T. W. CRABBE.

Stewed Chicekn.

Cut the chicken up, put into the kettle and cover with water.

Let it cook until tender, then make a thickening of cream and

flour. Add butter, pepper and salt. Have ready a nice short

cake, baked and cut into squares, rolled thin as for crust. Lay the

cakes on the dish, and pour the chicken and gravy over them

while hot.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Smothered Beef.

Take a roast, salt and pepper it and place in a smothering

pan. Have oven hot enough for bread. A piece of beef four

inches thick requires two hours. If you do not have a smoth-

ering pan, use bread pan with a similar one for cover.

Beefsteak Smothered in Oysters.

One pound steak, one pint oysters. Steak fried brown

quickly on one side; turn and pour over it the oysters; season

with salt and pepper; cover and cook till the oysters curl at the

edge, then serve on hot buttered platter.

MISS FLORENCE E. NEWCOMER.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 21)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 21)

Description

[page 21]

[corresponds to page 16 of Delaware Cook Book]

16 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

A Yankee Dish of Chicken.

Clean and joint a nice fat hen. Put to cook in two quarts

boiling water; when half cooked season with salt, pepper and

celery seed. Add boiling water as needed. When the chicken

is tender, you should have a pint of good broth. From this lift

the chicken and fry carefully in butter or dripping until nicely

browned. To the broth add a quart of milk. Take one egg,

two heaping tablespoonfuls flour, and a little milk; stir together

smoothly, and add to the boiling broth to make a nice gravy.

Season to suit. Take one dozen of the Favorite biscuit, split

and lay in the oven to dry and brown very slightly. Drop them

into the gravy, cover for ten minutes where they will keep hot,

but not boil. Dish and serve with the nicely browned chicken.

MRS. IDA M. WARD.

Fried Chicken.

Wash the chickens, cut them in pieces, rub a very little salt

over them, and roll each piece in flour. Put chicken in pan and

fry till a nice brown, in butter, adding at times a little hot water.

Make a gravy of cream and butter; if the cream is not very

thick add a little flour. Season to taste.

MRS. A. C. GRAY.

Chicken Pie.

Boil chicken until tender, (one a year old is best.) Thicken

gravy with flour, add one cup milk, and yolk of one egg well

beaten. Make a rich crust like soda biscuit. Do not have a

bottom crust, but put small bits of dough through the pie, then

pour gravy over and add top crust, rolled one inch thick, with

edge of crust cut in points and turned over. Before baking

brush top with yolk of egg, to make it a nice brown.

MRS. PHILIP PHILLIPS.

Or--Take chicken from the kettle, roll out crust and cut in

squares large enough to wrap each piece separately, pinching to-

gether like little turn-over pies. Bake in quick oven, and in

serving cover with the gravy.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 22)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 22)

Description

[page 22]

[corresponds to page 17 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 17

Oyster Dressing for Turkey.

One pound bread, crumbled fine, one-half pound butter

melted, two stalks celery chopped fine, salt and pepper to taste,

two quarts oysters, strained from their liquor, and carefully

picked over for bits of shell. Mix oysters with bread, and add

enough of their liquor to moisten stuffing well. Fill turkey,

basting with liquor of oysters and water.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Baked Eggs.

Beat the whites of eggs to a stiff froth, salt slightly. Spread

roughly on a platter; make a small cavity for each yolk some

distance apart. Bake till the white is brown.

MISS HELEN MERRICK.

Boiled Eggs.

Put them on in cold water, and when it has boiled the eggs

will be done, the whites being soft and digestible, as they are

not when put on in boiling water.

Puff Omelet.

Stir into the yolks of six eggs and the whites of three

beaten very light, one tablespoonful flour mixed into tea cup of

cream or milk, with salt and pepper to taste; melt one table-

spoonful butter in a pan, pour in the mixture, set the pan into

a hot oven; when it thickens, pour over it the remaining whites

of eggs well beaten, return it to the oven and brown. Slip off

on large plate, and eat as soon as done.

MRS. W. D. HALL.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 23)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 23)

Description

[page 23]

[corresponds to page 18 of Delaware Cook Book]

18 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

W. H. HAGUE,

[Successor to Hague & Beard,]

DENTIST.

OVER CLEVELAND STORE. DELAWARE, OHIO.

GEO. J. HOFFMAN'S

BREAD,

CAKES,

ROLLS,

ALWAYS FRESH.

ALWAYS THE BEST.

DONOVAN BROS.,

DEALERS IN

Fresh and Salt Meats, Lard, Tallow.

No, 73 North Sandusky Street,

DELAWARE, - OHIO.

In following these recipes the best results will always be ob-

tained if you buy the best flour. This can

always be obtained of

WIGHT & ROSE,

19 EAST WINTER STREET.

PRICES RIGHT. 'PHONE 20.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 24)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 24)

Description

[page 24]

[corresponds to page 19 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 19

VEGETABLES.

Boston Baked Beans.

One quart navy beans; put to soak in the morning. At tea

time put on to boil in cold water, let drain until perfectly dry.

Put half of the beans into a gallon jar, add one-half pound

pickled pork cut in thin slices, then add the rest of the beans

and one-half cup molasses or brown sugar. Pour over enough

boiling water to prevent burning. Cover very closely with a

heavy weight on the lid to prevent steam from escaping. Bake

till eight o'clock. Leave in the oven over night so that they

may cook soon in the morning. Add water when needed. Bake

till dinner. Serve with vinegar or syrup, according to taste.

MRS. RACHEL THOMAS.

Baked Beans Without Pork.

One quart beans soaked over night. In the morning, par-

boil with a pinch of salt in the water; drain and add a second

water, cooking till tender, salt to taste. Prepare the following

dressing: One teaspoonful each of butter, flour and vinegar,

mixed to a smooth paste with one beaten egg. Spread over the

top of the beans and bake in a moderate oven till a nice brown.

MRS. M. S. MORGAN.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 25)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 25)

Description

[page 25]

[corresponds to page 20 of Delaware Cook Book]

20 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Baked Green Corn.

One dozen ears green corn, cut through the kernels and

then scraped from the cob, one egg, one tablespoonful melted

butter, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful sugar, one pint

sweet milk. Bake two hours.

MRS. LOUISA REYNOLDS.

Escalloped Corn.

Put a layer of corn in a pudding dish, sprinkle with butter,

pepper and salt, then a layer of rolled cracker crumbs, and so on

to fill the dish; the pour in one cup of sweet milk. Bake one-

half hour.

MRS. E. E. HYATT.

Corn Oysters.

One pint grated corn, two eggs, three tablespoonfuls milk,

one-half cups flour, one tablespoonful butter, one teaspoon-

ful Cleveland baking powder. Fry on a griddle in small cakes.

Asparagus on Toast.

Cut the asparagus into pieces an inch long. Stew till ten-

der; leave enough water to cover; season with salt, pepper and

butter. To the broth add a thickening of flour and cream, tak-

ing care not to get too much flour. Let it boil, then pour over

pieces of buttered toast for each person's sauce dish. Serve

very hot.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.

Beets for all Winter.

Boil beets in the fall. Pack whole in a jar with slices of

horseradish. Cover with cold vinegar in proportion of one

quart vinegar, to one cup sugar, and one cup mustard seed.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 26)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 26)

Description

[page 26]

[corresponds to page 21 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 21

Fried Beats.

Boil till tender; peel and cut in slices one-fourth inch thick;

dust both sides with flour; season with salt and pepper; fry till

brown in a mixture, lard and butter, just enough to keep from

sticking to the pan.

MISS M. R. SMITH.

Creamed Beets.

Boil till tender and cut fine into a sauce pan; season with

salt, pepper, butter, a little cream and flour for the thickening.

Vinegar can be added at the table if desired.

Hot Slaw.

One-half cabbage cut fine; put it into a skillet with hot lard;

pour over it a little water, stew till tender. Mix well one egg,

one tablespoonful flour, butter size of a walnut, one-half cup

vinegar. Pour this over cabbage and boil till done. Salt and

pepper to taste.

MRS. C. F. GRAFF.

Cream Cabbage Salad.

One quart cabbage cut fine, one cup vinegar, one cup thick

sweet cream, four tablespoonfuls sugar, one teaspoonfuls celery

seed. Mix cold in cold crock, adding vinegar last; beat rapidly

with wooden paddle or egg beater till it froths, and it is ready

for use.

MRS. H. ANDERSON.

Dayton, O.

Cold Slaw.

One-half cup vinegar, one-fourth cup sweet cream, one-

fourth cup sugar, one-half teaspoonful celery seed; shred the

cabbage, then chop very fine; salt a little and let it stand an

hour. Then pour over dressing enough to wet nicely.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 27)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 27)

Description

[page 27]

[corresponds to page 22 of Delaware Cook Book]

22 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Lettuce Sandwiches.

Lay crisp lettuce leaves spread over with mayonnaise dress-

ing between thin slices of buttered bread.

Nut Sandwiches.

Blanched almonds and English walnuts, equal parts,

chopped fine; spread thin slices of white bread with butter,

then spread with chopped nuts, adding salt to taste. If the nuts

are too dry add a little thick cream.

HERMIONE NAVE,

Monnett Hall.

Lemon Sandwiches.

One teacupful butter, add yolk of one egg; beat well; one-

fourth teaspoonful mustard, three tablespoonfuls lemon juice;

salt and cayenne to taste. Spread on thin slices of Graham

bread.

MRS. ANNA SEMANS NAVE,

Fort Niobrara, Neb.

Macaroni.

One-half cup macaroni broken into inch pieces. Boil

twenty minutes or until soft, in salted water. Drain in a colan-

der, and pour cold water through it to keep it from sticking.

Put in a shallow baking dish and cover with white sauce made as

follows: One-and-a-half cups milk, one tablespoonful butter,

one-half teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful flour. Cook until it

thickens. Add a layer of grated cheese and cover with cracker

crumbs and bits of butter.

MRS. J. W. BASHFORD.

Steamed Fried Potatoes.

Cover the bottom of a skillet with thin slices of bacon; fry

till ready to turn; having ready thin slices of raw potatoes, put

them into the skillet on the meat and steam until done without

stirring.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 28)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 28)

Description

[page 28]

[corresponds to page 23 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 23

Spanish Potatoes.

Cut raw potatoes in pieces the size of your little finger.

Fry in fat like doughnuts ten minutes, sprinkle with salt and

rush to the table with them in a hot dish.

ALICE LONG.

Turnips.

Slice three large turnips one-fourth inch. Put in a skillet

with one tablespoonful lard. Salt and pepper to taste. Add

water enought to keep from burning. When tender add one

tablespoonful sugar. Cook till a light brown. Take up with-

out breaking, and serve hot.

MRS. RACHEL THOMAS.

Stewed Onions.

Take onions that are fully grown; peel and boil whole in

plenty of water; pour off the water and add fresh boiling water

with a little salt, and when tender pour off again; season with

pepper and butter, and a little flour and water thickening, with

enough vinegar to suit the taste; stew a few minutes and serve.

Add more butter at the table.

Buttered Parsnips.

"Fair words butter, no parsnips."

Peel and slice in thin, flat lengthwise slices, about one-third

of an inch thick; put in cold water from two to four hours, and

when ready to cook have a broad skillet in which melt some

butter and lard together, or all butter, if preferred. A lump the

size of a walnut is enough for half a dozen parsnips. Lay the

parsnip slices in closely so they may brown nicely; sprinkle a

little salt over them and a little sugar, which helps to brown

them. Cover with water, put a lid over them, and stew till ten-

der. If not nearly boiled dry by that time remove the lid; turn,

brown both sides. Eat with butter.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.

Delaware Cook Book (p. 29)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 29)

Description

[page 29]

[corresponds to page 24 of Delaware Cook Book]

24 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

India Curry.

Stew meat or chicken until tender; season with salt and

pepper; slice finely a small onion, put it in a skillet with a table-

spoonful of butter and brown thoroughly; mix one tablespoon-

ful of Crosse & Blackwell'e curry powder with a little water

into a smooth paste; turn this into the skillet, brown awhile,

then turn in the meat or chicken, cover and allow to simmer for

ten minutes; add a tablespoonful of cream or milk, and just be-

fore serving squeeze in the juice of a small lemon. Serve with

boiled rice. Grate a small cocoanut, pour boiling water on it;

squeeze out this juice and use the liquid instead of milk or cream

and the curry will be richer.

To serve the rice as it is served in India, each grain being

separate, allow one quart of water to each cup of rice; wash

thoroughly, salt the water, and when boiling add rice; cook

until tender, but not until soft.

MRS. W. F. OLDHAM.

Rice Croquettes.

One teacupful cold boiled rice; one teaspoonful each sugar,

cinnamon and melted butter; with half as much salt. Shape into

oval balls and dip into beaten egg, followed by a dipping in

cracker crumbs. Fry in hot lard, and when done to a nice

brown, put into a heated colander.

MISS NELLIE GRAFF.

Steamed Rice.

One cup rice, three pints milk, one teaspoonful salt, butter

size of walnut; Steam one-and-a-half hours. Serve with cream

and sugar.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 30)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 30)

Description

[page 30]

[corresponds to page 25 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 25

A Pretty Side Dish.

Take small white turnips, scoop out the inside, leaving the

shell about one inch thick. Boil in clear water till tender.

Serve on platter each filled with French peas, seasoned with

butter, pepper and salt.

MRS. NAVE.

Tomato Omelet.

One quart tomatoes chopped fine (after the skin is removed)

and put into a sauce pan with two chopped onions, a little

butter, salt and pepper, one rolled cracker; cover tight, and let

it simmer about an hour, beat five eggs to a froth; have your

griddle hot; grease it well; stir the eggs into the tomato; beat

together and pour into the griddle; brown on one side, fold and

brown on the other. To be served very hot.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Baked Onions.

Select large onions and place in a hot oven, without peel-

ing; bake three-quarters of an hour, keeping the oven closed to

prevent odor from escaping. When done remove the outside

and dress with butter, pepper and salt.

MRS. M. A. DAVIS.

Baked Tomatoes.

Cut a thin slice from blossom side of twelve smooth ripe

tomatoes. With a teaspoon remove the pulp without breaking

the shell; take a small, solid head of cabbage and one onion;

chop fine; add bread crumbs rubbed fine, and pulp of tomato;

stuff each tomato; put the slice in its place, lay them stem end

down in a buttered dish with a little water on them and a little

butter on each. Bake until thoroughly done.

MRS. PHILIP PHILLIPS.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 31)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 31)

Description

[page 31]

[corresponds to page 26 of Delaware Cook Book]

26 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Cleveland's

Baking Powder,

Manufactured originally by Cleveland Brothers, Albany, N.Y.,

now by the Cleveland Baking Powder Company, New York,

has been used by American housewives for twenty-five years,

and those who have used it longest praise it most.

It is perfectly pure and wholesome.

Its composition is stated on every can.

It is always uniform and reliable.

It does the most work and the best work.

It is the strongest of all pure cream of tartar powders, as

shown by the U.S. and Canadian Govt. Reports.

All the leading teachers of cookery and writers on domestic

science use and recommend it, as:--

Mrs. Sarah T. Rorer,

Prin. Philadelphia Cooking School.

Mrs. Carrie M. Dearborn,

Late Prin. Boston Cooking School.

Miss Fannie M. Farmer,

Principal Boston Cooking School.

Marion Harland,

Author "Common Sense in the Household."

Mrs. Kate E. Whitaker, Supt. Cookery in Public Schools, San Francisco, Cal.

Mrs. Emma P. Ewing,

Prin. Chautauqua School of Cookery.

Mrs. A. D. Lincoln,

Author of "Boston Cook Book."

Mrs. C. C. Bedford,

Supt. New York Cooking School.

Mrs. Eliza R. Parker,

Author "Economical Housekeeping."

Our book of 400 choice receipts mailed free. Send stamp and address.

Cleveland Baking Powder Company, 81 & 83 Fulton Street, New York.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 32)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 32)

Description

[page 32]

[corresponds to page 27 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 27

BREAD AND ROLLS.

Here's bread which strengthens men's hearts,

And therefore is called "The staff of life."

Potato Bread.

Four potatoes boiled and mashed, one teaspoonful of salt,

one cake compressed yeast dissolved in lukewarm water, two

quarts warm water, and flour to make a soft dough. Let it

stand over night in a warm place, to rise. In the morning

mould into small loaves and bake.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Yeast.

Three large potatoes boiled in two quarts of water with a

handful of hops in a bag; mash potatoes with one-half cup

sugar, one tablespoonful of salt. When cool enough add one

cup yeast; beat well, and let stand twenty-four hours, then seal

and put in a cool dark place. Two-thirds cup of yeast for five

or six loaves of bread.

MRS. EUNICE LEEPER.

IX O'Clock Bread.

Scald one pint water and one pint sweet milk together;

pour in a pan large enough to mix the bread, and add to this

one small spoonful each of sugar, lard and salt; when lukewarm

add one cake compressed yeast softened in a little warm water;

stir in the flour and knead well; not too stiff; cover and leave on

the table in warm room. Next morning knead out in pans, and

bake after it has become sufficiently light.

MRS. R. L. SEEDS.

Van Ness Loaf.

One-half cup molasses, one cup white flour, two cups brown

flour, one-and-a-half cups sour milk, one teaspoonful soda.

Steam two hours, then brown slightly in the oven.

MRS. PHILIP PHILLIPS.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 33)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 33)

Description

[page 33]

[corresponds to page 28 of Delaware Cook Book]

28 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Bread.

For three quarts of sponge. At noon three large potatoes

boiled and mashed with one batterspoonful flour. Pour over it

the potato water; add flour for stiff batter, two-thirds cup yeast,

salt, sugar, and lard the size of an egg. Kneed one-half hour;

let rise again. When light mould into loaves.

MRS. EUNICE LEEPER.

Mississippi Egg Bread.

On one pint of salted corn meal pour boiling water enough

to thoroughly scald it; set aside for half and hour; one egg, one

cup sour milk, scant teaspoonful soda, one large tablespoonful

melted lard beaten well into the corn meal, then add flour to

make thick as pancake batter; bake in a large cake on a griddle

closely covered; turn. Serve hot with syrup.

MRS. M. S. MORGAN.

Brown Bread.

One and one-fourth cups corn meal, three-fourths cup white

flour, one-half cup molasses, three-fourths cup sweet milk, one-

and-one fourth cups sour milk, salt, one teaspoonful soda; cover

closely and steam four hours.

MRS. J. W. BASHFORD.

Boston Brown Bread.

Two cups Indian meal, three cups Graham flour, one cup

Orleans molasses, one tablespoonful soda, salt, sour milk enough

to make a stiff batter. Steam three-and-a-half hours in a pud-

ding bucket, then brown in the oven.

MRS. V. R. DUCKWORTH.

Brown Bread.

Four cups Graham flour, one teaspoonful salt, one teaspoon-

ful soda sifted with the flour, three-fourths cup Orleans

molasses, one pint sour milk.

MISS MARY BOWDLE.

Pocketbook Rolls.

One quart flour, three large teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder, one tablespoonful cold butter, one teaspoonful salt, one

spoonful sugar, one egg well beaten; roll well into the flour,
Delaware Cook Book (p. 34)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 34)

Description

[page 34]

[corresponds to page 29 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 29

then add one pint of cold milk; roll out one-half inch thick; spread

butter over the top of each, fold one half over the other. Bake

in a quick oven. If the tops are rubbed with milk it gives a

glaze.

MRS. CARRIE MORRISON.

Rusk.

One-and-a-half pints water, three-fourths cup of lard, three-

fourths cup of sugar, two eggs, one cup good yeast, flour for

stiff batter; set in a warm place to rise; mould twice, the third

time into rolls.

MRS. REV. J. F. BROWN.

Parker House Rolls.

One cup warm new milk, one cup yeast, two tablespoonfuls

each sugar and melted lard, one quart flour, or enough to mould

firm. Let it rise till light: roll one-half inch thick; cut out;

butter the tops, fold over; let rise again and bake in a quick

oven.

MRS. H. MOORE.

Favorite Biscuit.

Two quarts flour, one heaping tablespoonful soda, two heaping

teaspoonfuls cream of tarter, one level teaspoonful salt; all mixed

thoroughly with the flour, one pint sour cream, and as much

buttermilk as needed to make a soft dough. With as little hand-

ling as possible roll three-fourths of an inch thick; cut out and

place in the pan so they will not touch; pick with a fork. In

the absence of sour cream use lard or butter the size of an egg

in the flour, and mix with buttermilk or sour milk.

MRS. IDA M. WARD.

Soda Biscuit.

Two and two-thirds pints flour, two tablespoonfuls shorten-

ing, one pint sweet milk, one tablespoonful sugar, one teaspoon-

ful soda and two teaspoonfuls cream tartar, or three teaspoon-

fuls Cleveland's baking powder, one teaspoonful salt. Put the

flour, soda, sugar and cream tartar in a sieve and mix; then rub

in shortening evenly, wet with the milk; roll nearly one inch

thick; cut out; work rapidly as possible. Warm the pans and let

rise three or four minutes. Bake in quick oven fifteen minutes.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 35)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 35)

Description

[page 35]

[corresponds to page 30 of Delaware Cook Book]

30 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

THE BEST BRANDS OF FLOUR!

Pride of Delaware.

Acme.

Silver Dust.

For Sale at all Groceries

and at Mill.

E. SNYDER.

They say that we are a poet,

And to our mother we owe it.

We don't think we are below it,

Even tho' we don't show it.

Should they continue to bestow it.

We never will blow it.

CALL AT

City Steam Laundry and Dye Works,

for anything you want done to clothing.

SOUTH MAIN STREET. J.F. SHULTZ.

N. WAGNER

UNDERTAKER

28 East William Street.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 36)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 36)

Description

[page 36]

[corresponds to page 31 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 31

MUFFINS AND GEMS.

Fried Graham Muffins.

One cup Graham flour, one cup white flour, one cup milk,

two teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder, one egg, one tea-

spoonful salt. Beat well; take up a rounding spoonful of batter

and drop in hot fat and fry like doughnuts. These are very

light and tender.

MISS BESSIE CALHOUN.

Corn Gems.

Two-and-a-half cups sour milk, two cups corn meal, one-half

cup sugar, two eggs, one cup white flour, one tablespoonful lard

or butter, one teaspoonful each soda and salt. Have pans smok-

ing hot; bake in a quick oven. Cast iron pans are the best.

MRS. J. A. WHETSEL.

Clifton Corn Gems.

One cup sweet milk, one egg, two-thirds cup corn meal, one

and one-third cups flour, one tablespoonful butter, two table-

spoonfuls sugar, two scant teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder. Makes one dozen gems.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Johnny Cake.

Two cups corn meal, one egg, one cup white flour, one

tablespoonful lard, one-half teaspoonful soda, sour milk to make

stiff batter. Bake in a hot oven.

MRS. C. GURLEY.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 37)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 37)

Description

[page 37]

[corresponds to page 32 of Delaware Cook Book]

32 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Niagara Corn Bread.

Two eggs, two cups sweet milk, one-half cup sugar, one-

and-a-half cups corn meal, one-and-a-half cups flour, two tea-

spoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder, butter half size egg; bake

one-half hour.

MRS. LENA BRITTAIN.

Muffins.

Two eggs, pinch of salt, one pint of milk, one teaspoonful

sugar, three cups flour, butter size of an egg, three teaspoonfuls

Cleveland's baking powder. Mix eggs, milk, sugar and salt, then

flour, then baking powder, and lastly melted butter. Beat well

before and after adding butter.

MRS. EUGENE POLLOCK.

Pop-overs.

Two cups flour, two cups milk, two eggs, one teaspoonful

butter, salt. Bake in cups in a quick oven fifteen minutes.

Serve hot with sweet sauce.

MRS. CARRIE MORRISON.

Quick Muffins.

One egg, one-and-a-half tablespoonfuls sugar, one cup sweet

milk, a little butter, one teaspoonful Cleveland's baking powder,

flour to make a thin batter.

MRS. W. D. CHERINGTON.

Brown Gems.

Mix one quart water with sufficient Graham flour to make

moderately stiff batter. Add three tablespoonfuls of yeast and a

little salt. Let rise over night. Put in warm gem pans. Prac-

tice will teach just the consistency of the batter.

MRS. T. CRAVEN.

Corn Bread.

One egg, one heaping tablespoonful sugar, one teaspoonful

salt, one pint sour milk, two cups corn meal, cup flour, then an-

other pint of milk and two teaspoonfuls soda dissolved in the

milk. Bake in an iron skillet in a very hot oven, or in cakes on

a griddle.

MISS LIZZIE DEWAR.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 38)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 38)

Description

[page 38]

[corresponds to page 33 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 33

Corn Gems.

One-half pint corn meal, one tablespoonful white sugar,

one-half pint flour, two heaping teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder, two eggs, salt. Mix together thoroughly while dry,

then add well-beaten eggs and cold sweet milk or milk and

water to make a moderately thin batter. Bake in gem pans or

muffin rings.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Common Griddle Cakes.

One pint sour milk or buttermilk, one or two eggs, salt, one

teaspoonful soda; flour to make a thin batter.

Griddle Cakes.

Three cups flour, two teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking pow-

der, two eggs, one teaspoonful salt, sweet milk to make a soft

batter.

Crumb Griddle Cakes.

One quart sour milk, four eggs, one cup bread crumbs, two

teaspoonfuls soda dissolved in water, one tablespoonful butter.

Soak the crumbs in the milk over night; in the morning rub

through a sieve, and add the other ingredients with enough

corn meal to make pancake batter.

Anti-Worry Receipt.

Do you wish a receipt for preventing all worry,

For giving composure and freedom from hurry?

Just think of one fact, which is true you will find,

When anything happens to flurry your mind,

First, something or nothing there is to be done;

First, nothing or something, that's clear as the sun;

If something, then do it and make no delay;

If nothing, all thought of it cast far away,

This simplest of rules if you will only obey,

Will free you from wrinkles for many a day.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 39)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 39)

Description

[page 39]

[corresponds to page 34 of Delaware Cook Book]

34 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

MRS. M. W. NEWMAN,

Millinery and Dressmaking,

23 West Winter Street,

DELAWARE, - OHIO.

W. M. HESELTINE & CO.,

are HEADQUARTERS for

DRESS GOODS.

SEE OUR

KID GLOVES.

Around the Corner on Winter Street.

BODURTHA,

Photographer!

calls your attention to the latest and best thing in the way of portraits,

The "Aristo Platino," or Mat Surface.

Call and See Them.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 40)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 40)

Description

[page 40]

[corresponds to page 35 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 35

SALADS AND SAUCES.

The veins unfilled--our blood is cold and then

We pout upon the morning, are unapt

To give or to forgive; but when we have stuffed

These pipes and these conveyances of blood

With drinks and feeding, we have suppler souls

Than in our priest-like fasts.

--Coriolanus, V, I.

Chicken Salad.

One chicken, one teaspoonful mustard, four good-sized

bunches celery, two teacupfuls melted butter, four hard boiled

eggs, one-half teaspoonful pepper, salt to your taste. Chop the

chicken, celery and eggs quite fine (separately), then mix them;

add the mustard, salt, pepper and melted butter; lastly, add

some good cider vinegar, sufficient quantity to make the whole

moist. Be careful not to chop the chicken and celery too fine.

MRS. J, P. LONG.

Cabbage Salad.

One quart cabbage chopped fine. Make a dressing with the

yolks of two or three hard boiled eggs rubbed smooth, butter

the size of an egg, melted, one tablespoonful sugar, one-half

tablespoonful salt, one-half teaspoonful pepper, and one-half

teacupful cider vinegar; heat together, and when cool mix thor-

oughly with the cabbage. Use the whites of the eggs for gar-

nishing.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Potato Salad.

Cut in small pieces six potatoes, three onions (small), salt

and pepper to taste. Dressing: Three well-beaten eggs, three

tablespoonfuls vinegar, butter the size of an egg, salt, pepper

and mustard. Put on stove and stir constantly until like cust-

ard, then pour over potatoes.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 41)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 41)

Description

[page 41]

[corresponds to page 36 of Delaware Cook Book]

36 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Potato Salad.

Boil twelve medium sized potatoes with the skins on. When

done, pare and chop, not too fine; chop six hard-boiled eggs and

a small onion, or if onions are not liked, one bunch of celery;

mix all together, salt and pepper to taste; take a scant cupful of

vinegar and lump of butter the size of a walnut, and put on the

stove and let it heat; when at the boiling point add one egg.

well beaten, one large spoonful sour cream, one heaping tea-

spoonful of Kingsford's corn starch and one-half cup sugar.

When ready to boil, pour over potatoes, and, if desired, add

celery seed.

MRS. WILL A. ULREY.

Tomato Jelly--For Salad.

One can tomatoes, strain, add one ounce gelatine dissolved

in a very little water; season with salt and pepper; pour into

small moulds; egg cups or egg shells will do. When stiff, serve

on lettuce leaves with mayonnaise sauce.

MRS. ANNA SEMANS NAVE.

Salmon Salad.

Six hard boiled eggs, chop not too fine, one can salmon,

drain off oil, salt and pepper to taste, one-half teaspoonful mus-

tard, wet with two dessertspoonfuls vinegar; mix all thoroughly.

Put salad on platter, squeeze the juice from a lemon over it, and

garnish platter with curled parsley or celery leaves.

MISS KATE LONG.

Salad Dressing.

Three eggs, one teaspoonful salt, two tablespoonfuls butter,

one-half teaspoonful white pepper, two tablespoonfuls sugar

one cup vinegar, one-half tablespoonful mustard. Cook in a

double boiler until it thickens like soft custard; add one-half cup

cream before using.

MRS. J. W. BASHFORD.

Salad Dressing.

Two tablespoonfuls mustard, two tablespoonfuls salt, two

tablespoonfuls sugar, two tablespoonfuls corn starch. Mix well

together, then add two tablespoonfuls sweet oil, two tablespoon-

fuls cream, one cup water, one cup vinegar, six well-beaten eggs,

a little cayenne pepper (careful).

MISS LIZZIE EDWARDS.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 42)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 42)

Description

[page 42]

[corresponds to page 37 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 37

PICKLES AND RELISHES.

"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers."

Spanish Pickles.

One peck green tomatoes, one dozen onions, one dozen

cucumbers, two heads cabbage, one head cauliflower, one pound

Coleman's mustard, one-half pound white mustard seed, two

pounds brown sugar, two ounces celery seed, five cents worth

turmeric. Cut cucumbers, tomatoes and onions and put each

separately in salt water over night. Put everything on to cook

except Coleman's mustard and turmeric. After stewing twenty

minutes, dissolve mustard and turmeric like making starch and

add to the mixture. Use vinegar sufficient to cover.

MRS. J. M. MOYER.

Spiced Peaches.

One peck peaches, one pint vinegar, three pounds sugar,

one teaspoonful cinnamon and one teaspoonful mace or cloves.

MRS. L. S. REYNOLDS.

Green Tomato Pickles.

Select firm, light green tomatoes, cut in slices without peel-

ing. Let them lie in weak salt water twenty-four hours, then

rinse in cold water. Put in a fruit kettle and cover with vine-

gar. One quart vinegar, two quarts sugar, one ounce whole

cloves, one ounce sliced ginger root, one ounce cassia buds, one

ounce cinnamon sticks, one ounce mace. Cook the ginger root

in the vinegar; add other spices just before removing from the

stove.

MRS. W. W. WILLIAMS.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 43)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 43)

Description

[page 43]

[corresponds to page 38 of Delaware Cook Book]

38 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Whole Tomatoes for Winter Use.

Fill a large stone jar with ripe and perfect whole tomatoes,

adding a few cloves and a sprinkling of sugar between the

layers. Cover well with vinegar and water mixed, half and

half. Place a piece of thick flannel over the jar, letting it fall

well down into the vinegar. Then tie down with cover of brown

paper. No harm is done if the flannel collects mould. They

will keep all winter.

MRS. BARBARA JOHNSON.

Cucumber Pickles.

To every one hundred pickles one cupful of salt.

Pour over them boiling water to cover. Let it stand for

stand three days, then pour off the brine. Boil and skim and

pour on again boiling hot, (the more you boil the brine the bet-

ter it is); let them stand two days. Then take them out of the

brine and boil in one quart rain water to one pint vinegar. Take

out, dry with a towel, and pack in jars. Now boil the spices,

whole cloves and stick cinnamon in bags, in one gallon vinegar;

two and one-half pounds brown sugar. Pour over the pickles

boiling hot. Skim off the cloves and cinnamon, and lay on top

of the pickles whole grains of white mustard seed, celery seed,

allspice, pieces of horse radish and one or two small red peppers

to each jar. Lay on top of each jar a green grape leaf. Cover

with white paper, and last tie over cotton batting.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Sweet Peppers.

Take large ripe peppers; cut the top partly off and remove

seeds; then lay in salt water over night. Cut cabbage fine, salt

it a little and let stand over night or a few hours; then squeeze

it dry as possible. Mix plenty of celery seed in it and stuff the

peppers, tying on the tops with a cord. Take good cider vine-

gar, make very sweet, and season to suit the taste with stick cin-

namon, cloves and allspice. Boil down pretty thick and pour

over them. Large peaches can be used in the same way.

MRS. M. J. MOYER.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 44)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 44)

Description

[page 44]

[corresponds to page 39 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 39

Pear Pickles.

Prepare syrup made in the proportion of one quart vinegar,

three pints sugar. Boil and skim. Peel the fruit and cut in

halves, (or leave whole if small); cook in the vinegar till a sil-

ver fork will easily pierce them. Sprinkle over bits of cinna-

mon bark and a few cloves. If perfectly done will keep two

years.

MRS. S. B. LOADER.

Cucumber Catsup.

Pare and grate fresh green cucumbers, put in a cloth and

squeeze out the water. Put the pulp into a porcelain kettle,

and three-fourths as much good cider vinegar as water strained

off, but do not use the water. Season with salt, cayenne pepper,

sugar, and some like the flavor of onion. Let it come to a boil,

bottle and seal. This is excellent with raw oysters.

MISS ELLEN R. MARTIN.

Tomato Catsup.

Three quarts strained tomato sauce, one-and-a-half teacup-

fuls strong cider vinegar, one teacupful brown sugar, one table-

spoonful black pepper, one tablespoonful salt, two tablespoonfuls

ginger, two tablespoonfuls ground cloves, one tablespoonful cin-

namon. Peel and cook the tomatoes until soft, then rub through

a sieve to remove all seeds. Add the salt first, then boil and

skim well; next add the sugar and vinegar; when boiled as

thick as desired put in the spices and take off soon as scalded.

Bottle for use. This will keep for several years.

MISS MARY R. SMITH.

Chili Sauce.

Eighteen ripe tomatoes, one green pepper, one onion, one

cup sugar, one tablespoonful salt, two tablespoonfuls all kinds

ground spices, two cupfuls best vinegar. Chop fine tomatoes,

onion and pepper. Boil two hours and bottle for use.

MISS MARY BOWDLE.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 45)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 45)

Description

[page 45]

[corresponds to page 40 of Delaware Cook Book]

40 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Chili Sauce.

Four large onions, three tablespoonfuls salt, eight table-

spoonfuls sugar, eight cupfuls vinegar, four teaspoonfuls cinna-

mon, eight sweet red peppers, four teaspoonfuls ginger, three

teaspoonfuls cloves, three teaspoonfuls nutmeg, twenty-four

large ripe tomatoes. All chopped fine. Boil all together two

hours. Cucumbers may be added, about six large yellow ones

peeled, the seeds taken out and chopped fine and boiled with the

rest.

MRS. J. M. SYCKS.

Chili Sauce.

Fourteen ripe tomatoes, two good-sized onions, one coffee

cupful sugar, three red peppers, two and one-half cupfuls cider

vinegar, one teaspoonful salt. Spices to taste. It is better with-

out spices. Cut onion and tomatoes in large pieces. Boil all

together one and one-half hours. Stir occasionally to prevent

scorching.

MRS. RACHEL M. THOMAS.

Sweet Picklette.

Four large heads cabbage chopped fine, one-fourth peck

onions, two quarts cider vinegar, two tablespoonfuls black pep-

per, two tablespoonfuls turmeric, two pounds sugar, two table-

spoonfuls ground mustard, two tablespoonfuls celery seed,

three tablespoonfuls cinnamon. Mix cabbage and onion; salt

thoroughly, and let stand over night, then drain off the water.

Mix with the vinegar, sugar and spices. Heat slowly. Boil

for ten minutes. Seal.

MRS. ABBIE M. SEMANS.

"Where is the peck of pickled peppers that Peter Piper picked?"

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 46)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 46)

Description

[page 46]

[corresponds to page 41 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 41

PRESERVES AND JELLIES.

"Sweets to the sweet." --Shakespeare.

Quince Honey.

One quart water, three pounds white sugar, boil and skim.

To large quinces--grated. Put all together and boil until thick

as honey.

MRS. CARY.

Quince Honey.

Five pounds granulated sugar, one-half pint water. Cook

until sugar is thoroughly dissolved, then add six grated quinces

and cook twenty minutes, or until thick as honey.

MRS. GEORGIA A. GRIMES.

Pineapple Preserves.

Pare and core, and cut in small slices on a slaw cutter. To

one pound pineapple allow one pound sugar; let it boil twenty

minutes; put in jars and seal.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Grape Preserves.

Press with the fingers the pulp from the fruit; boil the

pulp, then press through a colander or sieve to remove the

seeds; put juice, pulp and skins together, and to every pint add

one pound sugar, boil until thick.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 47)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 47)

Description

[page 47]

[corresponds to page 42 of Delaware Cook Book]

42 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Reduced R. R. Fares

AT

W. E. Wight's Ticket Office.

Decorations, Cut Roses and Carnations a Specialty.

We don't want the earth, but we do want you to know that the place to

Save Money is to buy your

Cut Flowers,

Floral Designs,

AND

Bedding Plants,

AT

JOS. H. CUNNINGHAM'S.

[image of greenhouse]

Greenhouse: 325 West William St. Telephone 143.

Orders Promptly Attended to. DELAWARE, OHIO.

SCHREYER BROS.,

THE ONLY EXCLUSIVE

FURNITURE DEALERS

in Delaware. We are thereby enabled to give customers better goods and

later styles at less money than any dealer in Delaware. Give us a call.

NO. 30 SOUTH MAIN STREET, DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 48)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 48)

Description

[page 48]

[corresponds to page 43 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 43

Drop Jelly.

One quart fruit, one quart sugar. Put in porcelain kettle

on back of stove, until sugar is dissolved, then allow to boil rap-

idly twenty minutes. Pour into jelly glasses.

MRS. E. J. REED.

Dayton, Ohio.

Blackberry Jam.

To one quart berries, add one quart granulated sugar. Wash

berries, turn into a colander. When drained, put into a new tin

kettle one-half the berries, then one-half the sugar, then berries,

then sugar. Let heat slowly, until sugar is melted. Watch

closely; stir as little as possible. Cook until juice is jellied.

MRS. RACHEL THOMAS.

Orange Marmalade.

Slice twelve oranges and six lemons very thin on plates, so

as not to lose the juice, removing the seeds; pour into a basin

with six pints cold water, and let it stand twelve hours. Boil

for two and one-half hours, then add eight pounds white sugar,

then boil three-fourths of an hour, and you will have thirteen

glasses of good marmalade.

MRS. J. K. NEWCOMER.

BERVERLY W. BROWN. EDGAR C. ADAIR.

B. W. BROWN & CO.,

"SPOT CASH"

SHOE HOUSE.

DELAWARE - OHIO.

We Solicit Your Patronage and Guarantee Satisfaction.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 49)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 49)

Description

[page 49]

[corresponds to page 44 of Delaware Cook Book]

44 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

DESSERTS.

"If all had their deserts, who'd 'scape a whipping."--Hamlet.

Strawberry Shortcake.

Make biscuit dough with Cleveland's baking powder; cut

into large biscuit; bake, split, butter, and cover with mashed

fruit; place on dish for the table, and over all pour a little sweet

cream.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Strawberry Cake.

One cup sugar, two eggs, one tablespoonful butter, one

cupful sweet milk, three teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder,

three cupfuls of flour, or more, if not stiff enough; rub butter

and sugar together; beat in the yolks, then milk; mix baking

powder with flour; bake in jellycake pans. While hot, butter

and add strawberries, crushed and sweetened to taste, between

each layer of cake. Serve with rich cream or whipped cream.

MISS EVA THOMAS.

Apple Tapioca.

One-half teacupful tapioca, five small apples. Soak tapioca

three hours in one pint of water; pare and core the apples, fill

the holes with sugar and stick two cloves in each; pour the

tapioca over the apples in a pudding dish and bake till the ap-

ples are tender. Be careful not to have the tapioca too thick.

Eat with hard sauce or cream.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 50)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 50)

Description

[page 50]

[corresponds to page 45 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 45

Apple Dumplings.

For paste take one-half pint sour milk, one-third teaspoon-

ful soda, one-half cupful lard; rub in the flour; mix soft; roll

out and cut in squares; pare apples and cut in halves; put one-

half to each dumpling, and place them close together in a bread

pan. Take one-half pint granulated sugar and fill the cup with

boiling water; pour over and bake in a quick oven. Serve with

cream.

MRS. REV. NEIL.

Apple Jack.

Two eggs, one cup sugar, butter size of egg, two-thirds cup-

ful sweet milk, one tablespoonful Cleveland's baking powder.

Prepare apples as for pie and half fill a two-quart pan; pour the

batter over the apples and bake twenty minutes. When done

turn upside down on a plate, and stir into the apples butter and

sugar; then sprinkle over sugar and cinnamon.

MRS. J. L. KRAEMER.

Apple Snow.

One grated apple, sprinkled with sugar while grating, to

prevent turning dark; drop into the white of one egg; beat

thirty minutes.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Float.

Put in a double kettle one and one-half pints of milk, let

come to a boiling heat; then add the beaten yolk of one egg, two

tablespoonfuls sugar, pinch salt, one dessertspoonful Kingsford's

cornstarch, wet with a little milk. Mix all together; pour slowly

into the boiling milk; let boil until it thickens; remove from

stove; flavor with one teaspoonful vanilla; pour in dish; beat

the white of the egg to stiff froth, drop with teaspoon over

the top.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 51)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 51)

Description

[page 51]

[corresponds to page 46 of Delaware Cook Book]

46 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Blanc Mange.

Soak over night one-half cupful tapioca; put in custard

kettle with eight tablespoonfuls sugar, little salt and one quart

milk. After boiling fifteen minutes add whites of three eggs

beaten very light; let boil three minutes, then add three table-

spoonfuls Kingsford's cornstarch and three tablespoonfuls

sugar dissolved with one-half pint milk and beaten yolks of

three eggs; let boil up. After taking from stove, flavor, and serve

cool, with jelly in center and whipped cream.

MRS. LENA BRITTIAN.

Strawberry or Orange Float.

Yolks of three eggs, one tablespoonful butter, two table-

spoonfuls Kingsford's cornstarch, a little sugar and salt. Mix

well and pour into one pint of boiling milk; flavor to taste,

placing the fruit in a dish covered well with sugar, and over this

pour the hot mixture. If a glass dish is used put it in a silver

spoon to prevent breaking.

MRS. JAMES A. BARNES.

Apple Dumplings.

Make dough as for baking powder biscuit, roll out and cut

in squares. Have ready apples cut in halves; roll each half in

one of the squares of dough, place in baking pan close together,

putting on top of each a little butter, sugar, cinnamon and flour,

then fill in to half depth of dumpling with boiling water. Bake

until a light brown.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Cherry Russe.

Take the juice from one can black cherries, and with it

make about a pint of jelly with gelatine; put it in the middle of

a glass dish and around it arrange whipped cream with the cher-

ries scattered over it. The gelatine should be clear and will

look like opal. A very pretty and palatable dish.

MRS. CORA CALHOUN LOWRY.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 52)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 52)

Description

[page 52]

[corresponds to page 47 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 47

Charlotte Russe.

One quart whipped cream, whites of five eggs, six table-

spoonfuls white sugar whipped with eggs; flavor to taste with

lemon or vanilla. Line a dish with lady fingers, or sponge cake,

and pour the russe in the center. To be served very cold.

MRS. J. M. ARMSTRONG.

Spanish Cream.

One quart milk, one-half box Cox's gelatine, or eight sheets,

four eggs, beaten separately, two tablespoonfuls granulated

sugar, pinch salt, vanilla. Put gelatine in the milk and heat

until gelatine is dissolved; then stir in the yolks and sugar

beaten together; cook until a little thicker than float; stir in the

whites well beaten; serve cold with cream.

MRS. HATTIE FORGY.

Spanish Charlotte.

Place crumbs of stale cake or rolled crackers on the bottom

of a pudding dish, and put a layer of any kind of jelly or fruit

over them. Continue alternately until the dish is nearly full,

making the crumbs form the top; pour a custard over it and

bake. Serve with sauce or whipped cream.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Spanish Cream.

One-and-a-half quarts new milk, one-half box Cox's gelatine,

one-half pound granulated sugar, six eggs. Flavor with

vanilla; put the gelatine in the milk and set on stove until the

gelatine is dissolved; do not let it boil. Beat the sugar and

yolks very light, pour the milk on the beaten yolks; set it on

the stove until it is as thick as cream, stirring it all the time.

When thick, let it cool, then add the vanilla and whites of the

eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, pour in cups and use next day.

Can be served with lemon jelly.

LEMON JELLY.--One-half box Cox's gelatine dissolved in

one-half pint cold water, add one-and-a-half pints boiling water;

one pound granulated sugar, rinds and juice of two lemons, one

orange; strain through fine cloth; let stand until next day.

MISS EVA WOTTRING.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 53)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 53)

Description

[page 53]

[corresponds to page 48 of Delaware Cook Book]

48 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

KINGSFORD'S

OSWEGO

CORN STARCH

THE "ORIGINAL."

Indispensable in Good Cooking.

For the Laundry

SILVER GLOSS

Strongest and Best.

Kingsford's "Pure" Starch

Economical but Perfectly Pure.

Laundro THE PERFECT COLDWATER STARCH

T. KINGSFORD & SON, Manufacturers, OSWEGO, N.Y.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 54)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 54)

Description

[page 54]

[corresponds to page 49 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 49

PUDDINGS AND SAUCES.

Suet Pudding. No. 1.

One cup Orleans molasses, one cup chopped suet, one cup

sweet milk, one teaspoonful soda. Dissolve soda in milk, a

pinch of salt, one cup currants; any fruit can be added; raisins

and citron, in any quantity desired. Boil in a bag, or steam in

a dish two-and-a-half hours.

MRS. M. A. MITCHELL.

Suet Pudding. No. 2.

One teacupful raisins, one cupful chopped suet, one cupful

molasses, one cupful sweet milk, one teaspoonful soda, three

cupfulls flour; flavor with cinnamon; steam three hours, and eat

with hot sauce.

MRS. J. F. LLOYD.

Suet Pudding. No. 3.

One cupful brown sugar, one cupful chopped suet, one cup-

ful raisins, three cupfuls bread crumbs, one cupful flour, one

cupful sour milk, with one teaspoonful soda, or one cupful

sweet milk and three teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder.

Boil three hours, and make sauce to suit taste.

MRS. LOUISE REYNOLDS.

Suet Pudding, No. 4.

One pint flour, one heaping teaspoonful baking powder, one

teaspoonful salt, two teaspoonfuls cinnamon. Sift all in the

flour; one-half pint chopped suet; mix well, then add one-half

pint (full) each chopped raisins and dates, and one dozen English

walnuts, chopped. Use milk or cold coffee to make a soft dough.

SAUCE.--Two tablespoonfuls flour, one pint sugar; mix

well into one cupful butter; pour over these one quart boiling

water, and cook till it is full of bubbles. Flavor with one tea-

spoonful each of vanilla and lemon extract.

MRS. ANNA SEMANS NAVE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 55)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 55)

Description

[page 55]

[corresponds to page 50 of Delaware Cook Book]

50 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Baroness Pudding.

Three-fourths pound suet, three-fourths pound seeded

raisins, three-fourths pound flour, one-fourth saltspoonful salt.

Chop suet fine, and mix with raisins, salt and flour; moisten

with the milk; stir well, and tie in a floured cloth wet pre-

viously in warm water. Put pudding in boiling water, and let

boil without ceasing for four-and-a-half hours. Serve with sifted

sugar.

MISS FLORETTE MCKENZIE.

Orange Float.

One quart water, juice and pulp of two lemons, one cupful

sugar. After boiling fifteen minutes, add four tablespoonfuls

Kingsford's corn starch, stirring all the time. When cold, pour

over four or five pealed and sliced oranges. Over the top spread

whites of three eggs, sweetened.

LILLIAN M. ARMSTRONG.

Apfel Charlotte.

Line a granite pudding dish with a rich, puff paste, greas-

ing it well before you do so. Chop up some apples quite fine,

put on the crust, also some raisins (seeded), sugar and cinna-

mon, then put another layer of paste and another layer of chopped

apples, and so on until filled, making about three layers, the last

being crust. Bake slowly and long to a nice dark brown. When

baked turn the dish over on your plate and pudding will come

out whole.

MRS. J. G. ROSENTHAL.

Baked Apples.

Take one dozen medium-sized apples. Pare and core, leav-

ing whole. About two hours before baking put a small table-

spoonful of tapioca to soak in just enough water to cover.

Place apples in a pan, which has first been buttered to prevent

sticking, then fill inside of apples with a little sugar and flour

mixed, sprinkling the tops with flour first, then sugar. Now

add water enough to tapioca to make nearly a cupful, and spread

evenly over all; cinnamon can be used if desired. Bake in hot

oven, covering until apples are tender, then remove cover and

let bake until a light brown, a dry apple would require a little

water to be added while baking.

MRS. S. E. ARMSTRONG.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 56)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 56)

Description

[page 56]

[corresponds to page 51 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 51

Steam Pudding.

3 well-beaten eggs,

2/3 cupful sweet milk,

2 tablespoonfuls sugar,

1 tablespoonful butter,

1 tablespoonful Cleveland's baking powder.,

Raisins chopped fine; flour to make consistency of cake;

fresh fruit or canned fruit of any kind may be used; the liquid

poured off, as it would thin the batter; raspberries preferred;

steam fifty minutes.

SAUCE.--Butter, sugar, and one teaspoonful flour stirred to

a cream, pour over it boiling water and cook a little while.

MAUD KRAEMER.

Rice Pudding Without Eggs.

One-half cupful rice in two quarts of milk; sugar and nut-

meg to taste. Bake slowly two hours.

Steamed Pudding.

2 cupfuls whole wheat flour, or brown

1 cupful stoned raisins,

1/2 teaspoonful soda,

6 cupfuls sweet milk,

1/2 cupful molasses,

1/2 teaspoonful salt,

Steam two-and-a-half hours and serve with cream sauce.

PUDDING SAUCE.--One cupful sugar, two teaspoonfuls

Kingsford's cornstarch mixed dry with the sugar, add a little

salt and pour over one pint boiling water. Slice in half a lemon,

or add other flavoring to suit taste.

MISS FLORENCE DEAVER.

Cottage Pudding.

1 cupful sugar,

1 cupful sweet milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

2 heaping teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder,

2 eggs,

1/2 cupful butter,

1/2 cupful raisins.

SAUCE.

1 cupful sugar,

1 teaspoonful vanilla or lemon,

3 tablespoonfuls butter,

1 pint boiling water,

3 heaping teaspoonfuls Kingford's cornstarch.

Stir ingredients well and cook till clear.

MRS. H. T. MAIN.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 57)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 57)

Description

[page 57]

[corresponds to page 52 of Delaware Cook Book]

52 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Cottage Pudding.

1 egg, salt,

1 1/2 cupfuls flour,

1 cupful sweet milk,

1 heaped teaspoonful butter,

2 small teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder.

Steam three-fourths hour.

SAUCE FOR COTTAGE PUDDING.

1 cup sugar,

1 tablespoonful water,

1/4 cupful soft butter,

1 cupful fresh strawberries.

Mix to a cream, butter, sugar and water, then stir in the

fruit thoroughly. In winter plum, or other jams may be used.

Cornmeal Pudding.

3 tablespoonfuls rounded, Akron meal

1 pint milk,

1 heaping teaspoonful butter,

1 egg,

Wet meal with four tablespoonfuls cold water, and add to it

one pint boiling water; cook two minutes briskly; add butter

and a little salt. Pour into a pudding dish with the cold milk;

sweeten to taste. When cool add egg well beaten. Bake

slowly one-and-a-half hours.

MRS. FRANCIS P. JUDD.

Cornmeal Pudding.

Bring one pint sweet milk to a boil, and slowly stir in a cup-

ful of cornmeal. Remove from fire, and add a cupful of sugar,

a little salt. Cool this with one pint cold milk, and add two or

three eggs beaten up, then add one quart more milk. Bake

from two to three hours.

MISS CARRIE ROBERTS.

Delicious Chocolate Pudding.

Put two cupfuls stale bread crumbs, finely crumbed, into a

well greased mould. Put one pint milk over the fire in double

kettle. Beat three eggs with one cupful sugar, till light, add

this to the hot milk; stir over the fire till it thickens, then re-

move, add two ounces grated chocolate. Pour this while hot

over the bread crumbs, and when cool stir in a cup of cream,

whipped perfectly stiff and flavor with one teaspoonfulful

vanilla. Serve very cold.

MRS. NANCY R. WATSON.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 58)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 58)

Description

[page 58]

[corresponds to page 53 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 53

Pudding.

Beat two eggs, one cup sugar, one tablespoonful butter to a

froth, add one cupful milk, then gradually two cupfuls flour in

which has been sifted on teaspoonful soda, two teaspoonfuls

cream tartar. Bake. Serve with sour or whipped cream.

MRS. W. H. DUCKWORTH.

Orange Pudding.

Two large oranges sliced and covered with one teacupful

sugar; heat one pint milk; stir into the boiling milk, one egg,

one tablespoonful Kingsford's corn starch, one tablespoonful

sugar beaten together. When cooked pour over the oranges.

Let it stand till next day before eating.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

A Rich Prune Pudding.

1 cup cooked prunes,

1/2 cup pulverized sugar,

Whites of four eggs, beaten,

1/2 teaspoonful cream tartar.

Flavor with vanilla; bake fifteen minutes. Eat with whip-

ped cream.

MRS. ED GREINER.

Orange Pudding.

Cut up oranges in small pieces to make a thick layer on the

bottom of a pudding dish. Make a thick boiled custard, and

when cool pour over the oranges. Make a meringue of the

whites of the eggs, spread over the top and slightly brown in

the oven.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Date Pudding.

1 cupful sour milk,

1 spoonful butter,

Spices to suit,

1 cupful sugar,

1 teaspoonful soda.

1 pound dates with stones removed.

Stir quite stiff with Graham flour, and steam two hours.

Serve with cream and sugar, or sauce.

MRS. M. B. SHUR,

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 59)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 59)

Description

[page 59]

[corresponds to page 54 of Delaware Cook Book]

54 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Fig Pudding.

1/2 pound figs,

5 tablespoonsful powdered sugar,

2 eggs,

1/2 pint dry bread crumbs,

3 tablespoonfuls butter,

1 cupful milk.

Chop figs fine and mix with butter, and by degrees add

other ingredients; butter and sprinkle; mould with bread

crumbs, pour in pudding, cover closely, and boil three hours.

Serve with lemon sauce.

MRS. GEO. CLARK.

Make a date pudding in the same way, using chopped dates in-

stead of figs.

MRS. LENA BRITTAIN.

Banana Pudding.

1 quart milk,

1/2 cupful sugar,

3 eggs,

2 tablespoonfuls Kingsford's corn-

starch, dissolved in milk.

Boil milk with pinch of salt, and lump butter, then add

eggs and sugar well beaten, and lastly cornstarch. Pour this

over four sliced bananas.

MRS. E. E. HYATT.

Peach Pudding.

1 cupful sweet milk,

2 tablespoonfuls butter,

1 cupful sugar,

1 egg.

One and one-half tablespoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder

sifted in enough flour to make a thick batter. Pour this into a

baking dish, and cover it over thickly with halves of peaches,

either fresh or canned. Bake the pudding in a quick oven, and

eat while hot with following sauce:

1 heaping tablespoonful butter,

1 cupful hot water,

1/2 teaspoonful vanilla,

1 heaping tablespoonful sugar,

1 tablespoonful flour.

Melt the sugar and butter, then add the flour, water and

vanilla; stir it continually until it becomes thick.

MRS. A. KIRK.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 60)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 60)

Description

[page 60]

[corresponds to page 55 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 55

Hard Sauce.

Have in readiness a warm but not hot bowl, and in it place

one cupful powdered sugar, one-fourth cupful butter, one tea-

spoonful vanilla, and beat until well creamed. Arrange the

sauce upon a pretty dish and set in a cool place until required.

This sauce may be used with hot pudding of any kind.

MRS. DR. NEIL.

Fresh Peach Meringue Pudding.

Little more than one pint milk, yolks of two eggs, two

scant dessert spoonfuls Kingsford's cornstarch, small lump but-

ter, not quite one-half cupful granulated sugar. Cut ripe peaches,

put two layers in pudding dish. Sprinkle each layer with sugar.

Make a custard of the milk, cornstarch, butter, yolks and sugar,

and one teaspoonful vanilla. Boil until it thickens. Pour care-

fully over the peaches. Bake twenty minutes in a quick oven.

When done spread the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth

with two tablespoonfuls sugar on top and brown. Serve with

cream.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

Apple Pudding.

Fill a baking dish with apples or any fruit. Into a pint of

milk, sour or sweet, stir a little salt, and flour enough to make a

stiff batter. Pour it over fruit. Bake. Serve with cream or

sauce.

MRS. M. A. MITCHELL.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 61)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 61)

Description

[page 61]

[corresponds to page 56 of Delaware Cook Book]

56 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

PIES.

Plain Pie Crust.

Three cupfuls flour, one cupful shortening rubbed well

through the flour; wet with cold water. Mould it as little as

possible. This makes crust for two pies.

MRS. BARBARA JOHNSON.

Mince Meat.

5 lbs. meat,

1 lb. suet,

1 gal. fine chopped apples,

1 qt. boiled cider,

1 qt. granulated sugar,

1 lb. dried currants,

1 lb. seedless raisins,

1 oz. oil of cinnamon,

1 preserved lemon,

1 preserved orange,

Citron, the same amount,

Slice the lemon, orange and citron into thin slices. Over

this pour hot water and let stand till tender. Then mix with

the other ingredients. Mix thoroughly. Seal and let stand two

weeks.

MRS. R. M. THOMAS.

Mince Meat.

Two quarts apples, one quart beef, two ounces suet or but-

ter, all chopped fine.

1 teaspoonful salt,

2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful nutmeg,

1 " cloves,

1 cupful boiled cider,

1 cupful stock in which beef was

boiled,

1 pint raisins seeded and cut in

halves,

3 cupfuls sugar,

MRS. BARBARA JOHNSON.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 62)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 62)

Description

[page 62]

[corresponds to page 57 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 57

Dried Apple Pie.

One pound dried apples, one cupful sugar, cinnamon and

nutmeg to taste. Line four medium-sized tins. Cook apples

thoroughly, and after cooling mash with hand, taking out all

hard pieces. Add sugar, spices, and enough water to make the

four pies. Bake with top cover.

MRS. MARY H. SEEDS.

Mock Pineapple Pie.

1 cupful stewed apples,

1 egg,

1 tablespoonful, heaped, sifted flour,

1/2 cupful granulated sugar,

1 tablespoonful vinegar,

Beat yolk of egg, add apple, flour, sugar, and vinegar, and

if apple is not very tart a little more vinegar or lemon juice.

Bake with one crust. When quite cool add meringue of white

of egg and one tablespoonful sugar. Brown or set in a very

moderate oven or it will fall. Flavor pie and meringue with

pineapple.

MRS. FRANCES P. JUDD.

Apple Custard Pie.

Pare, core, slice into eighths, medium-sized apples. Place

these in single layer over the paste. Make a custard as for ordi-

nary custard pie and pour over the apples with bits of butter.

Flavor to taste. Bake without upper crust.

MRS. C. F. GRAFF.

Lemon Pie.

One pint milk or water, yolks of two eggs, scant one-half

cupful flour, mixed with milk or water, one cupful sugar, one

tablespoonful butter. Stir in one grated lemon. Bake in good

crust. This makes two pies. Beat the whites of two eggs with

two tablespoonfuls sugar for the top. Brown in the oven.

MRS. E. T. ARTHUR.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 63)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 63)

Description

[page 63]

[corresponds to page 58 of Delaware Cook Book]

58 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Lemon Pie.

One tablespoonful cornstarch dissolved in a little cold water,

then add one-half pint boiling water and piece of butter size of

a walnut, two eggs, (reserving the white of one for top of pie),

three tablespoonfuls sugar, juice and part of rind of one lemon.

MRS. ELLA M. SMITH.

Lemon Custard Pie.

One large cupful sugar, three (medium) tablespoonfuls flour,

two lemons, yolks of two eggs, whites of four eggs, two pints

boiling water. Line three medium-sized tins. Mix well the

sugar and flour, and stir while adding boiling water. This will

produce a thick paste, to which add the juice and grated rind of

lemons, also egg yolks. This should fill the tins about as full

as an ordinary custard pie. When almost done take from oven

and spread over tops whites of eggs. Add three teaspoonfuls

sugar to eggs while whipping. Use same day.

MISS MABEL SEEDS.

Lemon Pie.

2 lemons (if small),

1 cupful sugar,

1 tablespoonful Kingsford's cornstarch,

3 eggs,

Butter the size of an egg,

1 cupful water.

Put sugar, water, butter, juice of two lemons, and grated

rind of one in a saucepan. Place on the stove until it boils.

Wet the starch in a little cold milk and thicken the above with

it. Just before removing from the stove add the beaten yolks

of the three eggs. The crust must be baked before filling and

the beaten whites used for top of pie. Lastly, put in oven to

lightly brown the whites of eggs.

MRS. SADIE MOYER CHATTERTON.

Cream Pie.

Line a pie tin with paste as for custard pie. To the whites

of two eggs add two tablespoonfuls of stugar and one pint sweet

cream. Bake till set.

MRS. KRAEMER.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and cent 15 Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 64)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 64)

Description

[page 64]

[corresponds to page 59 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 59

Cream Pie.

Place one pint milk in a kettle of water until hot (not boil-

ing); add one cupful white sugar, one-half cupful flour and two

eggs well beaten. Stir rapidly until thoroughly cooked. Fla-

vor with vanilla. Pour over crust which has been previously

baked. Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, and add

three tablespoonfuls powdered sugar. Pour over the custard

and put in the oven until a light brown. To be eaten cold.

MRS. V. R. DUCKWORTH.

Cream Pie.

Beat the whites of three eggs; add two tablespoonfuls of

flour; a teacupful of sugar and a pint of cream; flavor with

extract of lemon; pour into pans lined with rich crust and bake.

MRS. H. T. MAIN.

Apple Cream Pie.

This has but one crust which should not be rolled too thin.

First mix well together one tablepsoonful each of sugar and

flour, and spread evenly over the bottom of the crust, then fill

in with thin slices of tart apples. Season with cinnamon or

nutmeg, add another spoonful flour and plenty of sugar, then

fill up with rich cream just beginning to sour, about one-half tea-

cupful being required. Bake well, and eat before fairly cold, or

else put in oven and warm before eating. Milk and cream

mixed may be used, but the thick cream makes the richest pie.

MISS CYNTHIA SMITH.

Pumpkin Pie.

2 eggs,

1/2 cupful sugar,

1 cupful pumpkin,

1/2 pint milk.

One-half teaspoonful ginger, salt, a small piece of butter.

This makes one pie.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 65)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 65)

Description

[page 65]

[corresponds to page 60 of Delaware Cook Book]

60 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Peach Pie.

Line a pieplate with a rich pie crust, cover thickly with

peaches that have been pared and sliced fine, (canned peaches

may be used when others are not to be had), adding sugar;

cover with strips of dough and bake quickly. If you do not

mind the expense, spread over the peaches a meringue made by

whipping the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth, sweetening

with a tablespoonful of pulverized sugar, for each egg; flavor

with vanilla; set back in the oven until the meringue begins to

color. Take out carefully. Eat cold. Delicious served with

cream.

MRS. J. G. ROSENTHAL.

Buttermilk Pie.

1 cupful sugar,

2 cupfuls buttermilk,

Nutmeg to taste,

Yolks of 3 eggs,

1 tablespoonful of flour,

1 tablespoonful butter.

Whites of eggs for frosting.

This makes two pies.

MRS. KATHARINE BARGE.

PRESERVALENE

WILL KEEP

Milk and Cream Sweet and Fresh

in any kind of weather, and

Preserve Butter and Eggs for One Year.

SOLD BY

PRESERVALENE MANUFACTURING COMPANY,

NEW YORK.

F. M. LOADER, AGENT. DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 66)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 66)

Description

[page 66]

[corresponds to page 61 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 61

CAKES.

A labor-saving way of making cake is to measure out the

sugar, flour and baking powder that the recipe calls for, and sift

all together several times. Beat the required number of eggs,

soften the butter, but do not melt it, add the milk and flavoring,

stir in the above mixture and beat five minutes. Place the loaf

in a well heated oven and bake until done. When cut you will

find a fine-grained, light, delicious cake, with half the usual

labor.

White Cake. No. 1.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

3 cupfuls flour,

Whites of 4 eggs,

1 cupful milk,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

2 teaspoonfuls lemon, orange or va-

nilla.

Bake in square pan and cut in squares. Chocolate icing for

same: two cupfuls granulated sugar; cover with hot water and

boil until it will harden in cold water. Pour over the whites of

two eggs, beaten stiff, and beat; add two squares of Baker's

chocolate grated, and continue beating until cool enough to

spread on the cake.

MRS. D. C. THOMAS

White Cake. No. 2.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

2 1/2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 4 eggs.

MRS. JENNIE STANLEY.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 67)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 67)

Description

[page 67]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 62 of Delaware Cook Book]

AN OPEN LETTER.

To Messrs Baker & Cook:

It is a fact that SOUDERS'

10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla

Extracts are positively better than many

other brands sold at double the price.

They are fine, rich flavors

at low prices, and the

delight of Bakers and

Cooks.

Try Souders' Extracts,

get a good flavor and

save money. They are

sold on a guarantee by

Your Friends,

The Grocers.

Made only by

THE ROYAL REMEDY & EXTRACT CO.,

DAYTON, OHIO.

[image of vanilla with label: SOUDERS' ELEGANT FLAVORING

EXTRACTS REGULAR VANILLA PREPARED Only by the ROYAL

REMEDY & EXTRACT DAYTON.O.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 68)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 68)

Description

[page 68]

[corresponds to page 63 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 63

Snowdrift Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 5 eggs,

Lemon or vanilla.

MRS. HENRY BEVAN.

Watermelon Cake.

WHITE PART.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful milk,

3 1/2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar,

1 teaspoonful soda,

Whites of 8 eggs,

RED PART.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 cupful red sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

2 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful cream of tartar,

1/2 teaspoonful soda,

Whites of 4 eggs,

1 cupful raisins.

Dissolve soda in a little warm water; sift cream tartar in

the flour. Bake in large pan with tube in center, putting red

part around the tube, white outside. Best to have two persons

fill in, one the red, the other the white, going round the tube till

full.

MRS. MAGGIE ZIMMERMAN.

Lemon Cake--Yellow Icing.

1/2 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar well sifted,

3/4 cupfuls milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder sifted 5 times with flour,

Whites of 6 eggs well beaten.

Cream butter and sugar, add whites of eggs, then milk and

flour alternately, (part of one and part of another), until all is

added. Bake in three layers.

FOR FILLING.--Cook in a double boiler; one cupful sugar,

butter size of walnut, yolks of three eggs, and grated rind of

one large or two small lemons, saving out the juice; when

nearly done, or thick, add juice. For icing top and sides, use

remaining yolks of three eggs thickened with sugar, beaten

same as white icing.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 69)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 69)

Description

[page 69]

[corresponds to page 64 of Delaware Cook Book]

64 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Brown Stone Front.

CHOCOLATE MIXTURE.

3/4 cupful chocolate or 1/2 cupful best

cocoa,

3/4 cupful brown sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

1 teaspoonful vanilla,

Yolk of one egg,

CAKE MIXTURE.

1/3 cupful butter,

1 cupful brown sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

2 eggs,

2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar,

1 teaspoonful soda.

Boil chocolate mixture to a cream and cool. Granu-

lated sugar may be used in both mixtures instead of brown

sugar, in which case omit two tablespoonfuls of flour, and

add two of corn starch. Stir cake mixture, then add chcolate

mixture and beat thoroughly. Bake in three layers, using

buttered paper in bottom of baking tins, and put together with

white frosting.

MISS CYNTHIA SMITH.

Blackberry Jam Cake.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

3 eggs,

2 cupfuls flour,

1 cupful jam (blackberry or raspberry)

3 tablespoonfuls sour cream

1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in cream

1 teaspoonful nutmeg,

1 teaspoonful cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful cloves.

Bake in two layers, and put together with icing.

MISS FLO. B. ARMSTRONG.

Spice Cake.

1 cupful brown sugar,

1 cupful maple molasses,

3 eggs, yolks and whites beaten sep-

arately,

1 cupful sour milk,

3 1/2 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful soda, in the milk,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder, in the flour.

MRS. J. A. CLINGAN.

Spice Cake.

1 cupful brown sugar,

1 cupful maple molasses,

3 eggs, yolks and whites beaten sep-

arately,

1 cupful sour milk,

3 1/2 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful soda, in the milk,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder, in the flour.

MRS J. A. CLINGAN.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 70)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 70)

Description

[page 70]

[corresponds to page 65 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 65

Chocolate Caramel Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls granulated sugar,

1 cupful milk or water,

3 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 4 eggs.

Bake in layers.

FILLING.--Whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one

and one-fourth pounds XXXX sugar added gradually; flavor to

taste. Spread on layers and allow to stand until cold. Melt two

squares Baker's chocolate in a small dish, over the teakettle, and

spread over layers.

MRS. CHRISTIAN RIDDLE.

Chocolate Cake.

1/2 cake Baker's chocolate, grated,

1 cupful sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

Yolk of 1 egg.

Cook until well dissolved; let it cool while mixing the cake,

then flavor with vanilla.

CAKE MIXTURE.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 cupful sugar,

2 eggs.

1/2 cupful milk,

2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Add the chocolate mixture and bake in layers. For icing,

boil one cup granulated sugar, and one fourth cup water until it

ropes; pour over the white of one egg, beaten stiff; beat until

cool; flavor with vanilla and spread between the layers.

MRS. DR. NEIL.

Chocolate Cake.

Whites of 3 eggs,

2 cups sugar,

2 large tablespoonfuls butter,

1 cupful milk,

3 cups flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

Bake half of batter in two pans; to the remainder add one-

half cup grated chocolate and bake in two pans. Put together

with icing, arranging light and dark in alternate layers.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Delaware Cook Book (p. 71)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 71)

Description

[page 71]

[corresponds to page 66 of Delaware Cook Book]

66 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Chocolate Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cupful milk (scant),

2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

1 teaspoonful vanilla,

Whites of four eggs.

Bake in layers. For filling, one cup sugar and seven table-

spoonfuls water, boiled together five minutes. Pour over the

white of an egg, beaten stiff; beat until cold, then add two

tablespoonfuls melted chocolate, and spread.

MISS ANNA CLINGAN.

Chocolate Cream Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls granulated sugar,

3 cupfuls flour,

1 cupful milk,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of three eggs.

Bake in layers. For filling, beat whites of three eggs to a

stiff froth, add enough XXXX pulverized sugar to make a stiff

cream; spread on layers and cool. Melt eight tablespoonfuls

Baker's chocolate and spread over layers.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

Chocolate Cake.

2 cupfuls butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

2/3 cupful milk (scant),

1/2 cupful Kingsford's cornstarch,

2 1/2 cupfuls flour, sifted with

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of six eggs.

Bake in layers. For the chocolate icing take one and one-

half cupfuls milk, one cupful sugar, a small piece of butter and

nearly a bar of sweet chocolate. Cook until thick enough to

spread, stirring all the time.

MRS. A. KIRK.

Cocoanut Cake.

1 cupful sugar,

1/3 cupful butter,

Whites of 3 eggs,

1 1/2 cupfuls sweet milk,

1/2 cupful flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Bake in layers. Put together with icing, upon which spread

one grated cocoanut, covering the top and sides thickly with the

same.

MISS CARRIE BARGE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 72)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 72)

Description

[page 72]

[corresponds to page 67 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 67

Ribbon Cake.

1 cupful butter,

2 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

4 eggs,

1 cupful milk,

4 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful cream of tartar,

1/2 teaspoonful soda,

Reserve half the mixture and add to it

1 cupful raisins,

1 cupful currants,

1/4 pound citron,

2 tablespoonfuls molasses,

Cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg to

taste.

Roll fruit in flour. Bake in layers. Put together with

icing.

MRS. W. W. WILLIAMS.

Roll Jelly Cake.

3 eggs, yolks and whites beaten sep-

arately,

1 cupful pulverized sugar,

3 tablespoonfuls milk,

1 1/2 cupful flour,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder.

Bake in dripping pan. Put cake on damp towel when taken

from oven. Spread with jelly and roll.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Cold Water Sponge Cake.

4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten sepa-

rately,

1 3/4 cupfuls sugar, rolled fine,

1/2 cupful cold water,

2 cupfuls flour.

Add whites last, stirring in lightly.

MRS. M. E. CALHOUN.

Bride's Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful cold water,

2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar,

1 teaspoonful soda,

Flavor with almond or to taste,

Whites of five eggs.

MRS. W. W. WILLIAMS.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 73)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 73)

Description

[page 73]

[corresponds to page 68 of Delaware Cook Book]

68 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Minnehaha Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

2/3 cupful milk,

2 large cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 6 eggs, or

3 whole eggs.

Bake in layers. For filling take one large cupful sugar and

a little water boiled until brittle when dropped in cold water.

Stir quickly into the well beaten whites of two eggs; add one

cupful raisins, stoned and chopped fine, or one cupful chopped

hickorynuts. Spread between layers and over top.

MRS. E. F. ARTHUR.

Fig Cake.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

Whites of 7 eggs,

1 cupful milk,

3 1/2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

Bake in layers. For filling chop one pound figs and cook

until soft with one cupful water and one-half cupful sugar.

MRS. E. E. HYATT.

Cassuth Cake.

1/2 cupful butter (scant),

1 cupful brown sugar,

1/2 cupful molasses,

1 cupful milk,

2 1/2 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful soda,

1 cupful chopped raisins and nuts

(hickory or almond),

1/2 nutmeg,

1/2 teaspoonful cloves,

1/2 teaspoonful cinnamon.

MRS. M. B. SHUR.

Sunshine Cake.

1 cupful powdered sugar,

Whites of 7 eggs,

Yolks of 5 eggs,

1 cupful flour (scant),

1/2 teasponful cream of tartar,

Salt,

Orange flavoring.

Bake fifty minutes. MRS. J. MARKEL.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 74)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 74)

Description

[page 74]

[corresponds to page 69 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 69

Angel Food.

1 1/4 cupfuls granulated sugar,

1 cupful flour,

Whites of 9 large or 10 small eggs,

1/2 teaspoonful cream of tartar.

Sift flour and sugar together six times. Beat eggs very

light. When half beaten sprinkle in a pinch of salt, the cream

of tartar and a teaspoonful of vanilla. Lastly stir in very light-

ly the sugar and flour. Put in ungreased pan. Bake forty min-

utes. When taken from oven turn the pan upside down till

the cake is cool.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Devil's Food.

FIRST PART.

1 cupful brown sugar,

1 cupful butter,

1/2 cupful sour milk,

2 cupfuls flour,

2 eggs,

1 teaspoonful soda in the flour,

SECOND PART.

1 cupful brown sugar,

1 cupful chocolate,

1/2 cupful milk put on stove to dis-

solve--not boil; cool and stir

into the first part,

Bake in layers.

FILLING.

2 cupfuls brown sugar,

1/2 cupful sweet milk,

1/2 cupful butter.

Melt together, cool, and put between the layers.

MRS. GEO. CLARK.

Loaf Cake.

3/4 cupfuls butter,

2 cupfuls pulverized sugar,

1 cupful milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

3 scant teaspoonfuls Cleveland's bak-

ing powder,

Whites of 6 eggs,

MRS. EUGENE POLLOCK.

A Good Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

2 cupfuls flour,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder,

1/2 teaspoonful vanilla,

Whites of 4 eggs.

MISS JENNIE BOWDLE.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 75)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 75)

Description

[page 75]

[corresponds to page 70 of Delaware Cook Book]

70 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Sponge Cake.

6 eggs,

1 cup powdered sugar,

2 cupfuls flour, sifted twice.

Beat eggs and sugar three-quarters of an hour, add flour

with as little stirring as possible, and bake in a moderate oven

half an hour.

MISS JOE ANDERSON.

Corn Starch Cake.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful milk,

1 cupful Kingsford's corn starch,

2 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 6 eggs,

MRS. E. E. HYATT.

Coffee Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1/2 cupful lard,

2 cupfuls sugar,

3 eggs, reserving whites of 2 for icing,

1 cupful strong coffee,

1 1/2 cupful chopped raisins,

1 teaspoonful cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful cloves,

1 teaspoonful nutmeg,

1 teaspoonful soda.

Dissolve soda in coffee; flour to thicken. Bake in layers.

MRS. E. M. ARCHER.

Orange Cake.

Yolks of 5 eggs and whites of 4,

beaten separately,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cupful water,

2 cupful flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Juice and grated rind of two oranges,

A little salt.

Bake in layers. For filling, take the juice and rind of two

oranges, one-half cupful sugar, one and one-half teaspoonful

gelatine; boil ten minutes; spread between layers and cover the

whole with frosting.

MISS LIZZIE EDWARDS.

Raisin Cake.

1 cupful sugar,

1 egg,

3/4 cupful water,

3 tablespoonfuls butter,

2 1/2 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

1 cupful raisins, seeded.

MRS. BEVAN.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 76)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 76)

Description

[page 76]

[corresponds to page 71 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 71

Simple Sponge Cake.

3 eggs,

1 cupful powdered sugar,

1 cupful flour,

1 tablespoonful water,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder,

1 teaspoonful vanilla or lemon.

Bake twenty minutes in a quick oven.

MRS. J. A. MARKEL.

Custard Cake.

3 eggs,

1 cupful sugar,

4 tablespoonfuls milk,

1 1/2 cupfuls flour,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

Bake in layers.

CUSTARD FILLING.--Cook together one cupful milk, one-

half cupful sugar, one egg well beaten, butter size of walnut,

and Kingsford's cornstarch to thicken. Flavor and spread be-

tween the layers.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Almond Custard Cake.

Whites of 10 eggs,

1 cupful butter,

2 1/2 cupfuls pulverized sugar,

3/4 cupful milk,

4 cupfuls sifted flour,

4 small teaspoonfuls Cleveland's bak-

ing powder.

FILLING.--One cupful blanched almonds chopped, one cup-

ful pulverized sugar, one cupful sour whipped cream flavored

with vanilla and almond.

ORDER OF EXERCISES.--First cream the butter, then add

sugar little by little, then add eggs and flour alternately, the

eggs having been beaten stiff, and flour and baking powder

sifted together. Lastly, add the flavoring.

MRS. A. J. HAZLETT.

Bread Cake.

1/2 lb. butter,

1 lb. sugar,

2 lbs. light bread dough,

4 eggs,

1 cupful raisins,

1 cupful English currants,

1 cupful dates,

Cinnamon.

1 teaspoonful soda. (See table weights and measures, page 7).

Bake at once in a slow oven.

MRS. A. BISHOP.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.

Delaware Cook Book (p. 77)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 77)

Description

[page 77]

[corresponds to page 72 of Delaware Cook Book]

72 DELAWARE COOK BOOK

Queen Cake.

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cup milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

2 tablespoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 7 eggs,

1 cupful citron, chopped fine,

1/2 pound chopped almonds,

1 cupful cocoanut,

Add fruit last.

Bake in a moderate oven.

MRS. DR. NEIL.

Cincinnati or Pork Cake.

1 lb. pork (free from lean or rind),

chopped fine,

2 cupfuls boiling water or coffee,

(coffee is best), pour over it

and let cool,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful molasses,

7 cupfuls flour,

1 large teaspoonful soda,

1 teaspoonful cloves and cinnamon,

2 lbs. raisins,

1/4 lb. citron.

Bake two and one-half hours.

MRS. W. W. WILLIAMS.

Fruit Cake.

1 lb. butter,

1 lb. powdered sugar,

12 eggs,

1 lb. browned flour,

1 lb. raisins,

1/2 lb. citron and lemon peel,

2 teaspoonfuls mixed spices, (cloves,

allspice and cinnamon),

1 grated nutmeg,

1 lb. currants. (See tables of weights and measures, page 7).

Brown the flour and let it cool before using. Mix sugar

and butter to a cream, add beaten yolks of eggs, then fruit and

spices which have been mixed with the brown flour. Bake

three hours and let it remain in the oven until the oven is cold.

It will keep for months.

MRS. J. M. ARMSTRONG.

Good Eggless Cake.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful sour milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

1 small teaspoonful soda,

1 cupful chopped raisins, cinnamon

and nutmeg,

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 78)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 78)

Description

[page 78]

[corresponds to page 73 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK 73

Thanksgiving Fruit Cake.

1 cupful butter, soft,

1 pound black sugar,

1 cupful N. O. molasses,

1 cupful strong coffee,

4 eggs, yolks and whites beaten sep-

arately,

1 pound raisins,

1 pound currants,

1/4 pound citron,

1 tablespoonful spice,

Alum size of kernel of corn, dissolved

in hot water.

One teaspoonful soda, added the last thing before the flour;

add flour, not too stiff, and bake slowly. Put in a cool oven and

let the cake and oven heat together.

MRS. ARNOLD O. BROWN.

Fig Cake.

WHITE.

2/3 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

2/3 cupful milk,

3 cupfuls flour,

3 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

Whites of 8 eggs,

Bake in two pans.

GOLD.

1/2 cupful butter,

1 cupful sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

1 1/2 cupfuls flour,

1 1/2 teaspoons Cleveland's baking

powder,

1 teaspoonful allspice,

1 teaspoonful cinnamon,

Yolks of 7 eggs.

Put half the gold part in a pan cover closely with halved

figs, sifted with flour, then put in the rest of the yellow dough.

When baked, place the gold cake between the two whites, with

icing between the layers and on top.

MRS. HORTENSE CAMP LEE.

Filbert or Hazelnut Tart.

1 pound nuts,

14 stale lady fingers,

10 eggs,

1 1/2 pounds granulated sugar,

1 lemon.

Crack nuts, and grate or powder the kernels; powder lady

fingers with a rolling-pin; beat yolks of eggs and sugar to a

cream; add powdered nuts, setting aside a handful of the

coarser pieces for us on the layers. Add grated lemon peel

and juice and the powdered lady fingers; beat well together,

then add slowly the beaten whites of the eggs. Bake slowly in

two jelly pans. Moisten confectioner's sugar with a little water

and spread over the layers, sprinkling the coarser grated ker-

nels between and on top of the layers.

MRS. MORK.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 79)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 79)

Description

[page 79]

[corresponds to page 74 of Delaware Cook Book]

74 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Kaughie Keighk.

JEST FER PHUNN.

1 kupful kold watter,

1 kupful butter,

1 kupful shuger,

1 kupful merlassis,

3 kupfuls phloughr,

3 aiggs,

2 tablespunefuls sinamon,

1 tablespunefuls awlspys,

1 tabelspuneful kloavs,

1 teespuneful psowda,

2 teespunefuls vinnegur,

1 pownd wrayzines.

Cora's Cake.

1/2 cupful butter (scant),

1 large cupful sugar,

1/2 cupful water,

2 large cups flour,

2 teaspoons Cleveland's baking

powder,

1 teaspoonful vanilla or lemon.

Whites of 5 eggs.

Bake in layers.

FILLING--CHOCOLATE CARAMEL.

2 1/2 cupfuls brown sugar,

1/2 cupful milk,

2 tablespoonfuls water,

1 tablespoonful flour,

1 teaspoonful butter.

Boil five minutes; add nearly one-half cake grated choco-

late. Cook to the consistency of jelly; add a pinch of soda, and

when cool, one teaspoonful vanilla. Spread between layers, on

top and sides of cake.

OR, CREAM CARAMEL.

1 cupful white sugar,

1 cup brown sugar,

Water to moisten,

1 teaspoonful butter.

Boil until it will harden in cold water; add one cup cream

and cook until thick. Flavor with one teaspoonful vanilla.

MRS. GEO. D. LOWREY.

Almond Icing.

Whites of four eggs, one pound powdered sugar, one pound

sweet almonds. Blanch the almonds by pouring boiling water

over them. When dry, pound them to a paste and put into the

icing.

MRS. LOUISE REYNOLDS.

Soft Frosting.

2 cupfuls granulated sugar,

1/4 cupful water,

5 tablespoonfuls thick cream,

1 tablespoonful butter,

Boil sugar and water until it will harden in cold water; take

from the stove, add butter and cream, and stir briskly until cool.

Cake can be cut immediately, if desired.

MISS L. BELLE MOYER.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 80)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 80)

Description

[page 80]

[corresponds to page 75 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 75

GINGER BREADS AND COOKIES.

Gingerbread.

1 cupful butter,

1 cupful N. O. molasses,

1 cupful sour milk,

2 cupfuls light brown sugar,

4 1/2 cupfuls flour,

3 eggs,

1 teaspoonful soda,

1 teaspoonful ginger.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

Mother's Gingerbread.

One teacupful molasses, one-half cupful butter; fill up the

cup with hot water; add one tablespoonful ginger, and dissolve

one teaspoonful soda in the water. (To dissolve a little alum

and add to the molasses will improve it.) Flour enough for a

thin batter.

MRS. W. Z. EVANS.

Fruit Gingerbread.

1 cupful granulated sugar,

1 cupful molasses,

1 level teaspoonful soda,

1 heaping teaspoonful ginger,

1/2 teaspoonful cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder,

2 eggs,

1 cupful raisins,

1 cupful currants,

1 cupful sweet milk,

1/2 cupful butter,

A little salt.

A little more than three cupfuls flour. Beat the soda in the

molasses, and sift the baking powder with the flour.

MRS. PHILA PALMER.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 81)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 81)

Description

[page 81]

[corresponds to page 76 of Delaware Cook Book]

76 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Ginger Cake.

1/2 cupful brown sugar,

1/2 cupful N. O. molasses,

1/2 cupful lard and butter,

1/2 cupful hot water,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder, sifted with flour.

1 teaspoonful ginger,

1 teaspoonful soda,

1 egg,

2 1/2 cupfuls flour.

MRS. A. MOORE.

Soft Gingerbread.

2 eggs,

1 cupful sugar,

1 cupful Orleans molasses,

1/2 cupful butter (small),

1 cupful sour milk,

1 heaping teaspoonful ginger,

1 heaping teaspoonful soda,

MRS. LEEPER.

Ginger Jelly Cake.

1 cupful best Orleans molasses,

1/2 cupful butter,

1/2 cupful buttermilk,

2 eggs,

1 tablespoonful ginger,

1 teaspoonful soda dissolved in mo-

lasses.

Bake in four cakes, and spread with jelly. Icing may be

used, if desired.

MOTHER CARY.

Ginger Cookies.

1 cupful brown sugar,

2 cupfuls molasses,

2/3 cupful sour milk,

2 eggs.

1 cupful lard,

5 teaspoonfuls soda,

3 tablespoonfuls ginger.

Mix part of the soda with the flour. Roll them out as soft

as you can.

MRS. F. HEINRICHS.

Cookies.

4 eggs,

1 cupful butter,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 teaspoonful soda,

2 tablespoonfuls water.

Enough flour to roll. This will make one hundred cookies.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 82)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 82)

Description

[page 82]

[corresponds to page 77 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 77

Ginger Drop Cakes.

These are delicious, and are less trouble than cookies, as

they are not rolled out.

1 cupful molasses,

1/2 cupful butter,

1 cupful sugar,

1/3 cupful boiling water,

2 eggs,

1 teaspoonful ginger,

1/2 teaspoonful cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful salt,

1 teaspoonful soda,

3 heaping cupfuls flour.

Butter large baking pans, and drop small spoonfuls of the

batter at intervals of two inches over the pans. If put too close

they will run together in baking and loose their form.

MISS MAGGIE SIMMONS.

Cookies.

2 eggs,

1 1/2 cupful sugar,

2/3 cupful butter,

3 tablespoons milk,

2 teaspoonfuls lemon extract,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

Mix with flour as soft as can be well rolled out.

MISS JESSIE A. JOHNSON.

Lemon Crackers.

2 beaten eggs,

2 cupfuls sugar,

1 cupful lard,

2 cupfuls sweet milk,

Two tablespoonfuls lemon essence and half of five cents'

worth carbonate ammonia. Mix all together, and add flour to

roll out; cut in squares, pick with a fork, and bake in a quick

oven.

MRS. LOTTIE L. GATES.

Lemon Crackers.

Two and one-half cupfuls pulverized sugar, one pint lard,

whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. One ounce Baker's

ammonia pulverized and put into a pint sweet milk and let soak

twelve hours. Two tablespoonfuls lemon extract. Mix in as

much flour as possible; roll out, and cut with square cutter.

Lay on buttered tins one-half inch apart. Bake in a quick

oven.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 83)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 83)

Description

[page 83]

[corresponds to page 78 of Delaware Cook Book]

78 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Lady Fingers.

2 eggs,

1 cupful sugar,

1/2 cupful butter beaten to a cream,

4 tablespoonfuls sweet milk

Two teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking powder, and enough

flour to stir with spoon; flavor with lemon or vanilla; flour your

moulding board, take a little piece of dough, roll with your

hand as large as your finger, cut off in four-inch lengths, put

closely on buttered tins, and bake in a quick oven.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Fine Sugar Cookies.

Two and one-half cupfuls sugar, one heaping cupful butter

or beef dripping, (one-half lard will do,) one and one-half pints

sour cream and buttermilk, (half and half,) three eggs, one heap-

ing teaspoonful soda, same of cream tartar. If butter is used

no salt is needed; if not, one scant teapoonful salt; flavor to

taste; flour to make a soft dough; roll thin, sprinkle with granu-

lated sugar; cut out and lay in pan so they will not touch.

Bake in quick oven.

MRS. IDA M. WARD.

Pretzels.

Make like bread, but very much stiffer, and roll shape of

pretzels. Let them rise; dip into boiling lye, sprinkle plenty of

salt on them, and bake in a quick oven.

MRS. L. COLLMER.

Hermit Cakes.

1 1/2 cupfuls brown sugar,

1/2 cupful currants,

1/2 cupful butter,

1 teaspoonful soda,

1 teaspoonful nutmeg,

1/2 cupful seeded raisins, chopped fine,

2 eggs,

Salt to taste,

1 teaspoonful cinnamon,

1 teaspoonful cloves,

Dissolve soda in oen tablespoonful sweet milk. Just flour

enough to mould out. Bake in small cakes.

MISS MAME THOMAS.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 84)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 84)

Description

[page 84]

[corresponds to page 79 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 79

Little Sponge Cakes.

3 eggs, beaten separately,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder,

1 cupful of flour,

1 cupful coffee A sugar,

1 tablespoonful cold water.

Flavoring. Bake in gem pans in a quick oven. This

amount will make a dozen in deep pans.

MISS CARRIE M. LEAS.

Graham Cookies.

Break one egg into a cup, beat light; add to it one tea-

spoonful butter, three tablespoonfuls cold water, one-half tea-

spoonful soda previously dissolved in very little warm water.

Fill the cup with brown sugar; turn out into a dish and add two

cups Graham flour, or enough to make a stiff dough. Roll

very thin, using white flour, if needed for the board, and cut

into small cookies, put on greased tins, and bake quickly for

twelve minutes, or until a very delicate brown.

MRS. S. K. DUVALL.

Fried Cakes.

1 cupful sugar,

1 cupful milk,

1 large spoonful butter,

2 eggs,

1/2 nutmeg,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder.

Flour sufficient to roll out. Cut in cakes.

MISS JENNIE WOODWARD.

Doughnuts.

1 1/2 cupfuls sugar,

2 cupfuls buttermilk, (or sour or

sweet milk),

1 teaspoonful soda with sour milk, if

used,

2 1/2 teaspoonfuls baking powder with

the sweet milk,

6 tablespoonfuls melted lard and

butter,

1/2 teaspoonful salt,

3 or 4 eggs, as can be afforded,

Flour to make a very soft dough.

With the hands take a lump of the dough and roll into

balls.

MRS. M. A. MITCHELL.

To give a fine, rich flavor to cakes and pastry use SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and cent 15 Vanilla Extracts, the best in the world for the money.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 85)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 85)

Description

[page 85]

[corresponds to page 80 of Delaware Cook Book]

80 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Doughnuts.

2 cupfuls sugar,

3 eggs,

2 cupfuls sour milk,

1 teaspoonful soda.

A piece of butter half as large as an egg. Flour to make

soft dough.

MISS ANNA GRAY.

Springela.

4 eggs,

1 pound pulverized sugar,

1 teaspoonful anise oil,

5 cents worth anise seed,

2 teaspoonfuls Cleveland's baking

powder,

A little butter and milk.

Beat the yolks of eggs and sugar one hour, then add oil,

seed, butter, milk and baking powder. Put in enough flour to

roll out. Do not roll too thin. Cut in any shape; let them

stand over night, and bake in the morning.

MRS. L. COLLMER.

Hickorynut Cake.

Beat the whites of three eggs light, add one cupful white

sugar, one tablespoonful flour, and 1 1/2 cupfuls hickorynuts chop-

ped fine. Drop on floured tins and bake in a moderate oven.

MRS. HEIKIS.

Hickorynut Macaroons.

2 cupfuls sugar,

2 cupfuls hickorynuts, chopped fine,

Whites of 3 eggs,

1 cupful flour,

2 tablespoonfuls water,

1 teaspoonful Cleveland's baking

powder.

Don't roll out; make stiff enough to drop in pans two inches

apart. Bake in moderate oven.

MISS GRACE E. WOTTRING.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 86)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 86)

Description

[page 86]

[corresponds to page 81 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 81

CANDIES AND CONFECTIONS.

Candy should not be stirred while boiling. Cream of tartar

should not be added until the syrup begins to boil. Butter

should be put in when candy is almost done. Flavors are more

delicate when not boiled in candy, but added afterward.

Unboiled Cream Candy.

Take the white of an egg, an equal quantity of water or

cream, and enough confectioner's sugar to make a firm but not

hard paste. This forms the basis for many kinds of home-made

candies.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Peanut Candy.

Five cents worth of peanuts, one teacupful granulated

sugar. Put the sugar without any water in a hot skillet and

stir constantly till the sugar is melted. Remove from the fire

and pour over the peanuts while there are yet a few fine grains

of sugar in it, or it will have a burnt taste.

MISS FIDELIA PERKINS.

Everton Taffy, With White Sugar.

Put two cupfuls granulated sugar in a saucepan with a cupful

of hot water; beat a half cupful butter to a cream. When the

sugar is dissolved add the butter, and keep stirring the mixture

over the fire until it sets, when a little is poured on a buttered

dish. Just as it is done add six drops of essence of lemon.

Butter a tin, pour on the mixture, one-fourth to one-half inch

thick, and when cool it will easily separate from the dish. Mark

off in squares, if you wish it to break easily.

MISS EVELYN THOMAS.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 87)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 87)

Description

[page 87]

[corresponds to page 82 of Delaware Cook Book]

82 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

HOW TO PLEASE YOUR GUESTS.

ORDER YOUR

Ice Cream,

Fruit,

Ices,

Cakes,

Candy and

Sweet Cream,

ALSO

Tables and Chairs,

FROM

BEACH'S

Wholesale Ice Cream Factory,

70 AND 72 SOUTH SANDUSKY STREET.

TELEPHONE 96. DELAWARE, OHIO.

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 88)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 88)

Description

[page 88]

[corresponds to page 83 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 83

Ice Cream Candy

Two cupfuls granulated sugar, one-third cupful boiling

water and one-third teaspoonful cream of tartar. When the

sugar begins to boil add cream of tartar dissolved in a little boil-

ing water and boil ten minutes; then try by dropping some in

cold water. If it is hard when you strike the cup, add a small

piece of butter and remove from the fire. Flavor while working.

MISS CYNTHIA SMITH.

Fudge.

2 cupfuls sugar,

1/2 cupful water, or milk,

1/2 cupful nuts, (may be omitted),

1/4 cake sweet chocolate, grated,

1 tablespoonful butter,

1 teaspoonful vanilla.

Put sugar, nuts and water together, and when boiling well,

add chocolate and butter. When it becomes crisp--test by

dropping into cold water--remove from fire, flavor and beat

until it stiffins. Pour on buttered plate, and immediately check

off in squares with a sharp knife.

MISS GRACE WINTER.

Butter Scotch.

2 cupfuls sugar,

2 tablespoonfuls water,

Piece of butter size of an egg.

Boil without stirring until it hardens on a spoon. Pour out

on buttered plate to cool.

MRS. W. A. SMITH.

Popcorn Balls.

Dissolve one ounce white gum Arabic in one-half pint of

water. And one pound granulated sugar and boil until, when

a little is cooled in a saucer, it becomes so thick as to be stir-

red with difficulty. Pour the hot liquid over half a bushel of

freshly popped corn, and when well mixed the kernels will ad-

here in a mass; form into balls by pressing with the hands

slightly dusted with flour. If ordinary molasses is used, no

gum Arabic is necessary, but the latter is used for the popcorn

ball of commerce.

MISS DORA WHETSEL.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 89)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 89)

Description

[page 89]

[corresponds to page 84 of Delaware Cook Book]

84 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Cream Puffs.

Yolks of 2 eggs,

1 cupful sugar,

1 teaspoonful soda,

1/2 teaspoonful flavoring,

1 cupful cream,

2 1/2 scant cups flour,

2 teaspoonfuls cream of tartar,

Bake in patty pans, Cut open and take out some of inside

with a fork. Put into each about two tablespoons whipped

cream, sweetened and flavored to taste. The halves are then

closed together and iced all over with boiled icing.

MRS. JESSIE SEMANS.

Meringues.

Whites of four eggs, one coffee cupful granulated sugar.

Beat the eggs longer than when stiff enough to stand alone;

beat in sugar lightly and quickly with a fork. Take nice clean

pasteboard, drop the mixture on it with a teaspoon, leaving a

space of two inches between them. Shape quickly, making

them either round or oblong. Bake in a moderate oven about

twenty minutes. When done a very delicate brown, take from

the board, turn bottom side up, and with a knife carefully press

in the center of each. Make any amount you wish, as they

will keep any length of time. When you wish to serve, they

may be filled with whipped cream, and two halves pressed

together.

MRS. ORIE SHUR.

Macaroons.

Into the beaten whites of four eggs stir one pound confec-

tioner's sugar. When smooth add one pound chopped hickory-

nuts; use cocoanut if desired. Grease a dripping pan with lard

and drop the mixture in lumps about as large as a hickorynut

and a little distance apart. Bake a few minutes or until maca-

roons are nicely raised. Set the pan aside to cool a little before

removing the macaroons.

MRS. BRITTAIN DREMAN.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 90)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 90)

Description

[page 90]

[corresponds to page 85 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 85

Macaroons.

2 cupfuls hickorynuts, chopped fine,

1 cupful sugar,

Rub well together,

1/2 cupful flour,

2 tablespoonfuls water,

1 egg, beaten light,

Add a pinch off baking powder and mix well. Then drop

on buttered dripping pan and bake in a warm (not hot) oven.

MISS MINNIE DUCKWORTH.

Cheese Macaroons.

1 cupful minced cheese,

1 cupful flour,

1/2 cupful butter, scant.

Moisten with milk to a stiff dough. Roll out into thin

sheets. Lay these together; roll, and with sharp knife slice off

pieces one-quarter inch thick. The little cakes should be the

size of a silver dollar. Bake a delicate brown.

MRS. L. E. WINTER.

Plain Ice Cream.

1 quart rich milk,

2 eggs,

1 cupful sugar,

1 heaping teaspoonful Kingsford's

cornstarch.

Heat the milk and when boiling hot stir into it the other

ingredients thoroughly beaten together, and cook five minutes.

Flavor when cool with vanilla.

Ice Cream.

1 quart cream,

1 pint milk,

2 teaspoonfuls vanilla,

4 eggs, beat separate,

1 1/2 cupfuls powdered sugar.

MRS. EUGENE POLLOCK.

Ice Cream.

Three quarts cream, one quart milk, or use equal parts

milk and cream. Take the milk and make a custard, using one-

half tablespoonful Kingsford's cornstarch, yolks three eggs;

then run through a strainer; when cool, add cream and beaten

whites of three eggs and sweeten very sweet.

F. M. B.

We recommend SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts

because they are fine, rich flavors, at half the price of other brands.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 91)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 91)

Description

[page 91]

[corresponds to page 86 of Delaware Cook Book]

86 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Lemon Ice.

One quart water, juice of four lemons, one pound sugar;

strain the mixture, and just before freezing add the beaten

whites of two eggs.

MRS. W. W. DAVIES.

Pineapple Sherbert.

1/2 canful shredded pineapple

2 lemons,

3 cupfuls sugar,

4 cupfuls water.

Boil the sugar and water, and when cool add the pineapple

and juice of lemons. When partly frozen, beat well, and add

the well-beaten whites of two eggs. Freeze until fine and firm.

MRS. L. E. WINTER.

A Nest of Easter Eggs.

Calf's foot or gelatine jelly, blanc mange, preserved lemon

peel and egg shells. Color the jelly a bright yellow, by soaking

dried saffron blossoms in the water; quarter the lemon rinds,

trim all the white out of them, slice in long strips about the

width of a straw, boil in water until tender, throw into a thick

syrup, and boil until clear, then drain on a sieve. Make a good

blanc mange, divide, color one-third pink with flavor or candy

coloring, color one-third green with flavor or candy coloring,

leave one-third white. Take as many eggs as you wish in the

nest, make a hole in the large end of each, pour out the eggs,

wash and drain the shells; set them in a basin of salt to fill,

pour the blanc mange slowly through a funnel to avoid air bub-

bles; set in a cool place to harden. When ready to serve break

up the jelly and pie on a flat round dish. Shape the next by

setting a deep bowl in the middle, and putting the jelly around

it; let stand awhile, if the jelly seems inclined to fall in the

nest. Scatter the lemon strips over the top and sides like

straws; remove egg shells carefully from blanc mange, and fill

the nest wtih them. Nests for one egg can be made by using a

cup instead of a bowl, to mold jelly.

MRS. LUCY PATTON.

Remember, when you make cakes or any pastry, try SOUDERS' 10 cent

Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla. They are high grade goods at low prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 92)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 92)

Description

[page 92]

[corresponds to page 87 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 87

DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

GO TO

J. W. GRIMES,

FOR

Pure Spices, Staple and Fancy Groceries.

NO. 28 WEST WINTER STREET.

30,000 ROLLS of

WALL PAPER!

Consisting of all this season's latest

designs of Ingrains, Cheviots and

Pressed Papers. Damasks, Embossed,

Bronzes, Glimmers, etc., which I will

sell 25 per cent. lower than any hour

in Delaware.

[image of elephant]

GEO. B. ALEXANDER,

DEALER IN

Wall Paper, Paints, Oils, Glass, Varnish, etc.

Lowest Prices in Delaware County.

51 East Winter St., DELAWARE, OHIO.

EDWARD WELCH.

Residence: 72 W. Winter St.

L. WELCH.

Residence: 11 N. Franklin St.

Telephone 3 on 114.

A. A. WELCH'S SONS,

Furniture Dealers and Undertakers,

Nos. 67 and 69 North Sandusky Street, DELAWARE, OHIO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 93)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 93)

Description

[page 93]

[corresponds to page 88 of Delaware Cook Book]

88 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Delicious Fruit Drink.

One pint apple juice (from stewed apples), one teacupful

cranberry juice (berries stewed and juice pressed out as if to

make jelly), juice of two lemons, two oranges and four bananas.

Slice bananas a few hours beforehand; sprinkle sugar on them,

and press out the sweetened juice. Add sufficient water to

make a gallon or five quarts of the mixture, and sweeten to suit

the taste. A few drops of pineapple flavoring should be added

the last thing. Apple and peach juice can be sealed up during

the canning season, and opened as needed.

MARY R. SMITH.

White or Trout Fish, Sweet or Sour.

Salt the fish the day previous; put slices of onion on the

bottom of kettle; lay the fish upon this, adding water to barely

cover; add a piece of fresh butter, a few slices of lemon and a

dash of vinegar; also a few cloves. Let the fish boil uncov-

ered, and in the meantime soak a few ginger snaps in a very

little vinegar; add a handful of raisins, also a handful of pounded

almonds and some ground cinnamon; sweeten with a handful of

brown sugar. By this time your fish will be ready to turn, then

add the sauce and allow the fish to boil a few minutes longer.

Taste; if too sour add more sugar. Take up the fish carefully,

lay on a platter and let the sauce boil until thickened a little,

then pour over the fish. Eat warm or cold.

MRS. J. G. ROSENTHAL.

Connected with the Ladies' Aid Society are:

Sabbath School Teachers,

Public School Teachers,

Culinary Teachers,

these three; but the greatest of these are the culinary teachers.

Tested by MRS. M. WILSON-DRAKE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 94)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 94)

Description

[page 94]

[corresponds to page 89 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 89

HINTS FOR THE SICK ROOM.

Hot, dry wheat bran in a flannel bag is an excellent appli-

cation for lung or other trouble where wet poultices are not con-

venient. Hot salt is always good.

A cup of hot water taken four or five times a day is good

in cases of la grippe. Have the water as hot as can be taken.

A thin pillow of best cotton covered with cheese cloth and

laid over the feather pillow is very restful to the sick. Also, to

have pillows of different sizes for propping the shoulders and

head is desirable.

Gargle for Sore Throat.

One teaspoonful of ammoniated tincture Guaiac in a cupful

of hot milk. Gargle every hour, or every half hour. Keep the

mixture hot. Will cure the worst case of sore throat.

To Allay a Tickling Cough.

One tablespoonful of ginger, two tablespoonfuls sugar, alum

the size of a hazelnut, pulverized. Mix thoroughly and take

one-fourth teaspoonful frequently till relieved.

For a Cough.

One pound of flaxseed, one-half pound rock candy; three

lemons pared and sliced; over this pour two quarts boiling

watear; let it stand till very cold. Strain before drinking.

For cold in the head, ten drops of camphor in a half glass

of water. Take dessertspoonful every twenty minutes.

SOUDERS' 10 cent Lemon and 15 cent Vanilla Extracts are guaranteed

fully equal to many other brands at double the price.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 95)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 95)

Description

[page 95]

[corresponds to page 90 of Delaware Cook Book]

90 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Splendid for Rheumatism.

One ounce origanum, one ounce aqua ammonia, one ounce

laudanum, one-half ounce spirits turpentine; mixed at the drug-

gist's. Three fresh eggs, one pint pure cider vinegar. Beat

the three eggs violently for a long time; the longer the better;

then pour the drugs into the beaten eggs a small stream at a

time, beating hard all the time, then the vinegar in the same

way. This is excellent for a sprain, or stitch in the back, and

for rheumatism that does not swell.

MRS. ELMER HILLS.

Wash for Tired or Weak Eyes.

One teaspoonful pulverized borax, one teaspoonful of salt,

one pint boiling water; let it stand until cool; drain; put in

bottle for use. Better results are obtained by using hot to bathe

the eyes three or four times a day.

INFANTS'

AND

INVALIDS'

FOODS,

ALL KINDS.

STARR'S DRUG STORE.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 96)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 96)

Description

[page 96]

[corresponds to page 91 of Delaware Cook Book]

DELAWARE COOK BOOK. 91

FOOD FOR THE SICK.

To Prepare an Egg.

Beat an egg until very light, add seasoning to the taste, and

then steam until thoroughly warmed through, but not hardened;

this will take about two minutes. An egg prepared in this way

will not distress a sensitive stomach.

Egg Appetizer.

Into one-half glass of milk stir the well beaten white of an

egg; then add juice of cherries or of other fruits for flavoring.

This is nourishing, as well as palatable for the sick.

Cherryade.

Sweeten cherry juice to taste, boil and can. A teaspoon-

ful in a glass of water is very refreshing and allays a cough.

A Dish for Invalids.

One-fourth pound best beefsteak; chop fine; season with

pepper and salt more than for ordinary cooking; add in bits one

teaspoonful butter. Place in a bowl over boiling teakettle; stir

constantly till the blood is just set, which you can tell by its

light color. If kept a moment too long, till the juice starts it

will be hard and dry. It should be just hot, juicy and tender,

and eaten at once.

Cornmeal Gruel.

To one pint boiling water add one tablespoonful of corn-

meal, a pinch of salt, and boil twenty minutes.

Gluten Bread.

Make a stiff dough with flour and water using all the flour

that can be worked in. Put the dough into a quantity of water,

handling it over till all the starch is dissolved out, changing the

water frequently. Salt the dough, by pulling and working in

the salt. Have the oven very hot at first. Break off pieces the

size of a hickorynut, place then a little apart in baking pan and

bake.

MISS HATTIE W. CURTISS.

Delaware Cook Book (p. 97)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 97)

Description

[page 97]

[corresponds to page 92 of Delaware Cook Book]

92 DELAWARE COOK BOOK.

Contents.

Table of Weights and Measures, . . . . 7

Soups, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10

Fish and Meats, . . . . . . . . . 11-17

Vegetables, . . . . . . . . . . . 19-25

Bread and Rolls, . . . . . . . . . 27-29

Muffins and Gems, . . . . . . . . 31-33

Salads and Sauces, . . . . . . . . 35-36

Pickles and Relishes, . . . . . . 37-40

Preserves and Jellies, . . . . . . 41-43

Desserts, . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-47

Puddings and Sauces, . . . . . . . 49-55

Pies, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-60

Cakes, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-74

Ginger Breads and Cookies, . . . . 75-80

Candies and Confections, . . . . . 81-88

Hints for the Sick Room, . . . . . 89-90

Food for the Sick, . . . . . . . . 91
Delaware Cook Book (p. 98)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 98)

Description

[page 98]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 93 of Delaware Cook Book]

THERE

IS

POSITIVELY

NOT

A THING

WORTH HAVING

IN

ANY OTHER

RANGE

WHICH HAS

NOT BEEN

SUCCESSFULLY

EMBODIED

IN THE

Schill Steel Range

MANUFACTURED BY

SCHILL BROTHERS,

CRESTLINE, OHIO.

Made in four and six hole, Nos. 8

and 9, and in every conceiv-

able style.

[image of man pointing]

[image of range]
Delaware Cook Book (p. 99)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 99)

Description

[page 99]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 94 of Delaware Cook Book]

W. B. CAMPBELL'S

South Side Supply Store,

COR. R. R. AND LIBERTY STS.,

DELAWARE, - OHIO.

ALMOST EVERYBODY HAS READ

Dickens' "Old Curiosity Shop," and most people in Delaware

and vicinity have heard of

Smith's Curiosity Shop,

but for particulars give him a call and be convinced that he

merits the reputation of keeping everything--with

the exception of grindstones.

W. H. SMITH, Prop.,

No. 6, South Main St. Opp. City Hall.

DELAWARE, - OHIO.

HOP SING'S LAUNDRY,

20 1/2 South Main Street. 75 North Main Street.

We guarantee you first class laundry work and all done by

hand. We don't wrinkle the bosom.

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, GIVE US A TRIAL.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 100)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 100)

Description

[page 100]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 95 of Delaware Cook Book]

W. W. WILLIAMS,

Livery and Feed Stable,

TELEPHONE 133,

No. 67 North Main Street, DELAWARE, OHIO.

MATHEWS & BRADY,

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in

Refined Oils and Gasoline,

and all Grades of Lubricating Oils and Greases,

86? to 90? Gasoline for gasoline engines. Also all kinds of

HARD AND SOFT COAL.

Blosburg Smithing Coal. Royal Cement Plaster. Crown Fin-

ish Plaster Paris. Lake Sand. Barrel Lime, Hair

and Salt. Our prices are the lowest in the

city. Please give us a call.

No. 26 Henry St. 'Phone 91. DELAWARE, OHIO.

You will make no mistake if you buy your

GROCERIES!

OF

J. G. OLDHAM.

He intends always to keep the best. Call him by telephone

and get prices.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 101)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 101)

Description

[page 101]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 96 of Delaware Cook Book]

New York Cash Store!

FINE CHINA,

CUT GLASS,

AND

SILVERWARE.

Gent's Furnishings

Athletic Goods,

Notions, Corsets,

etc., etc.,

[image of feet and ankles]

FINE HOSIERY.

A COMPLETE LINE OF KITCHEN FURNITURE.

48-50 NORTH SANDUSKY STREET.

NEW YORK CASH STORE.

We take this opportunity to extend to all a

SPECIAL INVITATION

to call and see us, when in search of anything in the line of

either

Dry Goods, Notions or Millinery.

New Goods arrive almost daily, so that we always have the

VERY LATEST AND BEST

things the market affords.

SNODGRASS & CO.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 102)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 102)

Description

[page 102]

[corresponds to inside of back cover of Delaware Cook Book]

BYERS' CARPET STORE.

You will find the Best and Cheapest Line of

Carpets, Linoleums, Oil Cloths, Lace Curtains,

Rugs, and Upholstery Goods.

Call and see.

T. M. BYERS.

HOUSER, HOEFFLE & CO.,

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

Hardware Merchants,

Handle a full line of

Builders' Hardware, Paints, Oils, Varnishes, etc.

A complete line of

BABY CARRIAGES.

GIVE THEM A CALL.

E. D. SHEETS,

(Successor to Kerr & Co.)

FURNITURE

FUNERAL

AND

DEALER

NO. 19 & 21 W. WINTER STREET, DELAWARE, OHIO

TELEPHONE 150. OPEN DAILY.
Delaware Cook Book (p. 103)

Title

Delaware Cook Book (p. 103)

Description

[page 103]

[corresponds to back cover of Delaware Cook Book]

[blank]

Dublin Core

Title

Delaware Cook Book

Subject

Churches--St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal--Delaware--Ohio
Cookbooks--St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church--Delaware--Ohio
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--History

Description

This cookbook was compiled by the women of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church in Delaware, Ohio.

Creator

The Women of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church in Delaware, Ohio

Publisher

F.T. Evans Printing and Publishing House, Delaware County, Ohio

Date

1896

Rights

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/

Format

Book

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

22221036

Collection

Citation

The Women of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church in Delaware, Ohio, “Delaware Cook Book,” Delaware County Memory, accessed September 27, 2021, http://delawarecountymemory.org/items/show/202.

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